3D Printing Industry review of the year September 2017

September 2017 saw 3D Printing Industry visit the TCT show in
Birmingham, UK. This was an opportunity for hardware, materials
and software manufacturers to make teaser releases ahead of
formnext in November, and it did not disappoint.

In September 3D Printing Industry also visited Taiwan to get
the first look at the
T3D smartphone powered 3D printer
and visit some of the
countries leading additive manufacturing enterprises and
research centers.

New releases from companies not traditionally associated with
the 3D printing industry caught our eye, while our stories
about medical applications caught the eye of our readers.

3D Printing Industry exclusives

In September we visited EOS for an exclusive preview of the EOS
P 500 laser sintering system. 3D
Printing Industry was given an insight into the technology

at the company’s Customer and Technology Center in Krailling,
Germany. The P 500 is capable of producing double the
output of its P 396 predecessor, with a 30% reduction of cost
per part.

According to EOS, the new system was developed with a
reproducible part quality job-to-job and between machines,
automation for Industry 4.0, and material versatility in mind.
The P 500 saw its launch at formnext 2017.

3D printing industry also managed to get an early look at the

Voxeljet’s High Speed Sintering (HSS) VX2000 system
. The
HSS technology uses an infrared reactive ink that is
polymerized by a sweeping print-arm, and it was invented
by Neil Hopkinson at the University of Loughborough in the
early 2000s. The VX2000 notably features
an open-materials platform.

The P 500 is made to complement EOS's existing polymer range of industrial laser sintering 3D printers. Photo by Beau Jackson for 3D Printing IndustryThe P 500 is made to
complement EOS’s existing polymer range of industrial laser
sintering 3D printers. Photo by Beau Jackson for 3D Printing
Industry.

TCT 2017 and beyond

After visiting XYZPrinting’s home country of Taiwan, TCT 2017
at the National Exhibition Centre (NEC) in Birmingham provided
an opportunity to get a second look at the
companies full-color da Vinci 3D printer.

The event also brought 3D printers and 3D
printing systems
, including the Liquid Crystal Maximus 3D
printer. Also on display was the SHR3D IT recycling system
from 3Devo, and samples (although no 3D printer) produced by
the Formlabs Fuse SLS 3D printer.

The Formlabs Fuse marked another trend in the 3D printing
industry, that of more affordable SLS 3D printers. Early movers
in this space are Sinterit, who in September further dropped
the price of
their LISA 3D printer
. In November, the
Natural Robotics VIT desktop SLS 3D printer
would
complete a successful Kickstarter.  The VIT caused much
initial excitement, not least for the promise of 3D printing in
white nylon. At 3D Printing Industry we are looking forward to
seeing samples and of course having the opportunity to test the
machine.

3D Printing Industry also
visited the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) in London
,
for the institute’s first Advanced Materials Showcase since
becoming a public corporation. Here we saw some of the additive
manufacturing and destructive testing that the NPL was
conducting, as part of its effort to boost advanced
manufacturing in the UK.

Across the Atlantic from these events, the
Maker Faire New York  2017
was held at the New York
Hall of Science. The Faire featured 3D food printing
projects such as 3DigitalCooks, fabrication products from
Dremel, and multi-material filaments from FilamentOne.

Stratasys demonstrating 3D printing applications for McClaren at TCT 2017. Photo by Michael Petch for 3D Printing IndustryStratasys demonstrating
3D printing applications for McClaren at TCT 2017. Photo by
Michael Petch for 3D Printing Industry

Under the skin, the readers’ favourite stories

The medical applications of 3D printing made a significant
impression with readers and gave us our most-read stories of
the month. A
3D printed tibia saved the leg of Australian patient Reuben
Lichter
. The 3D printed tibia acted as a scaffold to merge
existing cells from the body, and will eventually allow the
patient to walk again.

From bones to skin,
Harvard researchers used a hybrid 3D printing method combining
direct ink writing (DIW) with automated pick and place (P +P)
of pre-fabricated components
to produce a second electronic
skin. Envisioned as having future use in wearables, the
researchers 3D printed a flexible strain sensor for the
elbow and a foot-sole pressure point reader as a
proof-of-concept.

To provide
general medical assistance in war, Gaza’s Glia Project

continued its work 3D printing stethoscopes and began teaching
doctors how to assemble and use 3D printers for essential
medical supplies.

University of Harvard's Hybrid 3D Printing of Soft Electronics. Photo via the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired EngineeringUniversity of Harvard’s
Hybrid 3D Printing of Soft Electronics. Photo via the Wyss
Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering

3D Printing Industry’s favourites

The city of Chongqing in China decided to
check the prevalence of 3D printers within its boundaries

by ordering the registration of all additive manufacturing
industries. The authorities stated that this action would help
keep dangerous and illegal products from the public.

The
smartphone market took forays into 3D design and VR
in
September, with Sony introducing the the 3D Creator app on
its Xperia XZ1 smartphone, and Apple’s release of the
iPhone X, which features 3D scanning, facial recognition, and
augmented reality (AR). While not yet a serious replacement for
dedicated software, the progress of major enterprises is always
on our radar.

