3D printing news sliced Zortrax, Aectual, GEWO 3D, Admaflex, Create O&P 3D

Today in Sliced, our 3D printing news digest, we collect all the latest news on artistic applications, product releases and medical news.

In addition to the title companies, we feature Metso, MakerBrane, Mighty Oak Medical, designer Patricia Urquiola, custom lighting company LimeLite, and artistic shoe brand Ica & Kostika. We also have some business updates, from Merck to startup companies, including Indian startup, Next Big Innovation Labs and Swiss startup 9Tlabs.

3D printing applications for architects and construction

Spanish architect and designer Patricia Urquiola has designed a luxury products exhibition room with custom 3D printed floors. The exhibition was for the BMW 7 car series. It featured Urquiola’s signature furniture and bespoke 3D printed flooring in a wavy white pattern, inspired by the Northern Lights. The floors were designed using 3D printing techniques by Aectual, a Dutch design-tech company that makes flooring out of bio-based plastics.

Patricia Urquiola custom-designed floors, 3D printed via Aectual. Photo via BMW.
Patricia Urquiola custom-designed floors, 3D printed via Aectual. Photo via BMW.

Dutch construction companies Bam Infra and Weber Beamix have opened Europe’s first 3D concrete printing plant in Eindhoven, Netherlands. The first project was a 3D printed bicycle bridge. Following this, the province of Noord Holland ordered four 3D printed concrete bridges. Province area manager Barry Hol said, “We believe in this technique. At some point, you also have to break through the chicken-egg problem.”

First 3D printed bicycle bridge in Noord-Brabant, created by BAM Infra and Eindhoven University of Technology. Photo via BAM Infra.
First 3D printed bicycle bridge in Noord-Brabant, created by BAM Infra and Eindhoven University of Technology. Photo via BAM Infra.

Still on the subject of bridges, a 15-meter-long 3D printed pedestrian bridge has been installed in Shanghai – now the world’s longest 3D printed footbridge. According to Chen Xiaoming, deputy chief engineer at Shanghai Construction Engineering Machinery Group, the installation took 35 days to erect in Taopu Smart City Central Park. It is made of resin and other composite materials, and could last up to 30 years.

Testing of the 3D printed bridge in laboratory conditions. Image via Shine
Shanghai Construction Engineering Machinery testing the 3D printed bridge in laboratory conditions. Image via Shine.

Australian lighting fixtures company, LimeLite, has released three new light collections made using 3D printers from Poland’s Zortrax. LimeLite now has a farm of 30 3D printers, operating around the clock and producing approximately 20 lamps per day. 

A LimeLite lamp, 3D printed on a Zortax printer. Photo via Zortrax.
A LimeLite lamp, 3D printed on a Zortax printer. Photo via Zortrax.

Metso, a Finnish construction company, has received its first valves with 3D printed parts from its Helsinki plant. The valves are designed to withstand numerous fast open-close cycles without maintenance. The parts are part of a broader digitalization project at the company. 

Footwear brand Ica & Kostika has launched a new 3D printed shoe collection, called Exobiology. The shoes are shaped in exoskeleton-like structures, mimicking sea life such as corals and seahorses. The wearable art was built to be lightweight and durable, as well as complement the natural curvature of the foot. To develop the shoes, the company 3D printed them in Nylon PA12 and finished them with automotive grade electroplating.

Sea themed printed shoe design, by Ica & Kostika. Photo via Ica & Kostika.
Sea themed printed shoe design, by Ica & Kostika. Photo via Ica & Kostika.

New 3D printers and hardware product releases

At Formnext 2019, GEWO 3D, a German manufacturer of high-temperature FFF/FDM 3D printers, will present its new model, the PERFORMER260. The 3D printer has been developed for industrial additive manufacturing of high-performance plastics. Features of the new PERFORMER260 include integrated filament drying.

9T labs, a Swiss startup, is currently sending out beta units for a continuous fiber deposition 3D printer add-on. The CarbonKit can create industry grade carbon fiber composites, for producing strong, lightweight parts. The CarbonKit is made up of a carbon fiber PA12 spool, material box and printhead with dual extrusion, to be added to an existing 3D printer.

