Scoobe3D, new “no post processing” 3D scanning technology hits Kickstarter

Scoobe3D GmbH a German 3D scanning technology startup, has launched a new device that makes it easy to create 3D models. The Scoobe3D scanner, which is now available for pre-order on Kickstarter, uses a method the creators believe is “the first new 3D scanning technology in over 10 years.”

Accurate and simple to use, the device overcomes common issues associated with 3D scanners, claiming “no post processing” is required for the captured digital data, even when scanning difficult materials with reflective surfaces.

Overcoming the challenges of 3D scanning

In the 3D printing ecosystem, scanning is the technology behind a number of cultural heritage projects, for artifact preservation and restoration. It also allows designers to reverse engineer products with a specific purpose in mind, or make replacements for lost or damaged parts.

Though the 3D printing part of this process is relatively simple, file preparation and attaining the 3D data to create these objects can be complicated.

One simple and popular technique for 3D model creation is photogrammetry. As this method relies on the stitching together of multiple photos around an object, a great deal of post-processing is required to clean the file of its background.

In other methods, where laser-light scanning is applied to an object, the user can run into problems when scanning shiny objects. The method can also capture surplus data points that have to be cleaned before 3D printing.

Scoobe3D is designed as a solution to these challenges. The company motto is “3D as easy as 2D,” i.e. bringing simple office document scanning to objects.

 

The Scoobe3D scanner is capable of capturing objects with shiny surfaces. Image via Scoobe3D
The Scoobe3D scanner is capable of capturing objects with shiny surfaces. Image via Scoobe3D

The “first new 3D scanning technology in over 10 years”

The technology used in the Scoobe3D scanner combines Photogrammetry with Time-of-Flight and Polarization 3D Scanning.

Time-of-Flight is the same technology used by police radar guns. A laser light is omitted and the device measures how long it takes for it to bounce back off the object in question. Absolute data capture about the dimensions of an object is acquired quickly, but this does not capture the color or texture of an object – this, of course, is the job of photogrammetry.

Polarization 3D Scanning is the technology that makes Scoobe3D’s device capable of capturing specular surfaces. It is a proprietary patent-pending technology developed by Scoobe3D that, according to the company “guarantees a precise and reliable filtering, thus granting an accurate extraction of the 3D information contained in polarized light” reflected by an object. The technique was inspired by and improves upon an MIT research paper. Results of this paper found “Polarization 3D Scanning leads to a higher level of detail in the resulting 3D model by up to 1,000 times.”

The Scoobe3D combination technology was created in a 2.5 year development cycle by a team of founders with experience at Bosch Group, BMW group, and the Fraunhofer Institute of Manufacturing Engineering and Automation (IPA).

A deep dive into Scoobe3D’s technology is available on the 3D scanner’s Kickstarter.

 

Breakdown of Scoobe3D scanner technology. Image via Scoobe3D
Breakdown of Scoobe3D scanner technology. Image via Scoobe3D

Pre-order Scoobe3D scanner

The Scoobe3D scanner itself is a stand-alone device the size of a smartphone. It is available on Kickstarter as two models, the Scoobe3D Basic and, simply, the Scoobe3D.

The Scoobe3D Basic uses 3D polarization and photogrammetry, producing an accuracy within 0.5 mm when covering the optimal scan area of 50 x 50 x 50 cm. Larger objects are possible to scan with the basic device but with a different level of accuracy.

The more advanced Scoobe3D model incorporates polarization and photogrammetry with Time-of-Flight technology. It has an accuracy of up to 0.1 mm depending on object size and shooting distance, and can be used across an optimal scan area of 2 x 2 x 2 m or rooms of 320 qm. As with the Basic model, the advanced Scoobe3D scanner is also capable of capturing larger areas, at a decreased accuracy.

The output of both models is delivered as a universally 3D printable .stl file. The output from the Scoobe3D can also be imported as a STEP file format and imported to any commercially available CAD software.

For a limited time, the Scoobe3D Basic is available for an early bird price of €599 ($699 approx.) Early bird prices for the advanced Scoobe3D model start at €975 ($1138).

Product deliveries are estimated June through September 2019.

Back Scoobe3D now on Kickstarter.

Allevi 3 multimaterial 3D bioprinter technical specifications and pricing

Philadelphia-headquartered Allevi has launched a new 3D bioprinter – the Allevi 3. Complete with three extruders, the new system allows users to combine multiple biomaterials to build the foundations of complex tissues and devices.

A 3D bioprinted microfluidic chip sample. Photo via Allevi
A 3D bioprinted microfluidic chip sample. Photo via Allevi

Allevi powered medical research

Allevi, previously known as BioBots, was founded in 2014 with a mission to “make it easy to design and engineer 3D tissues.” As such, the company works on all parts of the “3D printing trifecta,” developing software, materials and hardware suited to the production of biological matter.

With the release of the Allevi 3, the company now has four 3D bioprinters in its portfolio, each numbered according to its extruder count: the Allevi 6, the Allevi 2 and the Allevi 1, which was released in February 2018.

Working closely with its customers, Allevi 3D bioprinters have been cited in numerous studies, including lab-on-a-chip activity at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and bioink bench marking at Stanford University.

