Raise3D Pro2 Series 3D printers technical specifications and pricing

Raise3D
continues to advance their vision for the future of 3D
printing with the launch of the Pro2 series 3D printers.

Raise3D CEO Diogo Quental said, “Even if our N2 printers
have been considered among the best for desktop fabrication by
Make Magazine and 3D Hubs Community, there was still room for
improvement in some features. We carried out a full revision of
our N2 series and designed a new printer with the best
performance and quality components we could develop or find in
the market.”

The Raise N2 FFF 3D Printer was shortlisted for a

2017 3D Printing Industry Award
. Our
readers have again nominated the popular 3D printer from
Raise3D in this year’s Awards.

You can make own your vote here
.

While the Pro2 Series printers may appear very similar to
the N2 Series, Raise3D says “the two lines of printers are
essentially different.”

The Raise3D Pro2 Plus 3D printer. Photo via Raise3D.The Raise3D Pro2 Plus 3D
printer. Photo via Raise3D.

Pro2 and Pro2 Plus technical specifications and pricing

The Pro2 is available at a pre-sale price of $3,999.00.
The 3D printer has a dual extruder and features electronic
driven lifting, Raise3D says this gives 4× increased torque
performance. A layer height of 0.01mm is possible and the 300ºC
printing ability means a wide range of filaments are
compatible. Filament options include PLA. ABS, PP, HIPS, PETG
and more. Control and display is via a 7″ Touch Screen with
wireless capability. It is also possible to resume 3D printing
after a power outage.

Raise3D Pro2 3D printer series. Photo via Raise 3D.Raise3D Pro2 3D printer
series. Photo via Raise 3D.

The build volume of the Raise3D Pro2 depends upon whether
a dual or single extruder is used. In single mode the volume is
305x305x300mm (12x12x11.8 inch). For dual, 280x305x300mm
(11x12x11.8 inch) is the build volume.

The Pro2 Plus series is available for a pre-sale price of
$5,999.00. The specifications above are expanded to include a
filament sensor, camera and filter. However it is the increased
build volume that will draw many to the Pro2 Plus. Operating
with a single extruder a build volume of 305x305x605mm
(12x12x23.8 inch) is available. In dual extrusion mode the
build volume is 280x305x605mm (11x12x23.8 inch).

Dual Extruder on the Raise3D Pro2 3D printer series. Photo via Raise3D.Dual Extruder on the
Raise3D Pro2 3D printer series. Photo via Raise3D.

The pathway to flexible manufacturing

The Pro2 Series 3D printer range marks a new phase in the
development of Raise3D. Accompanying today’s launch is the an
update on the company’s vision to pathfind flexible
manufacturing.

Raise3D Chairman, Edward Feng, shares his vision for
flexible manufacturing and low-volume manufacturing in the
video below.

Flexible manufacturing is an extension of the growing
number of desktop FDM 3D printing factories. Raise3D believes
that such systems are advantageous due to their relatively
affordability, citing a capital cost starting at $50,000. A
flexible manufacturing system will be useful for batches
reaching several thousand 3D prints, they also, “easy to learn,
easy to maintain, easy to upgrade and easy to scale-up.”

As highlighted by the 3D Printing Industry series,

trends in additive manufacturing for
production
, 3D printing is increasingly
finding application for such purposes.

In an earlier interview with Quental, the Raise3D CEO
elaborates further on his

strategy for industrial 3D printing
and
the roadmap to 2020.

Camera on the Raise3D Pro2 3D printer series. Photo via Raise 3D.Camera on the Raise3D
Pro2 3D printer series. Photo via Raise 3D.

At 3D Printing Industry, we look forward to experiencing
the new Raise3D line of 3D printers for ourselves. Those
attending RAPID next month will also have the opportunity to
see the 3D printers first hand.

Keep up to date with the latest developments in 3D
printing. Subscribe to the
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Industry newsletter
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Twitter
and like us on Facebook.

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healthcare application of the year in the

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Awards
.

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Jobs
service is now live. Post a job or
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is sponsoring the
2018

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competition.
Enter now for the chance to
win a 3D printer.

Featured image shows the The Raise3D Pro2 3D printer.
Photo via Raise3D.

Carnegie Mellon University researchers publish designs for open-source 3D bioprinter

Researchers at Carnegie
Mellon University
have developed an open-source, low-cost
3D bioprinter. They have published a paper in

HardwareX
with the complete instructions
for the installation of a syringe-based large volume extruder
(LVE) on a desktop FDM 3D printer.

The LVE allows users to print artificial human tissues at
a high resolution and scale. It is designed to print a range of
materials, including biopolymers, hydrogels, pastes and
epoxies.

