Arconic announces multiple aerospace deals, Lockheed Martin joint development agreement

3D printing news about the aerospace sector is set to dominate the agenda this week as the Farnborough International Airshow gets underway. GE Additive and GKN have already made announcements, and now a batch of news from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania based Arconic has just been announced.

Lockheed Martin and Arconic sign Joint Development Agreement

A freshly inked deal between Lockheed Martin and Arconic aims to develop “customized lightweight material systems and advanced manufacturing processes, such as metal 3D printing, to advance current and next-generation aerospace and defense solutions—including new structures and systems not currently in existence.”

3D Printing Industry readers will recall how Arconic is focused on industrializing metal 3D printing, specifically looking at the production of aerospace components on a large-scale. This has seen Arconic use metal additive manufacturing to produce fuselage parts for Airbus and make a $60 million investment in developing metal powder production facilities.

The new Joint Development Agreement sets out how over a two-year period Lockheed Martin and Arconic will work together on advanced materials and manufacturing for aerospace.

3D printed brackets for the Juno mission. Photo by Michael Petch.
3D printed brackets for the Lockheed Juno mission. Photo by Michael Petch.

Rod Makoske, Lockheed Martin SVP of Corporate Engineering, Technology and Operations, said, “At Lockheed Martin, we are relentlessly finding ways to develop materials that create state-of-the-art advanced capabilities, reduce waste and generate efficiencies in manufacturing practices.”

“Collaborating with Arconic will help us uncover new ideas for materials development where traditional practices aren’t suitable, investigate more sustainable material compositions and find ways to produce materials more effectively.”

In the past Arconic has supplied Lockheed Martin with range of aerospace components. These include products for the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, spanning engine to airframe, and also metal additive manufactured components used on NASA’s Orion spacecraft.

Ray Kilmer, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Arconic, “We have a long history of innovative collaboration with Lockheed Martin across multiple platforms—from single-piece forged bulkheads for the F-35 to 3D printed parts for the Orion spacecraft—and we are pleased to expand on that relationship with this new agreement.”

 “Lockheed is always innovating, and it is a privilege to apply our materials and manufacturing expertise to help them deliver their next generation of cutting-edge products.”

An Arconic-designed, optimized aerospace bracket. Photo via Arconic.
An Arconic-designed, optimized aerospace bracket. Photo via Arconic.

A day of aerospace news from Arconic

In 2017, Arconic reported revenues greater than $5b billion for their aerospace business. In addition to the Lockheed Martin news, the company has made several other announcements.

Other news from Arconic today see the signing of the company’s longest contract to date with Boeing. The multi-year deal extends the previous business relationship whereby the two companies collaborate on the production of wing skins, polished fuselage skins and wing ribs for metallic structure airplanes. Additionally Arconic will now supply Boeing with material for airplanes based on carbon fiber platforms, for example the 787 and 777X.

“This agreement demonstrates Arconic’s commitment to deliver quality and innovation to our customers,” said Tim Myers, President of Arconic Global Rolled Products and Transportation and Construction Solutions. “We’re proud of our more than 40 years of collaboration with Boeing, and we look forward to playing a role in their continued success.”

Furthermore, a new titanium alloy for high temperature aerospace applications was announced. The material is called ARCONIC-THOR and is “nearly 50 percent lighter than incumbent nickel-based superalloys.”

“ARCONIC-THOR is a breakthrough aerospace material that goes where conventional titanium alloys cannot,” said Jeremy Halford, President, Arconic Engineered Structures. “Next generation fuel-efficient aero engines are running hotter, presenting a materials challenge for the exhaust systems and adjacent structures. Drawing on our materials science expertise, our engineers formulated ARCONIC-THOR—a powerful titanium solution that can take the heat and unlock significant weight and cost savings for our customers.”

3D Printing Industry will be at the Farnborough International Airshow all week. Get in touch if you’d like to talk about industrial 3D printing in the aerospace sector.

For all the latest 3D printing news, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

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Featured image shows Arconic additive manufacturing. Photo by Michael Petch.

GE Additive launches Manufacturing Partner Network with Protolabs, Carpenter and Burloak

More 3D printing news from this week’s Farnborough International Airshow as GE Additive launches a Manufacturing Partner Network (MPN).