Most recently, the company announced a partnership with Made In Space that aims to develop a 3D bioprinter that can work in low-gravity conditions.

Highlights of the Allevi 3 

Each of Allevi’s 3D bioprinters are designed for ease-of-use with pre-made protocols for all bioinks offered by the company. Importantly, the Allevi 3 also comes with auto calibration, and both the extruders and print bed can be switched out in lieu of future updates.

With a consideration for the experimental aspect of 3D bioprinting, the Allevi 3 is an open system giving the user complete control over every parameter, optional use of a self-made bioink, and the ability to operate from either PC and MAC OS.

The 3D bioprinter has a build volume of 90 x 130 x 60 mm (W x L x H), and occupies a footprint of 406.4 x 355.6 x 355.6 mm. Across all axis, the Allevi 3 is capable of a single micron precision.

Quotes for the Allevi 3 are available on request from the company, and subject to optional material packages such as the Starter Bioink Kit or Organ-on-a-chip Kit.

The Allevia Organ-on-a-chip Kit, complete with deposition syringes, printing needle, petri dish, curing agent, isopropyl alcohol and protocol. Photo via Allevi
The Allevia Organ-on-a-chip Kit, complete with deposition syringes, printing needle, petri dish, curing agent, isopropyl alcohol and protocol. Photo via Allevi

Allevi 3 full technical specifications

Dimensions: 406.4 x 355.6 x 355.6 mm

Weight: 22 lb (9.9 kg)

Power requirement: 110V – 240V

Connectivity: USB

Operating Systems: PC and Mac OS

Construction: Aluminum frame

Stepper motors: 0.9 degrees step angle

X,Y Precision: 1 μm

Z Precision: 1 μm

Extruder: Three, heating and cooling

Max temp – low: 4°C

Max temp – high: 160°C

Photocuring: 365 nm or 405 nm

Accepted print files: .stl, GCode

Printing technology: FDM/FFF

Build volume: 90 x 130 x 60 mm (W x L x H)

Print resolution: 150 μm

Build structure: Petri dish, tissue culture plate, glass slide

For more of the latest 3D printing hardware, software and materials releases subscribe to the most widely read newsletter in the industry, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for new opportunities in academia and industry.

Featured image shows the Allevi 3 bioprinter. Photo via Allevi

LPW’s reusable Powder Range enables cost-effective additive manufacturing

LPW Technology, a UK-based provider of metal powders for additive manufacturing, has emphasized the commercial benefits of its Powder Range in its latest case study.

“As with conventional manufacturing, material is generally seen as the highest cost factor in ongoing production, however, powder reuse means that final cost per part does not have to reflect initial powder cost per kilo,” explained an LPW spokeperson.

More powder less wastage

Founded over a decade ago, LPW has exclusively provided its range of metal powders exclusively to the additive manufacturing market. As part of 3D Printing Industry’s Trends in Additive Manufacturing for End-Use Production series, Ben Ferrar, COO at LPW stated:

“In manufacturing, cost is always an important consideration. We are finding that at this point, many of the companies moving towards production are less concerned about the cost of implementation than they are about the cost of getting it wrong.”

We don’t manufacture for any other sector  which is one of the reasons why our powders are used in over 50% of the AM machines installed worldwide.”

Thus, considering the factors that affect a manufacturer’s final cost per part, such as material and its usage, businesses can leverage LPW’s Inconel 718 AM metal powder range. This powder can be commercially reused to decrease production costs as well as “influence the dynamic mechanical performance of a component.”

“The business case for reusing powder is strong, the more times you can reuse a batch of powder the lower the final cost per part is, on the basis of less powder ‘wasted’. The number of times a material can be reused is often determined by the user or a perceived industry standard, but either way material performance in delivering as-built parts is typically the key metric,” LPW stated in the case study.

Factors influencing cost per par. Image via LPW.
Factors influencing cost per par. Image via LPW.

Metal powder evolution

According to LPW, metal powder can evolve with reuse, altering the properties of a 3D printed part. This is due to its oxygen concentration which increases linearly depending on the number of time it’s reused. Oxygen levels in feedstock material, as well as its process parameters, and gas purity used during atomization contribute to the costly production of evolutionary powders with lower oxygen levels.

Thus, a cheaper high oxygen metal powder can be more appealing to manufacturers, despite the possibilities of a more fatigued component. LPW added that “It may seem more cost effective to use powder with a higher oxygen content but this is only true if a user does not consider reusing the metal powder.”

As seen from the diagrams below, there is a linear relationship between a powders oxygen levels and its amount of reuse. LPW explained: “It is logical that starting with a virgin powder with lower oxygen levels will allow more builds to be completed before the specification limit is reached.” According to LPW, an increase of oxygen content of 50 ppm is sufficient to significantly reduce the fatigue life of the material at elevated temperatures.

Evolution of oxygen content in powder and part, and influence on mechanical properties of Inconel 718. Image via LPW.
Evolution of oxygen content in powder and part, and influence on mechanical properties of Inconel 718. Image via LPW.

The case study goes on to compare the total cost of ownership of two batches of Inconel 718 powder and its reuse; this comparison is said to demonstrate the confidence to reuse powder for cost-effective metal additive manufacturing.