Adam Feinberg, one of the authors of the paper and a
Biomedical Engineering Associate Professor at Carnegie Mellon,
said “The LVE 3D bioprinter allows us to print much larger
tissue scaffolds, at the scale of an entire human heart, with
high quality.”

PrintrBot Simple Metal modified with the LVE. Image via Kira Pusch, Thomas J.Hinton, Adam W.Feinberg.PrintrBot Simple Metal
modified with the LVE. Image via Kira Pusch, Thomas J.Hinton,
Adam Feinberg.

Democratising technology, making 3D bioprinting more
accessible

Feinberg says that the LVE can be installed for less than
$500. The modifications were applied to a

PrintrBot Simple 3D printer
, though the
authors say the LVE should be compatible with many desktop FDM
3D printers.

Most commercial 3D bioprinters cost between
$10,000-200,000. The cheapest 3D bioprinter on the market is
the

Allevi 1
, at $4,995. Feinberg claims
that the LVE is “at least on par with many [3D bioprinters]
that cost far more money”, though he did not name any specific
3D bioprinters for comparison.

Theoretically compatible with any open-source FDM 3D
printer

Kira Pusch, a recent graduate from Materials Science and
Engineering at Carnegie Mellon said that “What we’ve created is
a large volume syringe pump extruder that works with almost any
open source fused deposition modelling (FDM) printer. This
means that it’s an inexpensive and relatively easy adaptation
for people who use 3D printers.”

Feinberg’s lab at Carnegie Mellon is aiming to produce
more open-source biomedical research, to accelerate the speed
of biomedical innovation. “It’s really about democratising the
technology and trying to get it into more people’s hands” said
Feinberg.

We envision this as being the first of many
technologies that we push into the open source environment to
drive the field forward. It’s something we really believe
in.

Open-source 3D models of all the 3D printed components required for the LVE. Image viaOpen-source 3D models
of all the 3D printed components required for the LVE. Image
via Kira Pusch, Thomas J.Hinton, Adam Feinberg.

Researchers at the University of Manchester are
making
human cell models using 3D bioprinting
in hopes of finding
the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Oxford, UK, based 3D
bioprinting company OxSyBio has raised
$14 million in series A financing
, with the long term goal
of having 3D bioprinters produce tissue transplants.

A paper titled “Large volume syringe pump extruder for desktop
3D printers” with further details about the 3D bioprinter
featured in the article is published online in the HardwareX
journal. It is co-authored by Kira Pusch, Thomas J.Hinton
and Adam Feinberg.

Keep up to date with the latest 3D printing related
research. Subscribe to the 
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3D Printing Industry Awards
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 is sponsoring the 2018 3D
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 Enter now for the chance to win a
Wanhao Duplicator 9 3D printer. Closes on midnight March
31st. 

Featured image shows the open-source 3D models of all the
3D printed components required for the LVE. Image via Kira
Pusch, Thomas J.Hinton, Adam Feinberg.

Arup and CLS Architetti 3D printing concrete house for Milan Design Week

Architecture firms
Arup,
 UK, and CLS
Architetti
, Italy, are 3D printing a concrete
house as part of their
3D Housing 05
project, for this year’s Milan Design
Week
.

Designed to be disassembled and moved, the house will be
3D printed over the course of a week, on site at Milan’s Piazza
Cesare Beccaria. It will feature a living area, bedroom,
kitchen and bathroom over an area of 100 square meters. The
architects intend the house to be a demonstration of the
maturity of concrete 3D printing for architectural
applications.

CyBe robot 3D printing arm constructing a concrete wall. Photo via CLS Architetti.CyBe robot 3D printing
arm constructing a concrete wall. Photo via CLS Architetti.

Collaborating to advance sustainable concrete 3D
printing

A
robot 3D printing arm
supplied by Dutch
company
CyBe
Construction
is producing the house’s walls,
roof, window frames and doors. Cement is supplied by
Italy’s
Italcementi,
a subsidiary of

HeidelbergCement
, both companies form
the world’s second largest supplier of cement.

Last year, CyBe used their
CyBe RC 3D printing arm to construct a 168 meter squared
research facility
for the Dubai Electricity and Water
Authority
.

Arup’s Europe Materials Consulting Lead, Guglielmo Carra,
said “the construction industry is one of the world’s biggest
users of resources and emitters of CO2. We want to bring a
paradigm shift in the way the construction industry operates
and believe that 3D printing technology is critical to making
buildings more sustainable and efficient.”

Arup claims this method of 3D printing wastes fewer
materials and benefits from the ability to produce complex
structures like double curved walls. Using only the materials
required (as the 3D file specifies the exact volume of material
needed) will result in  a lower cost – if everything goes
to plan.