Upgrades to 3D printing software

Admatec Europe, a Netherlands-based company specializing in ceramic 3D printing, has released new software for its Adamflex 130 3D printer. The update allows the Adamflex 130 to handle multiple parts with unique parameter sets within one print job. Previously, the user could only change these parameters between layers – now, the user can set multiple different settings within a single layer.

This enables the user to change led power, pixel value and exposure time between different areas within the same layer. Controlling the settings for each part individually allows you to control the parameters for the smaller features separate from the rest of the geometry. This new feature also comes with an updated file format, a “SLC.zip” file extension, which can be opened and edited in Windows Explorer.

130 3D printer production line, by Admatec Europe. Photo via Admatec.
130 3D printer production line, by Admatec Europe. Photo via Admatec.

Similarly, the Beta version of MakerBrane, a website for sharing 3D print designs, has gone live. The website provides access to thousands of real-life parts to build anything the user requires. Visitors of the site can view a catalog of existing designs, each entry including information on the build-type, materials, difficulty to build, and the appropriate age range for the finished result (i.e., if the finished product is suitable for infants).

A design for a 3D printed tree on MakerBrane. Photo via MakerBrane.
A design for a 3D printed tree on MakerBrane. Photo via MakerBrane.

Additive manufacturing and the medical sector

New Jersey-based medical technology company, Additive Orthopaedics, has won FDA clearance for its patient-specific 3D printed locking lattice plates. The plates align, stabilize and fuse fractures and other problems found in small bones, such as those in the foot and ankle. The plates also enhance bone repair throughout the implant structure.

Furthermore, the lattice design has smaller external pores and larger internal pores, to allow for the introduction and of pharmaceuticals for more efficient healing.

From left to right: Additive Orthopaedics’s lattice structure, plate / wedge orthopaedic device, and diagram of installment in the foot to combat a toe fracture. Images from Additive Orthopaedics.
From left to right: Additive Orthopaedics’s lattice structure, plate/wedge orthopedic device, and diagram of an installment in the foot to combat a toe fracture. Images via Additive Orthopaedics.

Indian 3D bioprinting company, Next Big Innovation Labs (NBIL), has been announced as one of 10 startups that will join the Accelerator program by science and technology company Merck. NBIL has developed a global 3D bioprinting platform and is working towards developing 3D Bioprinted Skin, called InnoSkin.

The team will join the Accelerator for three months at the Merck Innovation Centre in Darmstadt, Germany, and will have the opportunity to extend their stay by joining the company’s China Innovation Hub in Shanghai.

Colorado-based med-tech company, Mighty Oak Medical, has received CE mark clearance for its patient-specific, 3D printed FIREFLY pedicle screw navigation system, extending its use into the European market.

The FIREFLY navigation system is a physical guide to help surgeons before and during spinal fusion surgery. It features guide wire to ensure that screws are correctly placed within vertebral pedicles, and mechanically constrain the drill. Using FIREFLY, the surgeon can access a 3D printed patient-specific spine model to plan their procedure in advance, increasing efficiency and reducing risk in the operating theater.

The FIREFLY navigation system, a 3D printed guide to help surgeon access a patient’s spine. Photo Via Mighty Oak Medical.
The FIREFLY navigation system, a 3D printed guide to help surgeon access a patient’s spine. Photo Via Mighty Oak Medical.

In other news, Jeff Erenstone, the co-founder of Create O&P 3D, a printing orthotic and prosthetic manufacturer in New York, and co-creator of the first medical-grade 3D printed arm, has resigned.

Erenstone has decided to move on to focus on his non-profit organization, Operation Namaste. This organization aims to advance prosthetic care using applied 3D printing solutions, in areas where prosthesis are otherwise unavailable.   

Jeff Erenstone, Founder of Create O&P, constructing 3D printed prosthetics. Photo via Create O&P.
Jeff Erenstone, Founder of Create O&P, constructing 3D printed prosthetics. Photo via Create O&P.

3D printing and business

In research and business, the University of Birmingham will be working with Germany’s Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM) to conduct research into additive manufacturing. Over the next 12 months, the partners will also collaborate across research fields such as energy, environmental Sciences, chemistry, and digitalization.

In aerospace, Mexican aviation company Aeromexico has adopted 8tree’s 3D surface wireless 3D scanner tool, dentCHECK, to enhance the efficiency of its dent-mapping. This process applies markings of dents on images of aircrafts where one or more defects have been identified.