The MPN is described by GE Additive as an “Ecosystem approach” that will create “an open, competitive market”. The goal of the MPN is to tackle several issues the 3D printing industry must resolve before the next inflection point can be reached.

Specifically, how to help customers additively manufacture components at a higher volume.

As our series looking at trends in additive manufacturing for end-use production noted these issues are multiple, and faced by many across the industry. Challenges include access to hardware, funding and expertise. A further challenge, says GE Additive, is seen in the current level of demand for industrial 3D printed components.

Jason Oliver, President & CEO, GE Additive, said, “We know first hand that the transition from prototyping to volume production is possibly the biggest step on any company’s additive journey and that can be daunting. The MPN is designed to give companies a range of options to help them progress and continue innovating by connecting them with a choice of trusted additive production partners to give them peace of mind, in a cost-efficient way.”

A GE engineer removing metal powder from a Concept Laser additive manufacturing system. Photo via GE Additive,
A GE engineer working

Proto Labs, Burloak and Carpenter named as initial partners in GE network

The MPN will include a range of Manufacturing Partners or MPs. Initial MPs were announced today as Burloak Technologies, Carpenter Co and Proto Labs Inc.

GE Additive expects partners to benefit from membership of the network in several ways. These include increased demand for MP services via “revenue opportunities” created by the GE Additive sales team, knowledge sharing and access to GE’s 150 consultants under the AddWorks brand and support in co-marketing campaigns – including the use of GE branding.

While the MPN is intended to service customers who require high volumes of 3D printed components, the GE Additive Customer Experience Centers in Munich and Pittsburg will serve as a sales funnel. These centers will, “act as a bridge to the MPN, which is a natural extension for those customers ready to take the next step.”

Peter Adams, Co-founder and President of Burloak Technologies, said,  “Burloak Technologies is proud to be a launch partner for GE’s Manufacturing Partner Network.”

 “We have developed a strategic plan for the industrialization of additive manufacturing. Our participation in GE’s MPN strengthens this plan and will allow us to accelerate the the adoption of additive manufacturing in the market.”

Burloak also recently announced construction of a new $80M (C$104M) Additive Manufacturing Center of Excellence, where it will continue to invest in the technologies and equipment to position itself to produce parts from start to finish. Commencing in Q3’2018 Burloak will purchase  GE Additive equipment, materials, software and technology. This investment will be used both by Burloak and also for “offload capacity for GE’s additive manufacturing requirements.”

Protolabs has a sizeable manufacturing capacity and in addition to 3D printing offers injection molding and CNC milling. Spanning 750,000 square feet at multiple sites in Europe and North America Protolabs has over 600 CNC mills, 225+ injection molding presses and 150+ industrial additive manufacturing machines. The Maple Plain, Minnesota based company generated  $344.5 million in revenues during 2017 and now has tens of tens of thousands of customers in over 160 countries.

Vicki Holt, President and Chief Executive Officer.
Vicki Holt, President and Chief Executive Officer of Protolabs. Photo via Protolabs

“We take pride in having been in the additive manufacturing industry for nearly 20 years, and we are excited to partner with GE Additive to further advance and democratize access to industrial-grade additive manufacturing technologies and materials,” said Vicki Holt, President and CEO, Protolabs.

Jason Oliver, President and CEO, GE Additive, added“We already enjoy a strong relationship with Protolabs, so I’m thrilled that they will part of the MPN from day one. We share a similar set of beliefs around providing access to technology and experts, the transformative impact of additive and the power of collaboration and ecosystems.”

3D Printing Industry will be at the Farnborough International Airshow all week. Get in touch if you’d like to talk about industrial 3D printing in the aerospace sector.

For all the latest 3D printing news, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Make your next additive manufacturing career move or hire new talent. Search and post 3D Printing Jobs on our free jobs service.

Featured image shows the GE Additive and Burloak Signing. Photo via GE Additive.

New MyMiniFactory, Dremel and MakeAnything 3D printing challenge

YouTuber Devin Montes has teamed up with MyMiniFactory and 3D printer manufacturer Dremel for a design challenge based on 3D Puzzles.