3D printing the walls of the 3D printed house. Photo viaCyBe 3D printing arm
constructing concrete walls for 3D Housing 05. Photo via CLS
Architetti.

Concrete 3D printing integrating “new, more organic
shapes”

In an interview with the architectural design
website
Wallpaper,
Massimiliano Locatelli of CLS Architetti, said that his
aesthetic vision for concrete 3D printing is “to integrate new,
more organic shapes in the surrounding landscapes or urban
architecture. I wanted to show a different way of using a
printing machine and explore how a concrete house could create
a dialogue with our memories of interior design, made of
references to archetypes of the past”

Luca Stabile, Arup’s Italy Building Practice Leader, said
“We believe 3D printing will contribute to breaking the
conventional barriers in engineering and architecture. The use
of new technologies alongside a new digital approach to the
built environment will be instrumental to creating even more
complex multi-storey 3D printed buildings.”

 

3D Housing 05's organic shape. Photo via CLS Architetti.3D Housing 05’s
organically shaped walled. Photo via CLS Architetti.

Elsewhere in the 3D printing construction sector, Siam Cement
Group
 is developing what they call

“Triple ‘S’” 3D concrete
printing
 for the construction of larger
structures. BAM Infrastructure worked with Eindhoven University
of Technology to

3D print an 8 meter concrete bicycle
bridge
, also using the CyBe RC concrete 3D
printer.

Keep posted on the latest 3D printing news from the Milan
Design Week. Subscribe to the 
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Industry newsletter
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Facebook.

Vote for the 3D printing Innovation of the year in
the 
2018
3D Printing Industry Awards
.

Post a job or advance your career in 3D printing
now.  Our
 3D Printing
Jobs
 service is now live. 


Protolabs
 is sponsoring the 2018 3D
Printing Industry Awards design
competition.
 Enter now for the chance to win a
Wanhao Duplicator 9 3D printer.

Featured image shows CyBe 3D printing arm constructing
concrete walls for 3D Housing 05. Photo via CLS
Architetti.

3D Printing news Sliced, Rick Perry, Materialise, Stratasys, SolidWorks and FIT America

This edition of our 3D printing news
digest Sliced poses and answers the following questions: Ever
wanted to Pokémon cosplay with your dog? What materials will be
used to 3D print the aircraft of the future? What new 3D
printing medical applications will come out of Mitsui
Chemicals’ latest investment? 

All this and more from Materialise, Hexcel, Thingiverse,
SolidWorks and Additive Industries. Plus – watch
Rick Perry wrestle with a dog-bone.

3D printed Pokémon masks and a model of the Antwerp City
Hall

As part of an exhibition highlighting the biggest urban
development projects in Antwerp, Belgium, Materialise has 3D printed
a
large scale model of Antwerp City Hall
using their


Mammoth Stereolithography 3D printers
.
The 3D printed city hall is 1.7 meters wide.

A Thingiverse
user, Aolesin, has created a 3D printable Cubone mask for
Pokémon loving dog owners. Get the model
here.

3D printable Cubon mask. Photo via Thingiverse user Aolesin.3D printable Cubon mask.
Photo via Thingiverse user Aolesin.

Vacuum safety and a matte PLA filament

Ruwac, a
manufacturer of industrial vacuum systems, is releasing the
NA26 immersion separation vacuum. Additive manufacturing spaces
using explosive or impact sensitive materials may produce dust
residue near ignition sources, running the risk of explosions.
The NA26 safely collects explosive or hot media particles
entering the vacuum by immediately submerging them in a
turbulent liquid bath. 

ColorFabb have
released a new 3D printing filament, PLA Semi-Matte Black. The
new filament reduces the glossy appearance of 3D prints with
PLA. It does this whilst containing no fibers, which allows
designers and engineers to use the printing settings and
temperatures they are accustomed to with most PLA
filaments.

A title 3D printed with ColorFabb's PLA Semi-Matte BlackA tile 3D printed with ColorFabb’s PLA
Semi-Matte Black. GIF via ColorFabb.

The latest partnerships and acquisitions

High-performance materials companies, Hexcel
and Arkema are
partnering to develop carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic
tapes for the aircraft of the future. A joint research and
development laboratory will be opened in France.

TriMech,
a reseller of SolidWorks CAD software and
Stratasys 3D printers,
is partnering with CNC software developer 
CAMWorks The
partnership aims to provide TriMech clients with support and
machining capabilities to better integrate design and
manufacturing processes.

B9Creations, has
received a minority investment from
Mitsui
Chemicals
, a subsidiary of the Mitsui Group.
B9Creations will leverage Mitsui’s extensive networks in
healthcare materials with the goal of developing new 3D
printing applications.