From the palm of the hand to out of this world, 3D printing
also continued produce permanent parts for the aeronautical
industry.
Airbus installed a 3D printed titanium bracket on to its
in-service A350 XWB plane
, and it will form part of
the part of the aircraft pylon, the segment of a plane
attaching jet engines to the wings.

Not be put out of orbit,
NASA announced that they had successfully complete 30 firing
tests on a bi-metallic 3D printed rocket igniter
at
the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.
Essential to the start sequence of a rocket engine, engineers
considered it a technological achievement to 3D print and test
rocket components made with two different alloys.

3D printed titanium bracket assembly. Photo by F. Lancelot/Airbus3D printed titanium
bracket assembly. Photo by F. Lancelot/Airbus

Nominations for the second annual 3D Printing Industry
Awards are now open. 
Make
your selections now.

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Featured image shows the TCT 2017 Logo. Photo by Michael
Petch.

3D Printing Industry Review of the year June 2017

At the beginning of June 2017 Big Four auditor KPMG
published
a report debunking myths about Industry 4.0
and urging
companies to “be bolder” with digital solutions, including
additive manufacturing.

Following on in this theme, this month saw the signing of a
number of high profile partnerships, and the launch of projects
seeking to turn manufacturing on its head.

Aerospace means business

At the 2017 Paris Air Show CFM International, a joint
venture between Safran and GE, received $27
billion worth of orders
for the 3D printing-enabled LEAP
engine. At the same event, GE, Concept Laser and Arcam EBM also
signed an
MOU with Swiss technology group Oerlikon.

The LEAP engine. Image via cCFM AeroenginesThe LEAP engine.
Image via CFM Aeroengines

In the interests of large-scale production for aerospace and
defense Dassault Systèmes and Airbus APWorks also announced a
collaboration, and GKN
Aerospace signed a materials development agreement
with US
research facility Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

This month former President, CEO and Director of 3D Systems

Avi Reichental joined Techniplas LLC
to head up
automotive product development at the company’s new additive
manufacturing center.

Top hardware launches

Formlabs
expanded its tech portfolio
with the selective laser
sintering (SLS) powered Fuse 1 3D printer.

Rize began
commercial shipments of the Rize One
 Augmented Polymer
Deposition (APD) system.


With an investment from the Doka Group,
California’s
Contour Crafting were also looking toward “the first
series-ready deployable robotic 3D construction printer.”

Ski goggles SLS 3D printed on the Fuse 1 and still in the powder bed. Photo via FormlabsSki goggles SLS 3D
printed on the Fuse 1.. Photo via Formlabs

Worth a read

Also published this month: a document of
policy recommendations for additive manufacturing from
CECIMO
, the European Association of Machine Tool
Industries.

And the findings of
a 2 year investigation into the safety of desktop FDM 3D
printers
from Underwriters Laboratories (UL), the
Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University Rollins
School of Public Health.


Nominate the best 3D printing applications of the year now
in the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards.

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Featured image shows detail of a lobster 3D printed on the
Fuse 1. Photo via Formlabs

3D Printing Industry Review of the year July 2017

July 2017 could be thought of as the “month of medicine” on 3D
Printing Industry. Amidst the publication of
Gartner’s 3D printing hype cycle
, and
discussions around net neutrality
, individuals and research
teams around the world put their heads together to develop
cutting edge technology that could improve the quality of
healthcare.

Revolutions in healthcare

The most shared article this month Dani
Clode’s Third Thumb prosthetic experiment
, designed to
“reframe prosthetics as extensions of the body.”

The Third Thumb has superhuman lemon squeezing abilities. Images via Dani Clode.Clode’s Third Thumb
has superhuman lemon squeezing abilities. Image via Dani Clode.

Researchers at ETH Zurich used 3D printing to help create

the world’s first entirely soft artificial heart.

In diagnostics,
breast cancer screening got a boost
from the Stormram
robot.

A new,
tunable 3D printer ink
from Queensland University of
Technology (QUT) claimed to be a precursor to “the next
pharmaceutical revolution.” Also in pharma, scientists proved,
for the first time, that
a type of Pakinson’s medication
could be 3D printed
using  a combination of inkjet and UV curing
methodologies.

A test print of alginate hydrogel ink with a helical design made at QUT. Photo via Forget, Heiny, Derme, MitterbergeA test print of
alginate hydrogel ink with a helical design made at QUT. Photo
via Forget, Heiny, Derme, Mitterberge

And $13.2
million was invested
in a new biomedical facility at the
National University of Singapore Centre for Additive
Manufacturing (AM.NUS).

Beyond medicine

Outside of the lab,
we also went underground
, discovering the part 3D printing
has played in the construction of London’s Forthcoming
Crossrail Elizabeth Line.

At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the U.S. Navy’s
Disruptive Technology Lab unveiled the military’s
first 3D printed submarine hull.
 At 30 feet long, the
hull is still the Navy’s largest 3D printed asset to date,
though with
allocated funding
in the national budget, that may change
in 2018.