The diagram below depicts a batch with an oxygen content of 200 ppm and a cost of $60 per kg. While another batch has an oxygen content of 100 ppm with a cost of $70 per kg. The case study concludes that although the batch with a cost of $70 per kg is more costly,  “it is also 100 ppm lower in oxygen, if we take a material specification limit of 250 ppm, and apply the modest oxygen evolution rate of 3.5 ppm per build, we find we can achieve triple the number of reuses with the lower oxygen powder.”

“This means that despite a 16.7% increase in material cost, we actually see a 60% reduction in the final cost per part versus the cheaper, higher oxygen content powder.”

Impact of virgin chemistry on final cost per part for Inconel 718. Image via LPW.
Impact of virgin chemistry on final cost per part for Inconel 718. Image via LPW.

LPW concluded its findings by stating “the use of high-quality material is not only to achieve optimum results from a single use but to extend the commercial and specification life of the powder. Additive Manufacturing may be at the cutting edge of manufacturing technology, but in this case, the old rule still applies – buy cheap, buy twice.”

Keep up with the latest 3D printing news and case studies by subscribing to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Searching for new talent or seeking a career change? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows a mountain of metal powder. Photo via LPW Technology.

Syria Relief appeals for 3D printed prosthetics for children

Syria Relief, a UK-based charity working in Syria, has pleaded the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) to provide funding for 3D prosthetics for children.

Traditional methods of making prosthetics are costly and time-consuming. Currently, it takes five days for the charity to make a prosthetic. The doctors working on the relief effort believe that the need of prosthetics in Syria can be met with a one off investment in 3D printers to make the prosthetics. 

Dr Malik Nizamettin, the medical manager of Syria Relief, said, “we cannot make enough limbs to keep up with demand and who knows how more casualties there will be in the battles to come […] we made our case to DFID and a number of MPs based on our six-month waiting list for limbs

The charity was refused direct funding from the DFID and had to make its case to other larger charity organizations like Save The Children. 

Syria Relief runs the National Syrian Project for Prosthetic Limbs in Syria. Photo via Syria Relief
Syria Relief runs the National Syrian Project for Prosthetic Limbs in Syria. Photo via Syria Relief

Casualties of the Syrian Civil War

Last year, a horrifying video surfaced on the internet in which a child, Abdel Basit, had both his legs blown apart by a bomb. Since then Basit has been trying to recover with traditionally-made prosthetics. Thousands of children like Basit are suffering from limb loss in Syria. 

Dr Nizamettin said, We travelled to the UK for the sake of Abdel and all the children here.”

The Syria Relief runs several rehabilitation programs for children marred by the Syrian Civil War. Their efforts include funding the largest Syrian hospital Bab Al Hawa Hospital (BHH), and National Syrian Project for Prosthetic Limbs.  

Prosthetics made using traditional methods can be costly and time-consuming. According to Syrian Relief, an above-knee prosthetic limb costs £440 and electronic arm prosthetic, £1000.

It is estimated that over 30,000 have lost limbs in the Syrian conflict. The average number of people per month receiving a prosthetic limb is 60. 

Abdel Basit lost both his legs in the Syrian conflict. Photo via Daily Mail
Abdel Basit lost both his legs in the Syrian conflict. Photo via Daily Mail

3D printing prosthetic limbs

In the past couple of years, 3D printing technology has been utilized to make low-cost prosthetics with good results. The technology has also been a source of relief for war-torn regions and developing countries.

A year ago, the organization, e-NABLE, an open-source prosthetic organization, provided relief to amputees in Haiti with 3D printed prosthetics.

In 2017, Ben Ryan, the founder of prosthetics-for-children project Ambionic, designed and 3D printed a prosthetic for his son, Sol.

In August, a New York-based healthcare NGO, Northwell Health created an amphibious 3D printed prosthetic leg, which eliminates the need to change the prosthetic moving in and out of the water. The NGO aims to make the prosthetic generally available.

Subscribe to our 3D printing newsletter for more news on related to the 3D printing industry, or join us on Facebook and Twitter.

For jobs in the industry, visit out 3D printing job site.

Featured image shows a collection of prosthetics currently used by Syria Relief. Photo via Syria Relief

Josef Prusa introduces a resin-based 3D printer SLA

Josef Prusa, has introduced the resin-based Prusa SL1 – an open source SLA 3D printer. Prusa is the founder and CEO of Prusa Research, which manufactures open-source 3D printers.

Earlier this year, Prusa acquired Futur3D, a Czech company specialising in resin printing, and expanded its team to 320 people. It now aims to develop open-source resin based 3D printers starting with SL1 – this will add to the FDM/FFF range of systems already available.

FFF/FDM technology is based on forcing out molten thermoplastic material (filaments). Whereas, SLA is based on transforming liquid materials to solid parts, layer by layer, by  curing them by using a light source in a process known as photopolymerization. 

Josef Prusa wrote on company’s blog,

“The SL1 isn’t trying to compete with the flimsy Photon or with the ultra-pricey Form but instead I want it to be the MK3 of the resin world – have the best print quality, convenient design and features, ease of use and other things, while keep a price accessible for an everyday hobby maker.”