Devin Montes began 3D printing at a young age, and went on to study Product Design. He runs a Youtube channel MakeAnything on which he walks through his 3D designs and demonstrates the processes he uses. Devin shares his 3D printable designs exclusively on MyMiniFactory, and though he has only been on MyMiniFactory for a year, he has quickly become one of the most popular designers on the platform.

Winners of the design challenge

In the first design challenge, participants had to create a 3D puzzle. Devin provided a variety of puzzles he has already made as inspiration, along with tutorials on ‘Making 3D puzzles’ and ‘Making Puzzle Cubes’, to ensure the competition was accessible to novices and experts alike.

Devin has printed and reviewed his favourite entries on his channel. The winners were announced last week and feature in his ‘Puzzle Competition Entries and Results’.

The overall winner of the design challenge was ChadTarbutton, designer of the Twisted Maze Puzzle.  The runner ups included Galil’s GearBlock Puzzle, Timur’s ‘Tatar Ornament decorative panno’ and Ander’s Puzzle Lock / Sliding Puzzle, which Devin credited as original and clever.

ChadTarbutton will receive a Dremel Digilab 3D45 FFF/FDM 3D printer. The 3D45 was released earlier in 2018 and features a heated bed and a high-temperature extruder that processes multiple types of filament, such as Nylon and Eco-ABS.

The 3D45 uses RFID filament recognition and automatically adjusts printing settings to match the filament. Users can monitor and control 3D prints remotely using the Wi-Fi-enabled system and HD camera. The camera can also be used to create time-lapse videos. The Dremel 3D45 was also developed with Bosch sensor technology and has UL certification.

Just 3D print to win

Now, MyMiniFactory and Devin are hosting an additional challenge with 3D printing material up for grabs. To enter, users must print out their favourite competition entry and upload a picture of their print on the platform. This mini-competition ends on Wednesday 18th July 2018 and the best user uploaded picture will win a spool of Dremel Filament.

Click here to enter the competition.

For all the latest 3D printing news, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Make your next additive manufacturing career move or hire new talent. Search and post 3D Printing Jobs on our free jobs service.

Featured image shows the Dremel Digilab 3D45 3D printer. Photo by Rushabh Haria.

New 3D printing jobs at Clariant, CDJ Technologies, Novatech, INTAMSYS and Formlabs

The demand for 3D printing jobs is increasing, at least that is what the rapidly growing number of users on the our 3D Printing Industry jobs service indicates.

In the past week alone more than thirty jobs in the 3D printing industry were posted. New additive manufacturing positions include dental 3D printing specialists, material scientists, software engineers for 3D printers and a wide range of positions supporting the growing sector.

Matching this increase in 3D printing jobs, is a rise in the number of applicants registered on our site. Create your own free profile and find a job in the 3D printing industry now.

Here is a sample of some of the latest positions.

3D Printing Industry Jobs Board
3D Printing Industry Jobs Board

3D printing jobs Formlabs, Berlin, Germany

Fancy moving to Berlin, or already live there? If you want to work with one of the best known names in 3D printing a job at Formlabs could be for you. The company is recruiting for a large number of positions including a Sales Operations Analyst, 3D printing Channel Sales Manager (DACH), and an EMEA PR & Communications Manager.

To view these jobs and more, visit the Formlabs employer profile on the 3D Printing Industry jobs site.

If you want to hire 3D printing specialists, then create your own free employer profile now.

A Demogorgon model emerges from a Formlabs SLA printer. Photo via Formlabs.
A Demogorgon model emerges from a Formlabs SLA printer. Photo via Formlabs.

Senior Graphic Designer at INTAMSYS, Shanghai, China

Not all jobs in the 3D printing industry require engineering qualifications or material science skills. INTAMSYS is the developer of a range of industrial 3D printing systems and is seeking a senior graphic designer to join their team.

The senior graphic design is responsible for the execution and on-time delivery of high impact creative materials to support major global marketing initiatives and product launches. Projects will cover a wide spectrum, ranging from company branding to promotional events and exhibitions, as well as other marketing materials to support current and future projects.

Learn more about this 3D printing job.