U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Rick Perry views the 3D printed proof-of-concept hull for the Optionally Manned Technology Demonstrator (OMTD). (Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of EnergyU.S. Department of
Energy Secretary Rick Perry views the 3D printed proof-of-concept
hull for the Optionally Manned Technology Demonstrator (OMTD).
Photo courtesy of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Department of
Energy

North Dakota State University (NDSU) also took a (literal)
moonshot in
a project developing self-replicating 3D printers for
space.


Nominate the best 3D printing applications of the year now
in the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards.

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Printing Industry newsletter
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Featured image shows the Third Thumb’s many customizable
functions. Image via Dani Clode.

3D Printing Industry Review of the year August 2017

It was earnings season in the 3D printing industry and we
covered the financials of
ExOne
,
SLM Solutions
,
Stratasys
,
Nano Dimension
and
Sigma Labs
. It will be interesting to see how the
projections made halfway through 2017 weigh up to end of year
reports due for release in January.

Small steps, big impact

Perhaps the most popular article in this period was a study
from University of California San Diego and Rady Children’s
Hospital discovering that, on average,
3D printing can help save up to $2,700 per operation.

A co-operative project from the University of Oxford and
University of Bristol developed a new and well-needed
high resolution 3D bioprinting method
operating at
a scale below 200 microns.

In another microscopic 3D printing project, Brigham Young
University (BYU) researchers made
a first-of-its-kind microfluidic chip
with features as
small as 18 μm × 20 μm.

PhD student Hua Gong holds the BYU 3D printed microfluidic device. Photo by Jaren Wilkey/BYU © BYU PHOTO 2017PhD student Hua
Gong holds the BYU 3D printed microfluidic device. Photo by Jaren
Wilkey/BYU
© BYU PHOTO 2017

Music to our ears: More lasers

In
an important step for metal additive manufacturing
,
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) published a
comprehensive study of the spatter effect occurring in metal
particles of powder bed fusion (PBF) 3D printers.

GE Global Research, Senior Additive Technology Platform
Leader Waseem Faidi advocated a strategy for development of

faster metal 3D printers.

And to overcome the challenges of 3D printing copper, the
Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology (ILT) launched
the
“SLM in Green” project,
replacing typically red SLM lasers
with a viridescent equivalent.

Preview of Fraunhofer's SLM in Green copper printing project. Photo by Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.Preview of
Fraunhofer’s SLM in Green copper printing project. Photo by
Fraunhofer ILT, Aachen, Germany.


Nominate the best of 2017 now in the 2018 3D Printing
Industry Awards.

Don’t miss out on another story – subscribe to the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
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on Twitter
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Featured image shows dvanced imaging of melt pool metrology
in metal powder bed fusion has been captured at
LLNL. Photo via Lawrence Livermore National
Laboratory.

3D Printing Industry Review of the year April 2017

April Fools! One of the most popular articles this month was

Formlabs’ prank launch of Form 2 Breakfast Extensions
.
However, in the days that followed, the 3D printing industry
saw many innovation that would continue to be referenced
throughout the year.

Exclusive insights

This month the 2017 Wholers Report, an annual worldwide
progress document of the state of additive manufacturing, was
published, and 3D Printing Industry attained
exclusive insight from the document’s principal author Terry
Wholers.

Markforged co-founder and CEO Greg Mark claimed that
the future of metal 3D printing is in print farms
, and
an interview
with MIT professors Wojciech Matusik and Justin
Solomon
 addressing the additive engineering skills
shortage went on to be the top most shared article for the
month.

“The future is so metal” gif featuring the Metal X 3D
printed. Clip via Markforged on YouTube

Big sculptures, big movements, Big Data

The Salone del Mobile Milan Design Week from April 4-9 featured

innovative 3D printed sculptures
from teams at Zaha
Hadid Architects and Neri Oxman’s Mediated Matter lab at MIT.
We attended
the opening of Shining3D’s Europe, Middle East and
Africa (EMEA) Office
in Stuttgart, Germany. And, at the
UK’s national Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), I shared
insights on the
relationship between additive manufacturing and Big Data
as
delivered by Dassault Systèmes and other speakers of
the UK Intelligent Engineering Forum (UKIEF).

"Thallus" by Zaha Hadid Architects. Exhibited at the Pinacoteca di Brera gallery in Milan. Photo by Luke Hayes“Thallus” by Zaha
Hadid Architects. Exhibited at the Pinacoteca di Brera gallery in
Milan. Photo by Luke Hayes

We have liftoff

3D printing in aerospace received a particularly large boost in
April 2017. Stratasys entered into
a strategic partnership with SIA Engineering Company
Limited.

Aerojet Rocketdyne successfully
tested
its 3D printed thrust chamber. Made in Space
celebrated
an outstanding year aboard the ISS.

Tooling around on the International Space Station. A 3D printed KOBALT wrench made by the Additive Manufacturing Facility. Photo via Made in Space/NASATooling around on
the International Space Station. A 3D printed KOBALT wrench made
by the Additive Manufacturing Facility. Photo via Made in
Space/NASA

And, making a potential contender for
3D printing application of the year
, Norsk Titanium made
the Boeing 787 Dreamliner the “first
commercial airplane
to fly with certified
additive-manufactured titanium parts in structural
applications.”