SLA technology

The three main types of SLA processes are, Laser-based (laser SLA), Digital-light processing (DLP-SLA) and Masked (MSLA).

In all of these processes, a container of photo-reactive liquid resin is exposed to light to create thin solid layers that eventually form a solid object. The Prusa SL1 uses MSLA, with an LED array as a light source in sequence with a LCD photomask to form the light image.

Similar to DLP printers, the LCD photomask is composed of square pixels. The pixel size differs depending on the formation of the LCD photomask and each pixel is deactivated on the LCD to let the LED light pass through and shape the resulting layer. Hence, the XY accuracy is fixed and is independent of how you can scale the lens, in theory meaning MSLA can operate with better accuracy.

In simpler terms, the LCD projects layers as transparent images, while remnant of the image is black, allowing the light to pass only via the transparent layer shape.

Prusa SLA Technology. Photo by Prusa.
Prusa SLA Technology. Photo by Prusa.

Prusa SL1 Tech Specs

The SL1 has a 5.5’’ high-resolution LCD display with the physical resolution of 2560×1440p, developing 0.047 mm per pixel, and a fixed XY resolution. A high-performance UV light cures one layer individually in about 6 seconds and then the printing platform is raised, so the printer can begin forming another layer. This configuration provides a maximum print area size of 120 × 68 × 150 mm (or 4.7 × 2.6 × 5.9 in.).

The printer’s core is a rigid frame with a separate body, which improves stability and reliability. This allows the SL1 reaching a layer height of 0.01 mm. Although, users are recommended to stay within the range of 0.025 – 0.1 mm per layer. The printer has the option of variable layer high and is open to third-part resins.

Trinamic drivers and rigid dural frame. Photo by Prusa.
Trinamic drivers and rigid dural frame. Photo by Prusa.

Tilt bed and resin level sensor

One feature of the SL1 is a unique resin level sensor located in the resin bed (aka ‘tank’). It allows you to pour the required amount of polymer into the tank and informs when the resin is running low and requires a refill.

The sensor is intended to prevent a user from running out of resin mid-print.

There’s also a removable tank with a flexible transparent FEP film on the base. Underneath, there’s a LCD display and the UV light. The printer also features a motorised tilt function in the resin tank, allowing the printer to be not lifted vertically from the bottom of the tank after curing a single layer.

By tilting the tank, the resin is also stirred – which is intended to improve print quality. Prusa also claims that faster printing is possible. Prusa writes,

FEP material is cheap and we will have spare parts available through our e-shop. In case you scratch or damage the FEP film in any way, the replacement is actually pretty easy – just unscrew a couple of screws, remove the damaged film and insert a new one. It will automatically stretch as you tighten the screws again. To compare, Form 2 is using resin tanks with silicone instead of FEP and even the resin tank for “high volume” printing “may last 2 liters+” at a price of $99. You have to bin the whole tank after it stops working.”

 

For more news related to 3D printing and open-source, subscribe to our 3D printing newsletter, or join us on Facebook and Twitter.

If you are looking for a new career, visit 3D Printing Jobs.

Featured image show the Original Prusa SL1 – open source SLA 3D printer. Image via Prusa.

Toronto scientists develop handheld 3D bioprinter to treat burn victims

Scientists from the University of Toronto (UoT) and Sunnybrook Research Institute (SRI), have created a handheld 3D bioprinter capable of printing skin cells to treat deep-thickness wound on burn victims.

According to the research recently published in the Lab on a Chip journal, “When manually positioned above a target surface, the compact instrument [weighing 0.8 kg]conformally deposits a biomaterial or tissue sheet from a microfluidic cartridge.”

Researchers (L-R) Guenther, Hakimi and Cheng, who created the first ‘skin printer’ that can help treat deep skin wounds. Photo via UoT/Liz Do.
Researchers (L-R) Guenther, Hakimi and Cheng, who created the first ‘skin printer’ that can help treat deep skin wounds. (Source: Liz Do)

The ‘first’ handheld bioprinter

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), an estimated 180,000 deaths annually are caused by burns – the vast majority occur in low-and-middle-income countries. Seeking methods to treat burn victims remotely, Navid Hakimi Ph.D. student at UoT, and Dr. Marc G. Jeschke, a Professor of Immunology at UoT and Director of the Ross Tilley Burn Centre at Sunnybrook Hospital led the research of the portable 3D bioprinter.

“Most current 3D bioprinters are bulky, work at low speeds, are expensive and are incompatible with clinical application,” said Dr. Axel Guenther, Associate Professor at UoT’s  Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, who supervised the research project.

Bioprinting versus skin grafting

Skin grafting, the surgical transplantation of skin tissue, requires a significant amount of healthy donor skin to travel across the three layers of the skin on deep wounds – the epidermis, dermis, and hypodermis. Nevertheless, according to the research, large amounts of healthy donor skin is not always available.

With minimal operating training, the handheld bioprinter deposits epidermal and dermal cells as well as a mixture of bio-neutral polymers and proteins for even distribution of the cells layers. This process has the potential to replace skin grafting processes as the “skin” printed can be layered in multiple sessions to heal a deep-thickness wound.