The agreement between B9Creations and Mitsui Chemicals is signed. Image via B9Creations.The agreement between
B9Creations and Mitsui Chemicals is signed. Image via
B9Creations.

Metal 3D printer company SLM Solutions’
current Chief Technology Officer, Henner Schöneborn, will
not be continuing his role after his term ends on June 30th.
Schöneborn says the decision was “amicably made, swayed by
personal reasons.” The new CTO will start August 1st, and
will be named soon. 

3D printed prosthesis manufacturer Create Orthotics &
Prosthetics
, has named Cecilia Schaffer as
their new CEO and Chair of the Board of Managers. Former CEO
Jeff Erenstone will assume the role of Chief Technology
Officer. Erenstone said “we know Cissi has the skills and
expertise to take us to the next level and beyond. This will
allow me to fully embrace my role as Chief Technology
Officer.”

Create O&P's orthotic and prosthetic 3D printing system. Photo via Create O&P.Create O&P’s orthotic
and prosthetic 3D printing system. Photo via Create O&P.

FIT
America
, part of the German FIT Additive Manufacturing
Group
, has announced Bruce Colter as its Vice
President. Colter said “We need to instill confidence in our
customers’ minds that AM will provide immediate benefits and a
path to Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) benefits. In coming days,
I will be presenting what I call our ‘Moore’s Law for AM’ which
is an approach to successful AM implementation”

Additive
Industries
is set to move their headquarters
to a new factory close to their current site, by April 2nd. The
new location will consolidate their headquarters with their
Test Operations and Development and System Assembly branches,
currently spread over two facilities in Eindhoven.

3D printing system supplier Laser Lines
has purchased a second Stratasys
Fortus 450mc to address high demand for 3D printing of

Nylon 12CF
material in jigs, fixtures and small batch
production of end use parts. Nylon 12CF is known for its
tensile strength and durability.

Matsuura, a provider
of manufacturing equipment, is now an authorised reseller of
the
HP Multi Jet Fusion
3D Printing range.

Yesterday, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry hosted a
question and answer session at the Department of
Energy’s
Lawrence
Berkeley National Laboratory
. As Secretary of
Energy, Perry oversees the running of Berkeley lab, as well as
the 16 other national laboratories under the DOE.

During the session Perry said “One of the things that I
enjoy as much about this job as anything, is going and telling
the uninitiated about what’s happening at the national labs in
this country. Your engagement in the future of the sciences, in
innovation and knowledge, is invaluable.”

Energy Secretary Rick Perry, left, and Berkeley Lab’s Raymond Weitekamp struggle to break a 3D-printed wish bone at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry. GIF via Kelly J. Owen for Berkeley Lab.Energy Secretary Rick Perry, left, and
Berkeley Lab’s Raymond Weitekamp struggle to break a 3D-printed
wish bone at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry. GIF via Kelly J.
Owen for Berkeley Lab.

Keep tabs on the latest 3D printing news. Subscribe to
the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
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 is now live. 

Vote for the OEM of the year in the 2018
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Enter the 3D
Printing Industry Awards design
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, for the chance to win a Wanhao
Duplicator 9. S
ponsored by Protolabs.

Featured image shows Materialise’s model of Antwerp
City hall. Photo via Materialise.

UK Ministry of Defence announces disruptive titanium technology, Metalysis increases funding

Metal 3D printing received a boost this week with two
announcements from the UK.

Titanium’s high strength, lightweight and resistance to
corrosion make the metal a desirable choice for applications in
aerospace, defence and healthcare. However, the cost of
titanium makes it prohibitively expensive for wider use.

The
FAST-forge initiative
, funded by
Innovate UK, aims to develop a process to make titanium
c
heaper and abundant. In turn this will allow the
development of lower cost 3D printing materials.

Safran's Landing gear which will test the application of FAST-forge titanium. Photo via Safran Group.Safran’s Landing gear
which will test the application of FAST-forge titanium. Photo via
Safran Group.

A “ground-breaking method”

Earlier this week the
UK’s Defence Secretary Gavin
Williamson
gave further details about the
project, “Our Armed Forces use titanium in everything from
cutting-edge nuclear submarines and fighter jets through to
life-changing replacement limbs – but production time and costs
mean we haven’t always used it.”

Describing the FAST-forge process as a “ground-breaking
method” Williamson added,  

[FAST-forge] is not only faster and cheaper but could
see a huge expansion of titanium parts and equipment
throughout the military. It is a clear example of how our
world-class scientists are working behind the scenes to help
our Armed Forces as well as bringing prosperity and security
to Britain.