A completed fixture 3D printed by INTAMSYS.
A completed fixture 3D printed by INTAMSYS.

Sr. Software Engineer at CDJ Technologies, Evanston, IL, USA

CDJ Technologies, Inc. is a stereolithographic additive manufacturing company founded to pursue high speed, large scale 3D printing for manufacturing.

The company is recruiting for a range of positions including a senior software engineer. Responsibilities include leading the development team for software development, coordinating with the senior hardware engineer, managing software consulting contracts, developing RFP specs, management of contracts, and integration of delivered content.

Qualification requirements include a BS degree in Computer Science or relevant programs with past work portfolio important, 2-6 years experience in cloud-based solutions and software/hardware integration and computational modeling, complex analysis, and CAD skills preferred.

Equity participation may be available for the right candidate. Apply for this job now.

Other 3D printing jobs at the company include a Resin Formulation Chemist and Mechanical Engineer. Learn more about CDJ Technologies and the other additive manufacturing positions they are hiring.

3D Printing Engineer at Clariant, Guangzhou, Guangdong, China

Clariant is an increasingly familiar name in the 3D printing industry. The global speciality chemicals company is now expanding the recently established global Additive Manufacturing team and is seeking to hire a 3D printing engineer.

This is a role that will “directly impact development of new materials for a very dynamic area of technology,” says the company. The duties of this 3D printing job include the creation and optimization of an innovative range of 3D printing materials, the evaluation of new materials and working with state of the art material evaluation and testing methods.

Applicants for the 3D printing engineer should be a graduate in the field of engineering or natural sciences, experienced working in a team environment to test and development materials and products and preferably have CAD or 3D slicing software knowledge.

To see the full details, and apply for this 3D printing position click here.

Clariant's existing R&D capabilities include industrial inkjet printing. Photo via Clariant.
Clariant’s existing R&D capabilities include industrial inkjet printing. Photo via Clariant.

National 3D Sales Manager at Novatech, Nashville, TN, USA

Based in Nashville, Novatech, Inc. has 12 branches throughout the South and generated revenues of $84 million in 2017. The company is a reseller of 3D printers and 3D scanners, including Markforged, HP and Creaform.

Novatech is looking for a National 3D Sales Manager who will ideally be based in the Nashville area.

Responsibilities of the 3D printing sales manager include the development of new accounts, staying up to date with 3D printing news, management duties and the development of compensation, incentive and promotion plans.

The successful candidate is likely to have prior experience managing a successful sales team and experience selling 3D products.

Learn more about this position as a National 3D Sales Manager.

It’s free to post jobs and apply for 3D printing jobs. Create a profile on the 3D Printing Industry jobs site now.

For all the latest 3D printing news, subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Make your next additive manufacturing career move or hire new talent. Search and post 3D Printing Jobs on our free jobs service.

Stanley Black & Decker and Techstars additive manufacturing accelerator class start-ups announced

Techstars, a Colorado-based venture capitalist firm, and Stanley Black & Decker, tool manufacturers with brands including DeWalt, have announced the first ten companies to be selected for the additive manufacturing accelerator, aka Techstars Class 131.

The STANLEY+Techstars Accelerator support and mentorship program launched in late 2017, with the aim to bring new technologies to the market with the help of 3D printing.

As part of Techstars Class 131, located at Stanley Black & Decker’s advanced manufacturing center in Hartford, Connecticut,  the ten companies will receive funding towards new innovations in 3D printing, rapid prototyping, and generative design.

“Advances in materials and hardware allow for innovation and disruption in manufacturing,” stated Claudia Reuter, Techstars’ managing director of the new additive manufacturing accelerator.

“We were looking across the spectrum of what startups out there were doing.”

The Stanley Black & Decker’s advanced manufacturing center in Hartford, Connecticut. Photo via Stanley Black & Decker.
The Stanley Black & Decker’s advanced manufacturing center in Hartford, Connecticut. Photo via Stanley Black & Decker.

The Techstars Class 131

According to Tim Hatch, Chief Technology Officer at Stanley Engineered Fastening (SEF), Stanley Black & Decker has been on a 30-year mission to find new ways to implement additive manufacturing in the production process.