The scientists have also incorporated hyaluronate, a protein found in human connective tissue into the printer model. This protein has the ability to promote healing and integrity among cells and collagen. A test was conducted on agarose (a linear polymer) substrates in in vitro conditions. This process validated the bioink’s ability to be extruded inconsistent narrow sheets with the desired content, width, and thickness.

Following these tests, the team conducted in vivo studies, which applied the entire 3D printer to deep skin wounds in experimental pig and mouse skin. The bioink stripes were able to cover the wounds in their entirety, using various angles. The technology is now being developed for human testing.

The handheld 3D bioprinter depositing skin cells onto a substrate.Clip via UoT.
The handheld 3D bioprinter depositing skin cells onto a substrate.Clip via UoT.

3D printing and wound care

Additive manufacturing has contributed to innovative solutions for medical skin treatments and wound care. Last year, scientists from the VTT Technical Centre of Finland, a state-owned research and development non-profit, have developed a nanostructured cellulose 3D printable smart-dressing and 3D printed circuit board that heals and monitors skin wounds.

Prior to this, a research team at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) in Korea, developed a skin 3D bioprinting process which uses extrusion-based and inkjet printing depositing advanced bioink materials. This method accelerated the growth of tissues in the layers of human skin, demonstrating a substantial skin culture in 2 weeks.

The research paper, “Handheld skin printer: in situ formation of planar biomaterials and tissues” was co-authored by Navid Hakimi, Richard Cheng, Lian Leng, Mohammad Sotoudehfar, Phoenix Qing Ba, Nazihah Bakhtyar, Saeid Amini-Nik, Dr. Marc G. Jeschke, and Axel Guenther.

Stay updated with the latest scientific developments in 3D printing by subscribing to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Searching for new talent or seeking a career change? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows the handheld 3D bioprinter depositing skin cells onto a substrate.Clip via UoT.

Airbus Helicopters commences production of large 3D printed parts for A350 aircraft

Airbus Helicopters, the helicopter manufacturing division of Airbus, has announced the commencement of large-scale production of 3D printed latch shafts for its A350 aircraft in its Donauwörth, Germany facility.

The latch shafts, which are used for the doors of the helicopter, are redesigned with lightweight properties and are manufactured using an EOS M 400-4 printer. Luis Martin Diaz, Head of Industrial Service Centers, Airbus Helicopters Donauwörth stated:

“Weight savings are especially important when it comes to helicopters. 3D printing should be taken into consideration right from the initial planning stages for new components, which may be able to be manufactured particularly easily and cost-effectively using this method.”

From left to right: Andreas Stöckle, Head of Industrial Site Airbus Helicopters Donauwörth, Bruno Even, CEO Airbus Helicopters, Christian Cornille, Head of Industry Airbus Helicopters do the ribbon cutting for the industrial metallic 3D printing at Airbus Helicopters in Donauwörth. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.
From left to right: Andreas Stöckle, Head of Industrial Site Airbus Helicopters Donauwörth, Bruno Even, CEO Airbus Helicopters, Christian Cornille, Head of Industry Airbus Helicopters do the ribbon cutting for the industrial metallic 3D printing at Airbus Helicopters in Donauwörth. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.

Metal 3D printed helicopter latch shafts

With the EOS M 400-4’s four laser beam system, Airbus Helicopters are able to produce latch shafts 45% lighter and 25% cheaper than its conventional counterpart. The titanium powder used within laser sintering technology, also allows the parts to be created from much less material while maintaining the sturdiness of the original component. The company is also preparing to produce a larger group of A350 door components using 3D printing.

Furthermore, the EOS system can manufacture up to 28 latch shafts in just a single printing process. Considering that each A350 aircraft requires 16 latch shafts, producing these parts using 3D printing leads to a saving of just over four kilos per aircraft, according to Airbus Helicopters.

“Our systems provide a very high and reproducible quality. With this machine performance and with our know-how we can significantly support Airbus Helicopters in the certification process for the component,” said Nikolai Zaepernick, Senior Vice President Central Europe with EOS.

Once production is fully operational, Airbus Helicopters intends to deliver 2,200 components per year. In addition, qualification is scheduled to be completed at the end of this year with serial production starting in early 2019. Moreover, the first A350 components – with serial number 420 – are expected to “take to the skies” in 2020.

3D printed prototypes latch compenets. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.
3D printed prototypes latch components. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.

Airbus further integrates 3D printed aircraft components

Last year, Airbus installed 3D printed titanium brackets on its in-series production A350 XWB aircraft. Prior to this, the Airbus announced that this aircraft contained over 1,000 3D printed parts on board, which demonstrates the progress made from the aerospace pioneer in additive manufacturing. Furthermore, earlier this year, Airbus in partnership with Belgium’s Materialise, developed 3D printed spacer panels for the cabin of Finland’s largest airline, Finnair’s A320 aircraft.  

Finished 3D printed latch components. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.
Finished 3D printed latch components. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.

Keep up with Airbus’ progress as well as the latest 3D printing news by subscribing to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Searching for new talent or seeking a career change? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows 3D printed latch components. Photo via Airbus Helicopters.