Dr Nick Weston from the Department of
Materials Science & Engineering at the
University of
Sheffield
is one of the leaders in developing
the technology
said, “FAST-forge is a disruptive
technology that enables near net shape components to be
produced from powder or particulate in two simple processing
steps.”

Such components have mechanical properties equivalent
to forged product. For titanium alloys, FAST-forge will
provide a step change in the cost of components, allowing use
in automotive applications in automotive applications such as
powertrain and suspension systems.

The research is also funded with £30,000 from
the
Defence Science and Technology Laboratory

(Dstl) in Porton Down, UK. Matthew Lunt the
Principal Scientist for Materials Science at Dstl said, “We’re
really excited about this innovation, which could cut the
production cost of titanium parts by up to 50%. With this
reduction in cost, we could use titanium in submarines, where
corrosion resistance would extend the life, or for light-weight
requirements like armoured vehicles.”

The Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) in Porton Down has revolutionised the production of titanium by reducing the 40 stage process down to just two steps and potentially halving the cost. Crown copyright.The Defence Science and
Technology Laboratory (Dstl) in Porton Down has revolutionised
the production of titanium by reducing the 40 stage process down
to just two steps and potentially halving the cost. Crown
copyright.

Metalysis receives $17 million to advance 3D
printable metal alloy powders

Metalysis,
headquartered in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, is also involved
in the FAST-forge project. As previously reported, Metalysis is
developing the
Fray, Farthing, Chen (FFC)
Cambridge process, a method that allows the production of metal
alloys from lower priced inputs.

Opening the Metalysis Materials Discovery Center. Photo by Beau JacksonOpening the Metalysis Materials Discovery Center. Photo by Beau JacksonOpening the Metalysis
Materials Discovery Center. Photo by Beau Jackson

Specifically, the FFC process used by Metalysis takes a
solid feedstock and can produce a solid product without melting
the feedstock. The company believes that the FFC method has
application for between 30-40 elements in the periodic table,
plus the resulting alloys that can be derived from them.

The FFC method will allow the production of

spherical metal powder for metal 3D printing using inputs
that cost $2.50/kg rather than the current
$70
.

This week Metalysis announced further funding of £12m
($17m) to move forward to commercial production under the
Generation 4 (“Gen4”) scale expansion project. The funding
comes from existing shareholders
Woodford Investment
Management,
Draper Esprit PLC, ETF Partners
and Interogo Treasury.
Hercules
Capital
, Inc. (NYSE: HTGC), of California,
U.S. are a new investor in Metalysis.

A Metalysis spokesperson gave 3D Printing Industry more
details of when commercial production is expected to commence,
“We are carrying out ‘first runs’ over the coming weeks,
targeting commercial production within the next couple of
reporting quarters.”

Much of the the project remains underwraps and details of
additive manufacturing partners using metal powders made using
the solid-state process remain “commercially sensitive” with
limited details available. However, the Metalysis spokesperson
explained the project is progressing very well. “Having built
Generation 4, there are no real challenges left associated with
the technology – we have achieved industrial scale.”

In terms of future expansion, challenges will involve
assembling the ideal structure of large project funding, for
which we have lots of options, and the normal execution risk
associated with such projects of that magnitude. Obviously,
we are confident in the progress we continue to make in those
respects.

Speaking about the news, Dion Vaughan, CEO of Metalysis,
said, “Naturally, we are pleased that Metalysis has attracted
financial backing from both new and existing sophisticated
institutional investors.”

The expansion project carried out during the past year,
combined with these proceeds, will support our multi-metal
production and commercial rollout. Metalysis is a high growth
U.K. technology business with advanced materials
breakthroughs and solid-state production of great value to
its customers, shareholders, partners, and employees.

Keep up to date with the latest developments in 3D
printing. Subscribe to the
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Industry newsletter
, follow us
on
Twitter
and like us on Facebook.

Vote for your the 3D printing medical, dental or
healthcare application of the year in the

2018 3D Printing Industry
Awards
.

Our 3D Printing
Jobs
service is now live. Post a job or
advance your career in 3D printing now.


Protolabs
is sponsoring the
2018

3D Printing Industry Awards design
competition.
Enter now for the chance
to win a 3D printer.

Featured image shows an example 3D printed titanium
lattices. Photo via: Metalysis/TWI

Rapid Shape new 3D printers for hearing aid industry

Rapid
Shape
, the 3D printer manufacturer
headquartered in the South German town of Heimsheim, has
announced a new range of 3D printers for the hearing aid
industry.

The range comprises the Studio-Line HA20 II, HA30 II and
HA40 II.

Rapid Shape CEO Andreas Schultheiss
said, “The new Hearing printers make it quicker and easier than
ever to produce professional and biocompatible hearing aid
parts. Rapid Shape has worked closely with our customers and
material partners to develop the new generation of 3D printers
that meet and exceed current needs.”