With this mission, Stanley Black & Decker, partnered with Techstars, who have provided seed funding for over 1500 technology startups.

After sifting through an undisclosed amount of applications spanning across 11 countries, Reuter has finalized ten startups from Ireland, Israel, Canada, and the U.S.

The participants include Micron3DP, an Israel-based company developing high-speed metal 3D printers.

MetalMaker 3D, a Connecticut-based company developing an affordable and scalable solution for metal additive manufacturing.

Calt Dynamics, an Ireland-based company creating socially beneficial 3D Printing Technology.

Structure3D Printing, an Ontario-based company developing soft 3D printing materials beyond plastic filaments.

Inventaprint, a New York-based product development platform for the hardware space.

Astroprint, a San Diego-based company providing a cloud platform empowering creators with 3D printers.

Kwambio, a New York-based ceramics 3D printing company.

NanoQuan, a Canadian company developing advanced nanomaterials.

Mani.me, a California-based manufacturer of ready-to-wear 3D printed nails,

And finally, Castor Technologies, an Israel-based company developing intelligent 3D printing software for manufacturing.

“[I] am proud of the strength of the companies and the diversity of their offerings and teams and am confident that this is going to be an amazing year for the companies, for the city of Hartford, for Stanley Black & Decker, and for Techstars!” said Reuter.

The Techstars team at a Demo Day for the Paris Accelerator program. Photo via Techstars.
The Techstars team at a Demo Day for the Paris Accelerator program. Photo via Techstars.

Resources within the STANLEY+Techstars Accelerator

All ten participants will be given $20,000 in funding in exchange for 6% of the company’s common stock and will be offered a $100,000 convertible note.

In addition,  the participants will receive access to a range of 3D printing resources available at the Stanley Black & Decker’s advanced manufacturing center.

Prior to this partnership, Stanley Black & Decker streamlined its product production by implementing Autodesk generative design software to redesign a hydraulic crimper.

The partnership with Stanley Black & Decker is expected to have two more classes which will take place in the summer of 2019 and again in 2020.

Keep up with the latest 3D printing news by subscribing to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a change of pace? Seeking new talent for your business? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows the Stanley Black & Decker’s advanced manufacturing center in Hartford, Connecticut. Photo via Stanley Black & Decker.

Norsk Titanium starts qualification of 3D printed production at Spirit

In advancement of a commercial agreement inked in July 2017, Norsk Titanium has initiated the qualification of the first additive manufactured part for Spirit AeroSystems (MYSE:SPR). With this move, Norsk has achieved validation for the production and industrialization of its Rapid Plasma Deposition (RPD) process.

Mike Canario, CEO of Norsk Titanium, comments, “I am very proud of the Norsk Titanium team and this accomplishment. It represents years of technology development. I also would also like to thank Spirit for this vote of confidence in the Norsk RPD™ process and capability.”

The Rapid Plasma Deposition process involving wired metal feedstock and argon gas. Image via Norsk Titanium.
Norsk’s Rapid Plasma Deposition process involved wired metal feedstock and argon gas. Photo via Norsk Titanium.

Structural 3D printed parts for the Boeing 787 

Spirit AeroSystems, the world’s largest first-tier aerostructures manufacturer, has been working on RPD 3D printing with Norsk Titanium since 2008.

In 2017, RPD 3D printed structural titanium parts achieved a gold-standard for the company attaining official approval from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and making the Boeing 787 Dreamliner “the first commercial airplane to fly with certified additive-manufactured titanium parts in structural applications.”

Recently, Norsk Titanium cemented its relationship with Boeing by becoming officially registered on the company’s Qualified Producers List.

The first 3D printed, structurally supportive, titanium part to be used on Boeing 787 Dreamliner reached FAA Approval in February 2017 after year in development. Photo via Norsk Titanium
The first FAA approved, 3D printed, structurally supportive, titanium part to be certified for flight on a Boeing 787 Dreamliner in 2017. Photo via Norsk Titanium

3D printing takes commercial flight

Norsk also plans to integrate RPD additive manufacturing into the production of parts for Spirit’s Boeing 787 fleet, reaffirming the technology’s ability to achieve serialized production.