Additive experts give verdict on IMTS and the industrialization of 3D printing

IMTS 2018 set all time records for attendance and exhibit space. At this years event it was evident that additive manufacturing is increasingly finding application within the wider manufacturing universe.

Peter R. Eelman, Vice President, VP of organizers AMT describes AM as “one of the most revolutionary technologies ever brought to IMTS” with an “unprecedented degree of collaboration among exhibitors to develop additive manufacturing, automation and connected systems.”

A 3D printing robot by Titan Robotics and Yaskawa at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.
A 3D printing robot by Titan Robotics and Yaskawa at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

Visitors to last week’s Chicago event were able to see AM in each of the four halls, and a dedicated Additive Manufacturing Pavillon where 51 companies from the 3D printing industry were exhibiting.

I caught up with some of the leading enterprises at IMTS to find out more about the trends at IMTS, how AM fits into the manufacturing world and where further work is required.

IMTS 2018 occupied all four building of McCormick Place. Photo by Michael Petch.
IMTS 2018 occupied all four building of McCormick Place. Photo by Michael Petch.

3D Printing Industry: Did you see any particular trends at IMTS, what were these and how do they relate to your company?

Bertrand Humel van der Lee, Chief Customer Operations Officer (CCOO) at EOS.

In terms of additive manufacturing, there was a lot of interest from attendees around production level 3D printing, especially at the metal printing level. There was almost immediate commercial interest in our EOS M 300 system, which we launched at the show. Overall, there are a lot of companies and our own customers looking to go to the next level with their 3D printing capabilities.

The conversations we’re having with current and potential customers at the show are changing as well. As production moves to more customized, shorter-term product cycles, the manufacturers we’re working with are finding immediate value in bringing in more machines. We’re having discussions with customers on how they can change their entire production process with 3D printing.

Aurélien Mouliets, Community Manager, AddUp.

IMTS 2018 saw a shift in manufacturers’ interest. Decision-makers begin to realise that industrial 3D printing is not “just a fad”. It is there to stay and to let industrials produce complementary, complex parts, at a fraction of the usual cost. It is great to see that we are not in the early-adoption phase anymore, but at the start of an arms race to decide who will outpace the competition thanks to additive manufacturing.

Scott Sevcik, VP of Manufacturing Solutions at Stratasys.

Clearly the industry is maturing.  IMTS had a much larger additive presence this year, but at the same time it was much more focused.  There’s a dozen additive technologies, and each have their fit. What we saw at IMTS was much more focus on the 4 or 5 additive technologies that have a real ability to impact manufacturing directly.  Instead of a dedicated focus on Rapid Prototyping, which has been the mainstay for 3D printing, what we saw was RP being presented as one manufacturing application that reduces development time and cost and Rapid Tooling and production applications being showcased for their unique additive value as well.

Stratasys demonstrated carbon fiber 3D printing for Team Penske at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.
Stratasys demonstrated carbon fiber 3D printing for Team Penske at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

Franziska Maschowski, Industry Manager for Additive Manufacturing at TRUMPF Inc.

More focus on industrialization of the (metal) AM process which is very encouraging since TRUMPF has been driving this for several years.

Daan A.J. Kersten, Co-founder and CEO of Additive Industries.

We have seen a growing number of informed potential customers enquiring for true industrial additive manufacturing solutions. They zoom in on topics like productivity, OEE and other production tool metrics. This aligns well with our integrated systems, designed for industrial production.

Doug Vaughan, Senior Vice President of Marketing at 3D Systems.

From my perspective, the big trend was around the factory of the future and the disruptive technologies driving the promise of Industry 4.0.  Additive manufacturing – along with artificial intelligence, advanced robotics, big data and other disruptive technologies – is driving the digital transformation of manufacturing and you could see that coming to life at IMTS.  Looking back at IMTS 2016, there was a lot of talk around vision and the possibilities. This year, there were actual relevant demonstrations of these disruptive technologies.

Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry.

Through our conversations, we saw a need for flexibility on specifications, quantities, and shop capacity. Manufacturers must adapt to varying demand from one-offs to production while juggling internal capacity. The only way to achieve this is through technology, including integrated marketplaces like Xometry’s online pricing and partner network solutions. We provide the work without heavy lifting, and the partner gets to take on projects that best fit their capabilities. We also continued to see significant numbers of people looking for manufacturing on demand in general. This is at the core of Xometry’s business model – providing fast, high-quality, and cost effective manufacturing on demand.

Mary Li, Supervisor Industrial Product Line at SHINING 3D.

From this year’s IMTS 2018, we can see that additive manufacturing is gradually turning its focus from prototyping toward direct production.  While high property performance, high speed, and productive capability are the obvious trend features for AM, which have been adopted widely in different application and industries, such as aerospace, automotive, shoe, medical, molding, etc. To ensure a successful development of AM, it requires a closer cooperation among hardware, materials and software companies.

The 3D printed autonomous vehicle Olli at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.
The 3D printed autonomous vehicle Olli at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

3D Printing Industry: What is your perspective on how additive manufacturing featured at IMTS 2018, how has this changed since the previous show in 2016?

Bertrand Humel van der Lee, Chief Customer Operations Officer (CCOO) at EOS.