Our optional remote maintenance is a win-win for
customer, material partner and system manufacturer. The total
costs could be reduced by up to 50% while preserving medical
device directive compliant processes.

The HA20 II can 3D print multiple ear pieces in under 30
minutes, and is intended to facilitate in-house production at a
shop leve. While the HA30 II and HA40 II are focused on higher
production capacity. One feature of the HA30 II is the compact
device dimension, while the HA40 II has a slightly larger
building platform (150 x 85 mm) and additional technical
functions can already be used by larger laboratories and
producers.

Rapid Shape says the automatic platform changer
complements the high-speed, industrial-scale HA90 speed series
and enables robust, automated processes at lowest unit costs.
Optional remote maintenance contracts significantly reduce
maintenance costs and ensure with medical device law compliant
manufacturing processes.

Hearing aids are not the only medical and healthcare
applications Rapid Shape works with. In mid-2017,

Swiss dental company Straumann purchased a 35% holding in
Rapid Shape to further advancement of digital dentistry and
progress

3D printing technology for the dental
sector
.

The new models will be presented for the first time from
23rd to 25th March 2018 at the Congrès des audioprothésistes,
in Paris (France), a trade fair specialized in hearing
acoustics.

Keep up to date with the latest developments in 3D
printing. Subscribe to the
3D Printing
Industry newsletter
, follow us
on
Twitter
and like us on Facebook.

Vote for your the 3D printing medical, dental or
healthcare application of the year in the

2018 3D Printing Industry
Awards
.

Our 3D Printing
Jobs
service is now live. Post a job or
advance your career in 3D printing now.


Protolabs
is sponsoring the
2018

3D Printing Industry Awards design
competition.
Enter now for the chance to
win a 3D printer.

Featured image shows the Rapid Shape D20 3D printer. Image via
Rapid Shape.

MachineWorks’ Polygonica software new advanced automated hole filling features

Sheffield, UK, based MachineWorks
has released a new hole filling tool as part of
their
Polygonica
mesh editing software for 3D models.

Sometimes the shape of an object prevents the easy 3D
scanning of its entire surface. In these cases the resultant 3D
model will have holes. Filling these holes is an often time
consuming process and when automated can yield imperfect
results, smoothing over details that existed in the physical
object, and producing an inaccurate 3D model.

Polygonica’s new hole filling algorithms use data in the
original geometry of a scan, and should hopefully reduce the
time needed to prepare a scan for 3D printing.

Polygonica's new hole filling feature. Image via MachineWorks.Polygonica’s new hole
filling feature. Image via MachineWorks.

Advanced mesh repair features 

Multithreaded code has been implemented, granting
performance improvements on multicore processors. New
algorithms use existing scan data to improve the filling of
large holes. Both improve the speed of hole filling.

Holes containing mesh fragments, “annular holes”, will be
filled more effectively by algorithms matching features of the
fragments to the hole. A new fill type applies features on one
side of a hole and extends them across the hole. Polygonica say
this is often more effective, and maintains more detail than
simply finding a minimum area or smooth fill for the
hole.

The advanced hole filling features together with
Polygonica’s existing repair functions will help ensure models
are watertight, free of badly oriented planes,
self-intersections, and closer to being ready for 3D
printing.

Larger holes processed, keeping detail. Image via PolygonicaLarger holes processed,
whilst keeping detail with Polygonica. Image via Polygonica

Automated processing of 3D models

Polygonica’s automated processing of 3D models is a key
feature of Stratasys’

GrabCAD Print software
. Dr Fenqiang Lin,
MachineWorks Managing Director, said “GrabCAD and Polygonica
share the same philosophy of enabling a single ‘click-to-print’
methodology for 3D models. The user doesn’t want or need to
know about what software is used to prepare the file, they just
want their CAD model printed with the minimum of fuss.”

Less extensive automated hole filling options are also
available with software like
Artec
Studio
. Peel 3D’s $6,000 handheld
3D scanner
uses proprietary software to
automate hole filling and the smoothing of edges.

For more information about Polygonica’s capabilities and
applications, you can read the 3D Printing Industry article
about our 
visit
to Polygonica
.

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Wanhao Duplicator 9 3D printer.

Featured image shows Larger holes processed, whilst
keeping detail with Polygonica. Image via Polygonica.

 

The Virtual Foundry’s alternative to costly metal AM systems: Open, Safe, Priced to Compete

The
Virtual Foundry
set out to make metal 3D printing realistic
for everyone with an FDM printer. The dream comes true with
Filamet™, their line of sinterable FDM metal
filaments.