Though not an exclusively aerospace-focused
project NextGen
AM was also launched this month
, a product of collaboration
between Premium AEROTEC, EOS and Daimler. It will be
interesting to see the first outcomes of this project in 2018.

Don’t miss out in 2018 – subscribe to the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
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on Twitter
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Don’t forget to nominate companies in the the second annual 3D
Printing Industry Awards
.

Featured image shows a bed of additively manufactured
titanium components for the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. Photo via
Norsk Titanium

UK 3D printing start-ups to watch in 2018

This is a guest article from Ed Tyson, founder of
rigid.ink

rigid.ink is a world-class filament company based in
the UK, renowned for reliable FDM printer filament. When not
getting in the way at rigid.ink HQ, Ed writes technical how-to
guides that are published on the
rigid.ink
website.

UK 3D printing start-ups to watch in 2018

Here in the UK, there’s a solid community of 3D printing
evangelists, but our rather modest developments have nearly
always been overshadowed by larger US companies and we’re
second in Europe to Germany. Rightly so, as the US and Germany
have been making some inspiring advancements in recent
years.

But now, things are changing. Let me explain.

The mass-media overhypes many new technologies, and 3D
printing was no exception. Audacious promises were made for bio
printed replacement organs, and custom, print-at-home shoes. In
reality, early 3D printers were expensive, hard-to-use and
often took a long time to make even small objects.

Quick and nimble startups are making headway, taking what
is possible with 3D printing and finding real applications for
it. These 3D printing start-up are also launching to market in
record time.

I wanted to highlight some of the special, new businesses
that are doing something a little different. My business in 3D
printing is less than 3 years old, and in that time I’ve had
the fortune of meeting many businesses in the space, innovating
in extraordinary ways. Innovating in

real ways.

This article covers the UK’s hottest new businesses
you’ll want to pay close attention to in 2018.

Additive Manufacturing Technologies

Based in Sheffield, AMT has a
patented post-processing method for polymer 3D prints.

AMT’s PUSh™ method was developed at the University of
Sheffield and commercialized by AMT. It produces a smooth
surface finish on 3D prints made using HP’s MJF, SLS or FFF
methods.

Automatically finishing a 3D printed part so that doesn’t
look 3D printed is a milestone in the development to moving
closer to end use parts straight from the 3D printer. During
2017,

AMT raised £625,000 in funding
, so it’ll
be interesting to see how they develop next year.
  

Prodpoint

Sometimes you need to produce a prototype or a one-off
end-use part in the space of a few days, as opposed to a few
months with more traditional methods. This is where 3D printing
excels.

But what if you need to produce a batch run of those
parts where getting an injection mould designed and produced
would be too expensive for a relatively short run?

The team at Prodpoint
have created a 3D printing ‘farm’ of 24 heated chamber
printers, to allow batch production volumes in extremely short
time windows. Like a ‘regular’ 3D printing bureau, except 24 x
the output.  

The Prodpoint 3D printing farm.The Prodpoint 3D
printing farm.

Fluxaxis

Based on an old military airfield in Yorkshire, Fluxaxis
is a
relatively
new bureau
. They’re an off-shoot from
Stageone, who built some of the set for the London 2012
Olympics.

And they’re packing some serious kit including a HP
Multi-Jet Fusion 4200, a lesser-spotted Massivit 1800, and an
extremely accurate Steinbichler Comet L3D scanner, among other
tech.

They even have a huge Poseidon 5 Axis CNC machine, which
are usually found in F1 and Aerospace workshops.  

They’re now one of the most cutting edge bureaus in the
UK, with specialist 3D printers capable of producing virtually
anything that’s possible to make with a 3D printer.

Fluxaxis Lions being machined.Fluxaxis Lions being
machined.

Andiamo

A hugely commendable cause, Andiamo deliver “medically
effective orthosis without 2 weeks of a person’s need,
globally.” Their aim is to dramatically bring down the waiting
time and cost of orthotic supports.

With the lightweight braces they’re producing, they’re
steadily
transforming
UK paediatrics
and making huge differences to
people who need them.

Helping people walk with
3D printing
from Naveed R. Parvez on
Vimeo.

FabRx

FabRx wants to make
bespoke 3D printed pharmaceuticals
. The
London based enterprise believes children will prefer a fun
star shaped gummy that is far more appetising than regular
pills or sour tasting medicine.

This is the dream FabRx are
working towards with their adapted 3D printers, in the tightly
regulated pharmaceutical market it remains to be seen if this
is product for the wider market.

FabRX won the 2017 TCT Startup Award. Photo by Michael Petch.FabRX won the 2017 TCT
Startup Award. Photo by Michael Petch.

Open Bionics

Based in Bristol, this team is making headway for two
reasons. One, they’re creating incredibly functional and
tactile electronic prosthetic arms and hands. Two, they make
them look cool while they’re doing it.

In 2017, Open Bionics
won the $1 million UAE Robotics for Good
Awards in Dubai
. The enterprise is expanding
and are well set to positioning themselves are the industry
leaders in prosthetics.