Through qualification, the companies will validate Spirit’s ongoing process for machining near-net shape additive manufactured parts; verify material conformity; and meet the high standards of finished parts for commercial airlines.

Ron Rabe, Senior Vice President of Fabrication and Supply Chain Management, comments, “Spirit has had a comprehensive and long relationship with Norsk Titanium, and this part will be our first additive structural titanium component incorporated into a commercial airplane program.”

This week, 3D Printing Industry is reporting live from Farnborough International Airshow. For all the latest additive manufacturing news from one of the biggest events in the aerospace calendar, sign up to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

If you are looking for new opportunities in this line of work, join 3D Printing Jobs, employers can also post a job now to make the most of our specialist talent pool.

Featured image shows Norsk Titanium RPD additive manufacturing. Photo via Spirit AeroSystems

FARO 3D scanning acquires Opto-Tech and Open Technologies

Awarding winning 3D scanning and imaging devive provider FARO has announced the acquisition of OptoTech SRL, an Italian optical device machine manufacturer, and its subsidiary Open Technologies SRL, a 3D scanning solutions company.

“Open Technologies proven core competency in compact, 3D structured light scanning solutions aligns perfectly with our strategic direction,” stated Dr. Simon Raab, President and CEO of FARO.

Dental 3D scanning

Founded in 2001 by engineers Matteo Carocci and Alessandro Patrioli, Open Technologies SRL, which is located in Brescia, Italy, has built a portfolio of compact, 3D structured light scanning solutions for dental technicians and orthopedic surgeons to create crowns, implants, and prosthesis.

By leveraging 3D technology, Open Technologies SRL’s industrial 3D scanners and software decrease time and effort across a variety of product design and inspection applications, including reverse engineering, heritage preservation and restoration, product visualization, and dimensional measurement.

Furthermore, Open Technologies SRL has provided solutions for market sectors such as automotive, aerospace, computer graphics, fashion design and public safety.

Scan in a Box, a desktop 3D scanner by Open Technologies SRL. Photo via Open Technologies.
Scan in a Box, a desktop 3D scanner by Open Technologies SRL. Photo via Open Technologies.

Faro’s visionary 3D technology

With over 35 years, FARO has specialized in 3D metrology to aid in the documentation and creation of complex structures, parts, and product designs within areas such as construction and public safety forensics.

Contributing to its product range, FARO previously launched the Quantum ScanArm, a portable 3D scanning solution designed for 3D modeling, reverse engineering, and CAD-based design applications across the product lifecycle management (PLM) process.

The Quantum ScanArm uses optically-superior blue laser technology with fast scanning speed to deliver high-resolution point cloud data. In addition, it is able to scan challenging materials without the need for spray or targets.

Following this, FARO introduced the Freestyle3D Objects Laser Scanner, a colour laser scanning solution tailored for the public safety forensics and product design markets. This product expands the range of FARO Freestyle Scanners, which was initially designed for applications within construction.

“We continue to take a leadership position in the integration of visionary 3D technology as a core solution requirement across the breadth of industries where design or reconstruction is considered critical,” added Raab.

The Freestyle3D Objects Laser Scanner. Photo via FARO.

Stay updated with the latest 3D printing news by subscribing to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a change of pace? Seeking new talent for your business? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows the FARO Focus S 70 Laser Scanner positioned to scan a mechanical room. Photo via FARO.

Arconic announces aggregate region (generic term) deals, Lockheed Martin associated improvement (generic term) understanding

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GE accumulative launches Manufacturing spouse web with Protolabs, woodworker (generic term) and Burloak

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New MyMiniFactory, Dremel and MakeAnything 3D writing (generic term) situation (generic term)

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YouTuber Devin Montes has teamed up with MyMiniFactory and 3D printer maker Dremel for a designing situation (generic term) supported on 3D Puzzles. Devin Montes began 3D writing (generic term) at a immature age, and went on to study Product Design. He runs a Youtube transmission channel MakeAnything on which he walks done his 3D designings and demonstrates the processes … Continue reading “New MyMiniFactory, Dremel and MakeAnything 3D writing (generic term) situation (generic term)”

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