Companies now understand that additive manufacturing is imperative for their business to remain successful and competitive. It is not about the technology in general, but about specific applications and solutions.

At IMTS this year, there was an emphasis on more practical applications of 3D printing rather than in years prior where there was a lot of hype. It’s not just taken more seriously; manufacturers are seeing the need to up their investments in additive manufacturing, both from a technology and knowledge perspective.

This year the additive manufacturing area of IMTS attracted more interest than ever. This is testament to the momentum additive manufacturing technology is gaining, as well as a change in mindset from key decision makers. The questions we receive are now less about the technology itself, but rather how best to approach 3D printing for specific applications.

The EOS portfolio for production. Photo by Michael Petch.
The EOS portfolio for production. Photo by Michael Petch.

Aurélien Mouliets, Community Manager, AddUp

IMTS 2018 and 2016 were very different. Back in 2016, Additive Manufacturing seemed by many like an attempt to use a hobby tool to produce parts at an industrial level. Now visitors realise that this is not only possible, but worth an investment. Perhaps seeing a corporation like Michelin producing over a million complex lamellae and market-decisive moulds thanks to AddUp’s production systems has opened eyes on the usability of this technology.

Scott Sevcik, VP of Manufacturing Solutions at Stratasys.  

It’s incredible to see how the show has evolved over the past several years. Only a few of shows ago, additive was a blip on the radar. Two years ago, was a bit of a coming out party. We were showing demonstrators, new capabilities, and new directions for the industry.

This year, Additive had a significant presence in a main hall, and I believe the industry showed a new level of maturity. While there were a few distant, directional announcements, they were much fewer. Instead of talking about what could be, we were showing what is. This was certainly our focus at Stratasys.

We highlighted real applications from real customers who are using additive day to day to move faster, be more flexible, and attack new business models.

Daan A.J. Kersten, Co-founder and CEO of Additive Industries

Additive manufacturing has grown and was besides the AM pavilion more distributed across the various machine tool halls.

Additive Industries CEO Daan Kersten. Photo by Michael Petch.
Additive Industries CEO Daan Kersten. Photo by Michael Petch.

Doug Vaughan, Senior Vice President of Marketing at 3D Systems

2018 will go down as the year Additive Manufacturing found a true home at IMTS.  The presence of Additive was night and day from 2 years ago – not only was the Additive area 2-3X larger than 2016, but the foot traffic and interest level was even higher.  

You also began to see Additive technologies present in other pavilions and booths throughout the show.  With that said, Additive is still a relatively small part of the overall show, so I am looking forward to an even larger Additive presence at IMTS 2020. It should be exciting to see.

Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry

Every year we see additive manufacturing play more of a role in customized, purpose-built, manufacturing. The power of prototyping will always be a strength of 3D printing, but with newer technologies coming out there is a significant grab for traditional production markets like die-casting and metal injection mold.

Mary Li, Supervisor Industrial Product Line at SHINING 3D

With an increasing amount of metal 3D printing manufacturers appearing at IMTS 2018, additive manufacturing is aiming to direct the production with high requirements of the parts property.

3D Printing Industry: In your opinion, what are the main challenges for AM to overcome if the technology is to become a true industrial process?

Bertrand Humel van der Lee, Chief Customer Operations Officer (CCOO) at EOS.

The seamless integration of 3D printing into existing production environments, the combination of industrial 3D printing with conventional production technologies, and the continuous optimisation of part and data flow are also elementary requirements.

It’s about the digital interconnectivity of conventional and additive technologies to further optimise the quality and cost of the manufactured parts and applications. With this in mind, users and technology providers of industrial 3D printing solutions are focusing on topics like quality control, scalability, automation, software integration, security and, of course, total cost of ownership.

But the availability of the right technical equipment, the necessary interfaces and the automation part flow are not the only factors of success. The development of know-how and experience within a company is equally important as to leverage the full potential of industrial 3D printing.

A 3D printed titanium golf driver head made by EOS for Wilson. Photo by Michael Petch.
A 3D printed titanium golf driver head made by EOS for Wilson. Photo by Michael Petch.

Aurélien Mouliets, Community Manager, AddUp

AM is already a true industrial process for AddUp. The main challenge to overcome is the anxiety in shifting from well-known, centuries-long industrial processes to a new technology and equipment used for a few decades only. Evangelising the 3D printing technology as a whole is still very important. That is why we are working on producing educational content through AddUp Academy to help companies in their transformation. AddUp Academy’s training is available online.

Scott Sevcik, VP of Manufacturing Solutions at Stratasys.

Confidence in the technology is key. For traditional technologies, you can just grab a handbook and look up a design value. Not being able to trust Additive technology to be highly repeatable is a key barrier to adoption in production processes. That’s been our focus with the F900, and it’s paying off.  

All the discussion of additive metals lately has drawn a ton of interest, but customers are quickly realizing that highly repeatable, certifiable, metals processes are just emerging and there are still a lot of question marks.  

Those same customers drawn in by talk of metals, are now finding what we’ve been able to do with 30 years of maturity with FDM. The level of repeatability improvement we accomplished is so pronounced that we’re been able to adopt composites-style characterization processes and now have an SAE spec about to release. That’s key.  