Recently a
video
went viral featuring an amputee
musician, who could now play the piano with his new digital
prosthetic thanks to Open Bionics.

More information
about Open Bionics is available here
.

The Open Bionics team
with their million dollar cheque. Photo via Open Bionics.

3D Printing in 2018

It’ll be exciting to see what the future bears for these
fresh and developing businesses. They’re reaping the benefits
of rapid prototyping now while large manufactures are still
wondering how to implement the technology to their
benefit.

I didn’t want to include rigid.ink in this list – you
can’t call me biased; we’ve got some exciting things planned
for 2018 and I’m feeling even more inspired after compiling the
examples above. Our business maybe reliable filament, but we
pride ourselves on the quality help-guides and service we offer
freely.

Hopefully one day we can inspire others, too.
 

We want to know how 3D printing is developing in your
region.
Contact
us
, if you want to share your
perspective with the largest audience in 3D
printing.

Which 3D printing start-up should be recognized at the
2018 3D Printing Industry Awards?

Make your nominations
now
.

For all the latest 3D printing news,
subscribe
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newsletter
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and
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.

3D Printing Industry Review of the year May 2017

A month of celebration – in May we held the
first ever annual 3D Printing Industry Awards
and hosted

a gala dinner of esteemed guests
including Siemens, 3D
Systems, Ultimaker, Zortrax, Desktop Metal, Shining 3D,
Markforged, Zortrax, Sinterit, HP, Dassault Systèmes, DWS,
Autodesk, Polymaker and UCL.

3D Printing Industry EIC Michael Petch stands beside Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President and General Manager of GE Additive, holding the winning 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy for Financier of the Year 2017. Photo by Beau Jackson3D Printing
Industry EIC Michael Petch stands beside Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice
President and General Manager of GE Additive, holding the winning
3D Printing Industry Awards trophy for Financier of the Year
2017. Photo by Beau Jackson

Morgan
Morey
 was also announced as the winner of the 3D
Printing Industry Awards competition for his
“Additive Man” trophy design
incorporating a model from the
Scan the World collection with low poly elements.

You can now get
involved in the 2018 awards
by nominating potential winners
here.

High-risk high-gain

May was also a big month for additive manufacturing in defence.
The U.S. Department of Defense Office of Economic Adjustment
Funds awarded a research consortium $1.5
million for the development of appropriate certification
and qualification procedures
for 3D printed metal parts.

A build plate of of 3D printed metal bottle openers made at ADAPT as a sample. Photo via ADAPTCenter on FacebookA build plate of of
3D printed metal bottle openers made at ADAPT as a sample. Photo
via ADAPTCenter on Facebook

The European Defence Agency commenced a project to asses

the value of 3D printing in military operations
at a new
European Tactical Airlift Centre (ETAC) in Zaragoza, Spain.

Boeing and Aerojet Rocketdyne were signed up to complete design
work of the
DARPA hypersonic spaceplane aircraft.

And a team at the New York University Tandon School of
Engineering, published
a paper of interest to high-risk
manufacturing
 describing a method on adding deliberate
mistakes to .stl files as a means of security.

Popular developments

In innovative applications, Local Motors
3D printed the first autonomous Olli bus
. And Damen
Shipyards announced development of
the metal 3D printed WAAMpeller.

Then, in stories that took the industry by storm, 18 year old
Rifath Sharook designed
the “world’s lightest satellite,”
and Northwestern
University showcased the ability to 3D print
functioning mouse ovaries.

Scientist holding a 3D printed mouse ovary cell scaffold. Photo via Northwestern University.Scientist holding a
3D printed mouse ovary cell scaffold. Photo via Northwestern
University.


Nominate the best 3D printing applications of the year now
in the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards.

Don’t miss out on another story – subscribe to the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
follow us
on Twitter
, and like us
on Facebook.

Featured image shows a view of guests as they arrive
in Chelsea Old Town Hall for the first annual 3D Printing
Industry Awards, photo by Antoine Fargette for 3D Printing
Industry.

3D Printing Industry Review of the year February 2017

Our 3D Printing Industry review of the year
looks at most interesting and noteworthy stories that we
covered throughout February 2017. The month marked an important
change in strategy for a major company and also saw new 3D
printers, software and material releases. Investment in 3D
printing was also an important activity, with the completion of
a key deal. 

New 3D printers from Stratasys, Research from
University of Texas and MIT

February saw
the launch of Stratasys F123 series of FDM 3D
printers
, which the company directed at workgroups
tackling product design and development. The materials offered
across the full F123 range include ASA, ABS and PC-ABS. And
most significantly, the entry price came down to below $20,000.
This trend would be continued in 2017 as well-established
market leaders like Stratasys changed strategy in reaction to
an increasing number of professional grade 3D printers that
threatening to nibble at market share. 

While larger companies still hold much of the IP necessary to
work with higher grade thermoplastics, increasingly younger
enterprises were finding ingenious ways to build 3D printers
with the same capabilities – but at a lower price. Later in the
year, we’ll see how a second string to this strategy of
maintaining and expanding market share via re-seller channels
will come into play.