Finally, Copper3D, a Chilean materials company, has begun a new European distribution and reseller agreement with UK printer manufacturer, 3D GBIRE. Copper3D takes the materials used in 3D printing and adds an additive based on copper nanoparticles to transform these materials into antibacterial nano-composites. This is to reduce the incidence of dermic disorders from 3D printed prostheses.

A Copper3D printed antibacterial cast (right) next to a conventional cast (left).
A Copper3D printed antibacterial cast (right) next to a conventional cast (left).

Inspired by an individual, or a company? Nominate in the upcoming 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019 – there are categories for startup of the year, medical application of the year and more.

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Featured image shows Sliced logo over a 3D printed shoe design, by Ica & Kostika. Photo via Ica & Kostika.

GEFERTEC and Linde Group partner to explore process gas and oxygen for metal 3D printing

GEFERTEC, the German developer and provider of 3DMP metal 3D printers and technology, has partnered with Linde Group, a Munich-based chemical company, to investigate process gas and oxygen within metal additive manufacturing.

Gases significantly influence the material properties of an additively manufactured part. Within the chamber of a 3D printer, the gas composition affects the weight, texture, and overall parameters of a component.

GEFERTEC’s 3DMP technology, which incorporates wire-arc melting based metal additive manufacturing to create near-net-shape components, heavily relies on the process gases.

3DMP technology

According to GEFERTEC, 3DMP technology promises to eradicate waste with “nearly 100% material utilization,” and cost savings of “up to 60% versus conventional manufacturing.”

The company has developed four 3DMP machines in its portfolio. This includes the arc603, a 3-axis machine capable of creating components up to 3 m³, with a maximum mass of 3000kg and the arc605, a 5-axis machine with a maximum capacity of up to 0.8 m³ and 500 kg mass.

GEFERTEC has also developed the arc405, a 5-axis, 0.06 m³ capabilities and a maximum mass of 200 kg, and the arc403, the 3-axis machine which has been recently installed by Airbus.

The arc605 3D printer. Image via GEFERTEC.
The arc605 3D printer. Image via GEFERTEC.

Investigating gas and oxygen for 3D printing

Within this research collaboration, MT Aerospace AG, a German aerospace company, will perform mechanical tests of 3D printed parts from 3DMP. The fabrication of such parts will take place at the additive manufacturing laboratory of Fraunhofer IGCV, where GEFERTEC’s machinery is installed. Fraunhofer is the fourth co-operation partner of this project.

Following these processes, the influence of welding parameters and process gas on the parts will be examined. The ultimate goal of this project is the production of larger parts at high production speed made of the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V. If successful, these 3D printed parts will meet the quality requirements for the aerospace industry.

Who has made the most significant contribution to the aerospace sector? Nominate for the upcoming 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019.

Also, for the updates on 3D printing in the aerospace sector, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start this year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to commence your career in additive manufacturing.

Featured image shows the GEFERTEC 3DMP additive manufacturing process. Photo via GEFERTEC.

Relativity Space to launch 3D printed rockets from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station

Relativity Space, a Californian aerospace startup, has signed a contract with the U.S. Air Force to operate its own launch facility on one of their sites.

The agreement permits the company to test its 3D printed rockets at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The company plans the first launch of its Terran rocket at the end of 2020.

“We look forward to working with them as they continue the process to launch the Terran 1 vehicle from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station,” said Thomas Eye, the director of plans & programs for the 45th Space Wing of the U.S. Air Force.

“We were impressed with Relativity’s seasoned team and its innovative approach to space technology.”

Relativity Space’s Terran rocket  launching from Cape Canaveral’s LC-16 launchpad.
A computer rendering shows Relativity Space’s Terran rocket launching from Cape Canaveral’s LC-16 launchpad. Image via Relativity Space.

The rapid growth of Relatively Space

Cape Canaveral has been used for launches from SpaceX, United Launch Alliance and Blue Origin. Relativity Space is the newest of these companies to use the launch station. In fact, the company was established because the founders, Tim Ellis and Jordan Noone, both worked at Blue Origin and SpaceX,  and felt that neither company had seen the true potential of 3D printing for rocket manufacturing.

Aerojet Rocketdyne was the first company to manufacture and successfully test an engine that was entirely 3D printed, in 2014. However, to date, there are no 100% 3D printed rockets. Relativity Space is currently building a mid-size orbital rocket with 95% 3D printed parts.