Open: The Virtual Foundry prides itself on
developing these filaments within an open architecture model.
Filamet™ delivers in printers from the most humble home
versions to the most robust industrial systems. If it prints
PLA, it prints Filamet™. In fact, no special adjustments or
equipment are necessary. These 85+% metal filaments print just
like PLA with settings recognized by the beginning and
experienced user alike.

The Virtual Foundry President, Tricia Suess,
appreciates the team’s approach. “It’s quite thrilling to be on
the front edge of metal 3D printing technology. Brad and his
team have developed something here that changes how work is
done. Our innovative people have created a product within an
open architecture that increases the efficiencies of current
work systems and expands the value of our customers’ product
offerings.”

Rodin's The Thinker, 3D printed in Bronze Filamet. Photo via Virtual FoundryRodin’s The Thinker,
3D printed in Bronze Filamet. Photo via Virtual Foundry

Safe: Filamet™ is made of metal powder encased in
a binder of non-toxic, environmentally friendly, biodegradable
and carbon neutral polymers. That means safer operation and no
exposed powdered metals.

While prints made with Filamet™ can be polished to a
beautiful shine in their green state, many applications dictate
post-processing. Filamet™ again surpasses other metal AM
solutions by debinding with simple heat – no catalysts, no
solvents, no safety risk.

Priced to Compete: Create high quality, high
purity, 100% metal objects at a fraction of the cost of current
metal printing systems. Since Filamet™ can be used in any FDM
printer, all printer brands are options. Since objects printed
with Filamet™ can be sintered in common industrial furnaces,
this hardware can sourced from a wide variety of industrial
suppliers.

Benn Simms of Ledwell Plastics writes, “After finding
an article on The Virtual Foundry’s Filamet™ I immediately saw
the potential for this exciting product and wanted to be
involved. I’m very excited to have the opportunity to work with
them and explore the possibilities for this product in the
injection moulding industry….Injection mould tooling is a very
expensive and time consuming process. This has the potential to
massively de skill it for minimum outlay and hugely improve
production times.”

Open architecture FDM Metal systems built around Filamet™
can be put together for as little as $5000.

The Virtual
Foundry
guarantees metal printing success with its open,
safe, and economical metal 3D printing filaments.

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Featured image shows the metal 3D printed NIST test
artifact. Photo via NIST

Featured image shows a figure 3D printed on an FDM machine
in Stainless Steel Filamet. Photo via Virtual Foundry

Berkeley Lab develops 3D printed water with flexible electronic potential

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National
Laboratory
have 3D printed liquid structures using a
modified
Qidi X-one
3D printer.

The researchers say the novel technique has a number of
potential applications in areas such as flexible “liquid
electronics,” medical research and chemical synthesis.

The modified Qidi X-One. A syringe and needle extrudes threads of water into a container of silicone oil. Photo via Berkeley Labs' YouTube.The modified Qidi
X-one. A syringe and needle extrudes threads of water into a
container of silicone oil. Photo via Berkeley Labs’ YouTube.

Modifying the X-one 3D printer

The 3D printed threads of water are between 10 microns, twice
the width of a human red blood cell, and 1mm thick.

Tom Russell, a visiting faculty scientist in Berkeley Lab’s
Materials Sciences Division,
said
the X-one 3D printer was crucial for printing liquids
at the micron scale, allowing researchers to “place threads of
water anywhere we want in three dimensions.” The X-one injects
threads of water through a needle, creating liquid tube
structures suspended in a container of oil.

To achieve this the researchers use a modified Qidi X-one 3D
printer. The X-one’s original print head is replaced by a
syringe and needle, which extrudes water into a small container
of oil placed on the X-one’s print bed. A custom software
program, written by Joe Forth, a postdoctoral researcher in the
Materials Sciences Division, enables the X-one’s use in this
application.

Water supported by gold particle and polymer ligand
layer

A surfactant formed of a polymer ligand and gold particles
allows the water to form stable structures. Water is mixed with
gold particles which are attracted to polymer ligands in the
silicone oil. When water is injected into the oil the ligands
attach to the gold nanoparticles in the water, forming a
surfactant that researchers are calling a “supersoap”.

Surfactants, “surface active agents”, lower the surface tension
between two liquids. The supersoap surfactant is a flexible
layer of polymer ligands attached to gold particles, which
forms on the surface of the water. The flexible layer contains
and prevents the water from breaking apart.

The flexibility granted by the supersoap “means we can stretch
water into a tube, and it remains a tube. Or we can shape water
into an ellipsoid, and it remains an ellipsoid. We’ve used
these nanoparticle supersoaps to print tubes of water that last
for several months.”