New research at the
University of Texas, Austin looked at “Splat Morphology”
,
or how liquid particles behave when hitting a surface. The
study, by Vimal Ramanuj and Albert Y. Tong numerically express
splat behavior. and how it may be used to advance metal 3D
printing techniques.

Analysing the continuity, momentum and energy
of Tin-Antimony alloy droplets undergoing the splat process,
the researchers concluded that the morphology was chiefly
affected by impact velocity and droplet temperature.

Researchers at MIT announced that they had
created
a 3D printable robotic hydrogel device capable
of catching and releasing live fish
. The device
functions in a similar manner to a claw crane. Water is pumped
into the hollow, 3D printed arms which rapidly expand, stretch
out, and then contract at several Newtons per second.

Since the arms are soft, aqueous and
transparent, no harm is done to the fish, The researchers are
currently looking into using them for interfaces with delicate
human organs and tissue.

The hydrogel gripper
catching a goldfish. Photo via Hyunwoo Yuk.

Negative news for TIKO, MakerBot and Autodesk… 

A disappointing hangover from 2015, the team behind the TIKO 3D
printer further confirmed that the writing was on the wall with
a Kickstarter update on it’s “Highs and Lows”. In this update,

TIKO shared some “regretful news”
,
cancelling pre-orders and winding down operations, effectively
placing the company on standby.

The company vowed to “speak to investors,” but
at the same time refused to refund both investments and the
separate shipping cost. It would take until November for the
lights to fully
burn out on the TIKO project
.

3D printer manufacturer
MakerBot found itself on shaky
ground
following an announcement that staff numbers
would be slashed by 30%. Our interview with Josh Snider, the
company’s newly appointed PR manager, confirmed this figure but
dispelled rumors of a collapse. Snider also promised some
“breakthrough” products for 2017.

Carl Bass announced his
resignation as CEO of Autodesk
,
following a series of losses and increased control by hedge
funds. Bass remained a member of the company’s board of
directors. 

Carl Bass in his workshop at Autodesk. Photo via: Autodesk blogsCarl Bass in his
workshop at Autodesk. Photo via Autodesk blogs

…Positivity for Group Gorge and Desktop Metal

Group Gorge, the parent company of 3D printer
manufacturer Prodways, used its
2016 financial results statement
to
concurrently announce the development of “new proprietary 3D
printing technology”. The $281.2 million top-line revenues were
an increase of 6% on the previous year.

Desktop Metal, a Massachusetts-based 3D
printing startup announced that it had raised $45 million in
funding,
bringing up total funds to over $97 million
since its founding in October 2015
. This round of
funding was expected to accelerate the company’s move towards
releasing a 3D printer later in 2017.

Novel applications and new locations

The office of the Mayor of London announced
plans for
the largest 3D printing center in the
UK
. The new facility would form part of the
regeneration of the Silvertown district of the London
Docklands, centered around the redevelopment of the derelict
Millennium Mills flour factory.

Swiss advanced manufacturing company
Oerlikon also announced plans
to
construct a build a new 3D printing facility in Charlotte,
North Carolina. The company stated that its new site would be
functional by 2018. Later in the year 3D Printing Industry
editor-in-chief attended the opening of Oerlikon’s R&D
center outside Munich and saw how Oerlikon is set to become a
serious contender in additive manufacturing.

3D printing found a life-changing use in

facial reconstruction surgery for 32-year-old
Andy Sandness
. To carry out a full facial transplant
on Sandness, surgeons from the Mayo Clinic used 3D printed
models produced by 3D Systems as a pre-surgical guide.

Ahead of the Formula One season in March,

Ferrari announced that it was developing
pistons for its new engine using 3D printing
technology
. Together with Italian engineering
company Magneti Marelli, Ferrari us creating a new stronger
piston made from steel alloy with complex geometries for
topology optimization.

Throughout 2017, the F1 industry began to relax its stance on
NDAs. This was a welcome development and allowed many of the 3D
Printing Industry to finally boast about exciting applications
of their technology.

EOS F1 brake pedals at
formnext. Photo by Michael Petch.

3D Printing Industry at the scene

3D Printing Industry had the opportunity to
interview a number of pioneers in the field, and hear their
insights first-hand.
Prof. Jennifer Lewis from Harvard
University
explained current research in
bioengineering and bioprinting cell inks, while
Michigan Tech professor Joshua
Pearce
explained how his research suggested that 3D
printing would be suitable for everyday mass markets.

3D Printing Industry also had the chance to
meet Leo
Christodoulou, a director at Boeing
, who revealed
that 50,000 additively manufactured parts were currently flying
on Boeing Aircraft, explained the precise advantages 3D
printing had over other technologies and gave his predictions
for the future.

Finally, 3D Printing Industry travelled with
Scan the World to the private collection
of Christian Levett in the South of France,
to observe how statues from as far back as
Ancient Rome could be 3D scanned and digitally
preserved
.

art collector Christian Levett trying out an EinscanPro 3D scanner on the the antique head of Roman Woman in his personal collection. Photo by Jonathan Beck of Scan the Worldart collector Christian
Levett trying out an EinscanPro 3D scanner on the the antique
head of Roman Woman in his personal collection. Photo by Jonathan
Beck of Scan the World.