Soon after its inception, Relativity Space grew rapidly, raising $45.1 million in three years. It has recently closed $140 million in Series E funding, and built one of the world’s largest 3D printers – Stargate – standing at 7 feet wide and 14 feet tall. One of the company’s goals for 2020 is to 3D print a 90-foot-tall, 7-foot-wide rocket, using the Stargate.

The Stargate 3D printer at Relativity Space HQ. Photo via Relativity Space.
The Stargate 3D printer at Relativity Space HQ. Photo via Relativity Space.

3D printed rocket engines

While SpaceX has been using 3D printed components for four years, most notably in its Superdraco engine, it has not yet moved into building entire rockets or rocket engines this way. However, it is beginning to use more additive manufacturing materials for other projects. Recently, SpaceX produced a 3D printed satellite with Telesat, a Canadian satellite communications company.

Blue Origin’s reusable rocket, New Shepard, was built with “over 400 additively manufactured parts,” according to its President, Rob Meyerson, who made a bid to use 3D printed components increasingly in the future. Lately, the company has been working on selling tickets for commercial space flights in 2019, and is currently developing reusable rockets with 3D printed components and materials.

One company that has produced a full rocket engine using 3D printing techniques is Launcher, founded in 2017. The New-York based company specialises in 3D printed engines (not necessarily for rockets), and last October, used its techniques to develop a liquid oxygen (LOX)/kerosene rocket, which can transport satellites into low orbit around Earth.

The Terran rocket is estimated to cost $10 million per launch, but Relativity Space anticipate that it will save money by using the Cape Canaveral launch pad – it would take about four years to build Relativity’s own launchpad from scratch, Ellis estimated.

The 3D printed copper E1 engine. Photo via Launcher
The 3D printed copper E1 engine. Photo via Launcher

Did you know, you can nominate your favorite aerospace company for the 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019? There are all sorts of categories to reward the best players of the year.

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Featured image shows a computer rendering of Relativity Space’s Terran rocket launching from Cape Canaveral’s LC-16 launchpad. Image via Relativity Space. 

Penn State researchers integrate ‘Embodied Logic’ into 3D printed smart objects

Engineers from the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) have created bioinspired 3D printed structures that move and react to its environment.

Such objects do not require electronically-integrated systems, but, much like the venus fly trap, uses atmospheric stimuli to operate; the Penn State team have dubbed this as “embodied logic”. The researchers published their study in the journal Nature Communications.

“Inspired by nature, we embody logic in autonomous systems to enable them to respond to multiple stimuli,” the study states.

“Using 3D printable fibrous composites, we fabricate structures with geometries near bifurcation points [where an object splits]. When suitable stimuli are present, the materials swell. This forces a key geometric parameter to pass through a bifurcation, triggering rapid and large-amplitude self-actuation.”

The following clip from Penn State displays a 3D printed venus flytrap which only closes when weight is inside and the actuator is exposed to a solvent.

3D printed bistable lattices

According to Jordan Raney, an assistant professor in Penn Engineering’s Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, and leader of this research, “Bistability is determined by geometry, whereas responsiveness comes out of the material’s chemical properties.”

“Our approach uses multi-material 3D printing to bridge across these separate fields so that we can harness material responsiveness to change our structures’ geometric parameters in just the right ways.”

The Penn State team created active structures with “gates” that can be controlled by simple changes in the environment. These gates contained non-electric actuators. With a lattice formation, the polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based and hydrogel-based structures, maintain elastic energy for kinetic movement. PDMS is a silicon-based organic polymer. Furthermore, the team used water and oil-based solvents, to activate the 3D printed structures.

“[This] could be useful for applications in microfluidics,” added Raney.

“Rather than using a solid-state sensor and microprocessor that are constantly reading what’s flowing into a microfluidic chip, we could, for example, design a gate that shuts automatically if it detects a certain contaminant.”

An embodied logic actuator releasing its elastic energy. Clip via Penn State.
An embodied logic actuator releasing its elastic energy. Clip via Penn State.

4D printing with shape-changing materials

Shaping-changing have been used in additive manufacturing to create 3D printed moving objects, i,e, 4D printing. Recently, Nicole Hone, an industrial design Master’s student at the Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand, designed several 4D printed interactive plants using multi-material 3D printing and elastopolymer composites.