Diagram showing the structure of the nanoparticle supersoap. Gold particles in water attract polymer ligands, forming a flexible layer, the supersoap. Image via Berkeley Lab.Diagram showing the
structure of the nanoparticle supersoap. Gold particles in water
attract polymer ligands, forming a flexible layer around the tube
of water. Image via Berkeley Lab.

Liquid electronics for flexible devices

Russell believes that the 3D printed liquid material could be
used for the construction of flexible, stretchable devices.
Researchers also believe the liquid material could be used
limit the flow of certain molecules, potentially enabling new
ways of separating molecules, or building new compounds.
Russell explains,

“It’s a new class of material that can reconfigure itself,
and it has the potential to be customized into liquid
reaction vessels for many uses, from chemical synthesis to
ion transport to catalysis,”

The material was developed by Russell and Forth, along with
scientists from Berkeley Lab and other institutions.

Close up of tubes of water suspended in oil. Image via Berkeley Labs' YouTube.Close up of the 3D
printed water suspended in oil. Image via Berkeley Labs’ YouTube.


MIT’s rapid liquid 3D printing
similarly suspends liquid
material in another liquid. At Design Miami, the process was
used to produce rubber-like bags and lamps, with the potential
to create large scale consumer items like furniture.

A paper titled “Reconfigurable Printed Liquids” detailing
the specifics of the 3D printing method discussed in the
article is published online in Advanced Materials journal. It
is co-authored by Joe Forth, Xubo Liu, Jaffar Hasnain,
Anju Toor, Karol Miszta, Shaowei Shi, Phillip L. Geissler, Todd
Emrick, Brett A. Helms and Thomas P. Russell.

Keep up to date with the latest 3D printing processes.
Subscribe to the 
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 is now live. Post a job or
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 is sponsoring the 2018 3D
Printing Industry Awards design
competition.
 Enter now for the chance to win a
Wanhao Duplicator 9 3D printer.

Featured image shows a close up of 3D printed water
suspended in oil. Image via Berkeley Labs.

Volvo CE 3D printing and delivering replacement parts

Volvo Construction
Equipment
, Volvo Group’s construction
division, is now 3D printing and delivering spare parts in as
little as one week. The company is also using 3D printing for
the development of prototype machinery.

Volvo is using thermoplastics to 3D print the spare parts.
Currently, only plastic replacement parts are available.

Efficiency and cost benefits passed to customers

Jasenko Lagumdzija, Volvo CE’s Manager of Business
Support, says the move should help Volvo CE “support customers
through the life cycle of their equipment. It’s especially good
for older machines where parts are no longer made efficiently
[with]traditional production methods. Producing new parts by
3D printing with thermoplastics cuts down on time and costs, so
it’s an efficient way of helping customers.”

Drawing from the company’s archives of 3D models and
drawings, parts are available for any unit in Volvo CE’s range
of off-road machinery. Volvo CE’s Aftermarket Branding Manager,
Annika Fries, says the “3D [printed]parts have the same
specifications and go through the same processes as the
original, and get the same warranty.”

3D printing parts on demand lowers inventory levels
needed, saving space in warehouses, and allowing the purchase
price of 3D printed parts to be “comparable to that of a
traditionally manufactured component.”

Volvo CE's EC950E crawler is one of the many machines which the company will be 3D printing spare parts for. Photo via Volvo CEVolvo CE’s EC950E
crawler is one of the many machines which the company will be 3D
printing spare parts for. Photo via Volvo CE

Extending the functional lifetime of Volvo CE’s machines

Fast delivery times, and no minimum order quantities
should minimise the downtime of customers’ equipment, whilst
extending the working life of Volvo CE’s older machines. Volvo
CE say they are currently considering extending the catalogue
of 3D printed parts offered to include Metal 3D printed
parts.

Easy rapid prototyping with 3D printing

Though Volvo CE has announced no plans to use 3D printing
in the manufacture of its machines, the company is using 3D
printing to quickly prototype the components of new machinery.
Fredrick Andersson, Development Engineer for Wheel Loaders
Powertrain Installation at Volvo CE, said “We have a lot of
knowledge and we can make changes quickly and easily with 3D
printing. Because of this, it means that the time to market for
a new product is quicker.”

A 3D printed workshop tool for mounting parts on an axle. Photo via Volvo CE.A 3D printed workshop
tool for mounting parts on an axle. Photo via Volvo CE.

Electrolux, the Swedish domestic appliance manufacturer,
is

trialling the use of 3D printing to produce spare
parts
for customers on demand. Spare Parts 3D
is a start-up working to simplify the inventory
management of spare parts by

helping companies shift from large warehouses to digital
libraries of 3D parts
and a distributed
network of 3D printers.