Nominations for the second annual 3D Printing Industry
Awards are now open. 
Make
your selections now.

For more annual roundups, subscribe to our
free 3D Printing Industry newsletter
,
follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Featured image shows a 3D printer from Stratasys’ F123
Series. Photo via Stratasys.

3D Printing Industry Review of the year March 2017

As 2017 marched on, policy guidelines
started to roll in to help encourage adption of 3D printing
throughout existing industry. This month we also announced
that Dr Adrian Bowyer, inventor of RepRap project, would
be receiving our award for
Outstanding Contribution to 3D Printing
, and covered a
number of events across Europe.

Mapping out the future of additive

Keen to start as they mean to go on, the UK
Department for Culture, Media & Sport released its
forward-facing Digital Strategy
, hoping to bring
more Makerspaces and FabLabs to the nation through the
introduction of regional Tech Hubs.

3D printing technology innovator America Makes also published

its roadmap for the future of additive manufacturing
in the
U.S., and Ralph Resnick, President and Executive Director,
National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining (NCDMM)
and Founding Director of America Makes, wrote
a guest post for the site
about the cyber security
risk in manufacturing.

A first time for everything

In an industry full of firsts, March was no exception. In this
month,
SpaceX set a date for the maiden voyage
of its Crew
Dragon spacecraft. The U.S.
Navy 3D printed its first aircraft component
for use inside
a T-44 Pegasus airplane.

A test flight of the Crew Dragon to try the abort system. Photo via SpaceXA test flight of
the Crew Dragon to try the abort system. Photo via SpaceX

Deakin University researchers successfully
3D printing a superstrength Boron Nitride Nanotube
(BNNT)/Titanium composite
. And Cazza Technologies announced

construction plans for a 3D printed skyscraper in Dubai.

Our popular Future of 3D Printing (the next five years) series
also
kicked off with an article from Rize
, followed by
subsequent contributions from Michigan Technological
University’s Professor
Joshua Pearce
Amy
Davey of Renishaw and the NHS
; Naomi Wu aka
Sexy Cyborg;
 and Simon Fried, the
Co-Founder and Chief Business Officer of Nano Dimension.

Michigan Tech students celebrate a massive delta-style 3D printer build as part of a class on Open Source 3D Printing. Professor Joshua Pearce seen center. Photo by S. Bird/MTU, CCBYSAMichigan Tech
students celebrate a massive delta-style 3D printer build as part
of a class on Open Source 3D Printing. Professor Joshua Pearce
seen center. Photo by S. Bird/MTU, CCBYSA

Around the world 

Having travelled to more than 14 locations all around the world
this year, the 3D Printing Industry team found ourselves in
France and the Netherlands in March.


On the road with Jonathan Beck,
founder of digital heritage
project Scan the World, I interviewed Leisa Paoli, director of
the Mougins
Museum of Classical Art
 in the south of France, about
creative curation and the digitalization of art.

Meanwhile in Eindhoven, Corey attended
the Additive World ‘Industrial 3D printing’
conference
 to get a live
demonstration of the MetalFAB1 machine from Additive
Industries.

The Venus cabinet in the Mougins Museum of Classical Art featuring works by Andy Warhol, Yves Klein, Salvador Dali and Cézanne. Photo by Jonathan BeckThe Venus cabinet
in the Mougins Museum of Classical Art featuring works by Andy
Warhol, Yves Klein, Salvador Dali and Cézanne. Photo by Jonathan
Beck


Don’t forget to nominate for the best stories of the year
in 
the
second annual 3D Printing

Industry Awards now.

Never miss a story again – subscribe to the
free 3D Printing Industry newsletter
follow us
on Twitter
, and like us
on Facebook.

Featured image shows Dr. Adrian Bowyer. Photo via
Phaidon

The 3D Printing Industry review of the year – January 2017

In 2017, 3D Printing Industry celebrated 5 years of
reporting on additive manufacturing and 3D printing news about
the enterprises, research and applications that make this
technology so interesting.

Our team of reporters have travelled the globe, and saw
first hand how additive manufacturing is transforming the
world. Whether speaking at academic conferences, attending the
largest 3D printing event in history, and even riding a
speedboat to one event – we are determined to provide our
readers with all news and insight about

Our perspective comes from a passion for 3D printing. The
articles you read are written by journalists immersed in 3D
printing, with the hum of 3D printers our soundtrack to
writing.

We’ve taken a different approach to news. We like to see
things first hand, read the academic papers, and print the
first layer – rather than republish PR. It seems to be strategy
that is working.

Of course takes time and commitment. As editor-in-chief,
I am very proud of the reporters here in our office. And many
of you will have met
Beau, Rushahb and
our other reporters at events throughout the year.

As I hear frequently from readers – if it’s not on 3DPI,
then it’s not news.

With that is mind, here is the 3D Printing Industry
review of the year for January 2017.

In January we visited
Maastricht for the 3D Medical Expo
.
Regenerative Polymers and High Resolution Biomaterial Printing
were on the agenda, alongside over advanced uses of AM for
medical applications.