Prior to this, researchers from the University of Bristol and University of Bath, created a 4D printed smart material from 3D printed ink that harnesses cellulose fibers to transform in response to water.

The study, “Bifurcation-based embodied logic and autonomous actuation,” was co-authored by Yijie Jiang, Lucia M. Korpas, and Jordan R. Raney.

Nominate for the upcoming 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019.

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Featured image shows an embodied logic actuator releasing its elastic energy. Clip via Penn State.

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3D Printing Industry Awards 2019 Start-up of the Year update

Who are the leading 3D printing start-ups?

There is still time to make a nomination in the 2019 3D Printing Industry Awards. There are 20 categories in total, spanning the additive manufacturing ecosystem of materials, hardware and software.

This year, as always, 3D Printing Startup of the Year is shaping up to be one of the most competitive categories. To date 3D Printing Industry readers have submitted almost 100 budding businesses for this accolade, with plenty more yet to come. Here we take a look at a selection of this year’s nominees, working in everything from post-processing, materials and design, to medical models, workflow optimization and 3D bioprinting.

If you don’t see your company or a startup you think deserves an award listed below – it’s not too late! Make your nominations here to get the name on the list before nominations close on March 1st 2019.

The 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy in the hands of one of last year's winners.
The 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy made by Protolabs in the hands of one of last year’s winners.

Post processing, services, consumables and more

As the 3D printing industry matures we are certainly starting to see a rise in the number of companies with products and platforms designed to support and supplement areas such as post processing, services and consumables. In 2019 especially, our reader’s nominations reflect that.

DyeMansion Gmbh, a re-coating specialist for 3D printed parts and former winner of the Formnext Start-up Challenge, has also been nominated.

Other mentions include popular 3D printer adhesive brand Magigoo, manufacturing service provider Xometry, online 3D ecosystem Jellypipe, and last year’s 3D Printing Industry Awards Winner E3D.

Budding 3D printer providers 

The industry is also growing through new 3D printing technologies and machines.

In 2018, Evolve Additive Solutions launched with $19 million in equity invested by LEGO Brand GroupStanley Black & Decker and a third undisclosed party.

Emerging from the growing 3D printing scene in India, Ethereal Machines is a startup with four different-purpose machines under its belt.

Also in terms of hardware, nominations have been earned by Lumi Industries, M3D, BigRep, BEEVERYCREATIVE, BCN3D Technologies, and Rize Inc.

Sample full color 3D printed part from the XRIZE. Photo via RIZE
A sample full color 3D printed part from the new XRIZE system. Photo via RIZE

The material world

Another big part of 3D Printing Startup of the Year nominations is materials. Returning for a second year is DimensionInx, the company that creates 3D-Paints including the ink for hyperelastic bone research.

Czech materials manufacturer Fillamentum has also earned a nomination, as has Esun, The Virtual Foundry, PrintGreen3D and many others.

The year of the 3D printed building?

For the first time this year 3D Printing Industry readers have nominated a selection of startups developing systems for 3D printing in construction.

Based in Spain, we have the EU-backed 3DCons, a consortium of eight companies seeking to rehabilitate claddings through direct 3D printing.

Formed in the closing months of 2018, there’s also COBOD International, a construction spin out of Danish 3D printing reseller 3D Printhuset.

And, for the third year in a row, Parisian large scale 3D printing firm XtreeE has been nominated in this category.

Cement structure 3D printed by XtreeE. Photo via XtreeE
Cement structure 3D printed by XtreeE. Photo via XtreeE

Supporting hospitals and biomedical research 

Remaining a key vertical for the industry, medical now has its own fair share of specially developed 3D printing companies.

In 2018, UK startup 3D LifePrints earned its place providing custom medical models to NHS hospitals. Also based in the UK, axial3D is working to making 3D printing more accessible to healthcare professionals.

Of the many 3D bioprinting startups out there, we have also received nominations for Swedish company CELLINK, and the Philadelphia-headquartered Allevi.

You decide the 2019 3D Printing Start-up of the Year

All of the companies mentioned in this article and more have already been nominated for our 2019 3D Printing Startup of the Year Award, but they still need your support. If you’re a company looking to get involved in the 3D Printing Industry Awards this year it’s time to start sharing this nomination with your network. As for our readers – if there’s anything missing from the list above, now’s your chance to get your voice heard.