The establishment of specs and standards is a clear sign of where we have reached maturity and industrialization of Additive.

A Stratasys Robotic Composite radome at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.
A Stratasys Robotic Composite radome at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

Franziska Maschowski, Industry Manager for Additive Manufacturing at TRUMPF Inc.

The industry has to push the development of standards for the different technologies to make AM more accepted in production processes.

Important to increase the productivity along the entire AM process chain. The focus shouldn’t be on the machines alone but also on pre- and post-processing steps. [The industry needs to ] promote digitization / connectivity of machines and systems

Daan A.J. Kersten, Co-founder and CEO of Additive Industries

We should follow a more structured approach to design for AM and actual production and stop improvising by prototyping.

Doug Vaughan, Senior Vice President of Marketing at 3D Systems

Main challenges are awareness and training. Additive as a technology is at the early adopter stage and will require improved market awareness and training to increase adoption and deployment as a true industrial process. The industry has made tremendous progress during the past 2 years, but there is a lot more work to be done to accelerate the growth and promise we all see in Additive.  

Making production real with the 3D Systems figure 4. Photo by Michael Petch.
Making production real with the 3D Systems figure 4. Photo by Michael Petch.

Greg Paulsen, Director of Applications Engineering at Xometry

Material availability, surface finish, production scalability, and accuracy are always the main drivers of when to choose traditional processes over additive. Although some technologies do better at bridging the gap, we still see a large number of subtractive components in most assemblies that have additive parts. Xometry demonstrated this with showcased fixturing used on the BMW assembly line, where most conformal end-effectors were additive, but many of the high-wear components require machining or casting.

Oscar Meza VP of Global Sales at SHINING 3D

The lack of understanding of the manufacturing workflow and process. Most players in the AM industry don’t have experience in actual manufacturing, but rather rapid-prototyping and conceptualization. There is also a lack of knowledge and understanding of the use of CAD & 3D scanning in driving the additive manufacturing process in a real manufacturing environment. All AM companies assume that users already have a CAD model they want to print, but don’t offer the possibility of generating new CAD models, modify or reverse engineer models for production.

Further insights from IMTS 2018

Tim Rose, VP of Business Development and Marketing, Identify3D

There has been great progress overcoming the challenges of cost and efficiency of industrial additive machines since IMTS ’16 but I see continued resistance for full adoption of AM technology stemming from certification, standardization, and cybersecurity. However, IMTS ’18 did deliver solutions to address the challenges of process consistency, traceability, and data security throughout the digital supply chain that will enable the continued advancement and subsequent adoption of AM for full production manufacturing.

Aurélien Mouliets, Community Manager, AddUp

We are happy to see that US companies now come with business cases, projects and complex questions about additive, compared to the 2016 show. Moreover, US corporations are definitely thinking about implementing 3D printing as a real industrial tool, with full lines of production, as additive manufacturing and subtractive manufacturing complement one another.

The closing word goes to AMT’s Peter R. Eelman, “Every building in McCormick Place featured AM technology,” he says. “Four years ago when we produced the Strati vehicle on the show floor, large-scale AM was a novelty. At IMTS 2018, AM technology was part of the manufacturing processes used to produce the entrance hall impact units.”

The additive manufacturing conference and expo season is well underway and 3D Printing Industry will be at all the major shows. If you’d like to meet our reporters during these events please get in contact.

A view of Lake Michigan from the East Hall at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.
A view of Lake Michigan from the East Hall at IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

Get all the latest 3D printing news direct to your inbox, subscribe to the free  3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a new job in the additive manufacturing industry? Seeking new talent for your business? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Toronto scientists create (generic term) hand-held 3D bioprinter to dainty burning victims

<![CDATA[

Scientists from the body (generic term) of Toronto (UoT) and Sunnybrook investigation (generic term) association (generic term) (SRI), rich person created a handheld 3D bioprinter able of writing (generic term) tegument cells to dainty deep-thickness coiled on burning victims. reported to the investigation (generic term) late published in the Lab on a Chip journal, “When manually positioned preceding a mark surface, the clayey device (generic term) [weighing 0.8 … Continue reading “Toronto scientists develop handheld 3D bioprinter to dainty burning victims”

The post Toronto scientists develop handheld 3D bioprinter to dainty burning victims appeared first on 3dprinter.in.

]]>
source :http://www.3dprinter.in/feed/

Airbus Helicopters commences industry (generic term) of big 3D written environment (generic term) for A350 craft (generic term)

<![CDATA[

Airbus Helicopters, the helicopter manufacturing division of airliner (generic term), has announced the beginning of big-scale industry (generic term) of 3D written door latch shafts for its A350 aircraft in its Donauwörth, Germany facility. The door latch shafts, which are in use for the doors of the helicopter, are redesigned with lightweight properties and are factory-made exploitation an EOS M 400-4 printer. Luis Martin … Continue linguistic process (generic term) “Airbus Helicopters commences industry (generic term) of big 3D written environment (generic term) for A350 aircraft”

The station Airbus Helicopters commences industry (generic term) of big 3D written environment (generic term) for A350 aircraft appeared archetypal on 3dprinter.in.

]]>
source :http://www.3dprinter.in/feed/