Large format metal 3D printing advanced during 2017, with
Sciaky using there additive manufacturing systems to


create components for the Arctic Explorer
AUV
.

Tracking data and statistics for the 3D printing industry
was the focus of a number of enterprises. At the start of the
year

MyMiniFactory began to release information

on how their users were working with 3D printing.

3D Printing at CES

Also in the consumer sector, CES saw companies including
Italy’s DWS bring

3D printers to a wider audience
.

Founded, 50 years ago CES now features a dedicated 3D
printing area.
Rich Stump, FATHOM
Co-Founder and Principal,
took a detailed look at the electronics show

and the 3D printing buzz at the 2017 event.

Nano Dimension and FATHOM at CES 2017. Photo via @studiofathom on Twitter.Nano Dimension and the 3D
printed FATHOM circuitboard at CES 2017. Photo via @studiofathom
on Twitter.

Markforged were at the center of this buzz. Choosing CES
to announce their

Metal X 3D printer
.

A recurring theme during 2017 was how 3D printing, and
particularly with lower cost 3D printers, was enabling
scientific research. At Cranfield University we saw how


microfluidics research enabled by 3D printing

was progressing and in Madrid, a
3D bioprinter for skin was
announced
.

In the textile industry, the
potential for a sustainable industry was
explored
.

Investment in the 3D Printing Industry

Investment and acquisitions continued throughout 2017 in
a robust manner. January saw

3D Systems acquire Nextdent
and the
range of dental 3D printing materials.

Voodoo Manufacturing raised $1.5 M
,
taking the company to a $10 M valuation.

Also during January a collaboration between

Audi and EOS was announced
.
equipment and prototype building at Audi, as
well as motor sports, where the technology is already in use
today
.” We also reported on
the use of 3D printing at Ford
.

EOS Customer & Technology Center in Krailling, Germany. Photo by Beau Jackson for 3D Printing IndustryEOS Customer &
Technology Center in Krailling, Germany. Photo by Beau Jackson
for 3D Printing Industry

Partnerships in the 3D printing industry were a regular
feature of 2017. Siemens in particular continued to explore
opportunities via deals with

Trumpf
and
Materialise
during January.

We also reported how 3D printing had become an

important part of plans to reinvigorate
regions
. We visited
several of the companies in the North of the
UK
to learn more about how additive
manufacturing is growing,

At the other end of the scale, Kickstarter continued to
see an increasing number of 3D printing campaigns launched.
While the majority of these were genuine, not all were so.
After concerns were raised by backers,

3D Printing Industry investigated further,

visiting the planned demonstration by Next
Dynamics of their NexD1. The project was later suspended by
Kickstarter.

3D printing takes off in 2017

Advanced uses of 3D printing included the progression of
the

GE9X engine
, that underwent further
testing in 2017. GE also gave more details about their


plans for the industrialization of additive
manufacturing
, and as the year progressed we
got to see first hand how this was taking shape.

The secretive world of F1 started to open up about
the

use of 3D printing to gain an edge
. And
while 3D printing for the highest level of motorsport has a
long history, it was encouraging for the industry as a whole to
see enterprises move beyond NDAs.

In other transportation news
self driving vehicles from Local Motors

 and a
venture from Michelin
harnessed additive
manufacturing.

The Functional Lattices for Automotive Components (FLAC)
at the University of Nottingham began work on a project
to

reduce weight in automotive components by
40-80%
.

Reaching beyond the terrestrial arena, we spoke to Justin
Kugler, business development engineer at Jacksonville Florida’s
Made in Space about

plans for the future of additive manufacturing in
space
.

Testing the Made In Space 3D printer inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) Engineering Unit at Marshall Space Flight Center. Photo by NASATesting the Made In
Space 3D printer inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG)
Engineering Unit at Marshall Space Flight Center. Photo by NASA

Powering off-world exploration,
Rocket Crafters were granted a patent on 3D printed
rocket fuel
. Also in January, we reported on
how

Boeing’s Starliner spacecraft
, intended
to transport up to 7 crew members to Low Earth Orbit (LEO)
destinations, would enabled by Oxford Performance
Materials.

Even
more humble modes of transport
were not
immune from 3D printing.

Medical applications of 3D printing continued to amaze
with

landmark surgeries
aided by

3D printing
becoming an increasingly
regular feature on our pages.

The McDonald twins take
their first look at each other. Photo via Christine Pogliano
Gresso/Facebook.


3D printed bionic hands
and
remarkable
prosthetics were regular features on 3D
Printing Industry.
Other fantastic projects
included

fighting crime with 3D

technology.

3D printing proved a useful tool to encourage

visionary thinking
. With even

Mark Zuckerberg
using 3D printing to
promote VR and
Oculus Medium.

And finally, at the beginning of 2017 we made our
own

predictions for 3D printing in
2017
. Did we get it right?
Subscribe
to our free 3D Printing Industry
newsletter
, follow us on
Twitter,
and
like us on
Facebook
to read the rest of our review
of the year.

You can nominate the enterprises and applications
leading the 3D printing industry. Tell us who should feature in
the

2018 3D Printing Industry Awards
now
.