Make your nominations for the 2019 3D Printing Industry Awards now.

For further awards updates and ideas for who to nominate this year, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, follow us on Facebook and like us on Twitter. Seeking 3D Printing Jobs? Join and advertise on our dedicated site now to reach professionals in this industry.

Featured image shows the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy made by Protolabs

Evonik expands industrial 3D printing portfolio, acquires Structured Polymers

German industrial chemical corporation Evonik has acquired 3D printing materials Austin based start-up Structured Polymers Inc.

Deemed “The Future of SLS Powder” Structured Polymers’ specialism is color, with their TrueBlack powder described as “the world’s first SLS ink with inherent color”. As such, these powders do not require any recoloring, i.e. painting or dyeing, after 3D printing.

By adding Structured Polymers to its material portfolio, Evonik continues to grow its presence in the additive manufacturing sector.

Dr. Ralph Marquardt, head of Strategy and Growth Businesses for Evonik Resource Efficiency GmbH, comments, “The acquisition of Structured Polymers’ technology excellently complements our existing activities with high-performance polymers for additive manufacturing,”

“Thanks to our decades of expertise in polymer chemistry, this means we will expand our portfolio of customized, ready-to-use polymer materials for the highly attractive, rapidly growing 3D printing market, thus giving us a key role in shaping development of that market.”

Working with the inventors of SLS

An offshoot of restructuring at RAG AG, Germany’s largest coal mining corporation, Evonik was formed in 2007.

The product offering covers a portfolio of more than 4,000 materials, including resins, aerosols and polymer additives. In 3D printing, the company was an early partner of HP’s Open Materials Platform, and it produces polymer powders for leading German 3D printer manufacturer EOS. Further ramping up its efforts in additive, the company recently announced that it would be opening a new specialist Polyamide 12 (PA12) powder production plant, fueled in part by an increased demand for 3D printing materials.

On the other hand, Structured Polymers was founded in 2013. In May 2014 the company received $1.5 million in seed funding through online equity platform Microventures. Its CTO, Dr. Carl Deckard, and adviser, Dr. Joseph Beaman, are credited as the inventors of SLS technology from the University of Texas at Austin in the mid-1980s.

Newspaper clipping picturing Dr. Joseph Beaman and Dr. Carl Deckard on the invention of SLS 3D printing. Image via me.utexas.edu
Newspaper clipping picturing Dr. Joseph Beaman and Dr. Carl Deckard on the invention of SLS 3D printing. Image via me.utexas.edu

Structured Polymers patented technology 

Structured Polymers uses patented technology to manufacture materials for additive manufacturing. Its first product is True Black Nylon 12, an SLS powder that promises superior surface finish and color to plain, 3D printed powders. Though proved with this polymer, the technology is applicable to a wide variety of thermoplastics.

Thomas Grosse-Puppendahl, head of the Additive Manufacturing Innovation Growth Field at Evonik, explains, “The new technology allows us to take virtually any semi-crystalline thermoplastic, such as polybutylene terephthalate, polyether ketone (PEK), or polyamide 6, or polymer powders with specialized properties like color, conductivity, or flame protection, and produce them for common powder-based 3D printing processes, such as selective laser sintering, high-speed sintering, or multi-jet fusion,”

“In addition, we anticipate that Structured Polymers’ technology can be scaled up easily and economically.”

3D printed parts made from Structured Polymers True Black Nylon 12. Photo via Structured Polymers
3D printed parts made from Structured Polymers True Black Nylon 12. Photo via Structured Polymers

Terms of the acquisition 

Evonik first placed its interest in this acquisition through a venture capital investment in Structured Polymers dating back to fall 2017.

Vikram Devarajan, CEO of Structured Polymers Inc., concludes, “We are very pleased to harness the power of Evonik to expand our innovative technology platform even further,”

“In the near future,” he adds, “this will allow us to diversify the 3D printing materials market to a significant degree and to work with our customers on developing new business opportunities.”

Full terms of the transaction between Evonik and Structured Polymers remain undisclosed.

Could either of these companies be a recipient of a 3D Printing Industry AwardMake your nominations now to decide. For all the latest 3D printing  buiness news subscribe to our newsletter, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

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Featured image shows 3D printed parts made from Structured Polymers True Black Nylon 12. Photo via Structured Polymers