HP partners with CDC to test and bioprint antibiotics

HP has announced its participation in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) pilot program that aims to develop new antibiotics designed to fight antimicrobial-resistant bacteria.

According to the CDC, a U.S. healthcare organization, infectious diseases with resistant organisms caused by antibiotics are difficult to treat, requiring costly and sometimes toxic alternatives. With HP’s bioprinting technology, microbiologists are able to print antibiotics samples for testing directed at halting the spread of such bacteria.

“Bacteria continuously develop new ways to resist antibiotics—once a drug is approved for use, the countdown begins until resistance emerges,” said Jean Patel, PH.D. D (ABMM), Science Team Lead, Antibiotic Resistance Coordination and Strategy Unit at CDC.

The HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter. Photo via HP.
The HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter. Photo via HP.

The HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter

The ability of a microbe to resist the effects of medication, i.e., antimicrobial resistance, remains an international public health issue as it opens the door for a plethora of diseases to spread, states the CDC. Without proper testing, new drugs used to combat such bacteria can contribute to the presence of antimicrobial resistance. 

Thus, with the use of an HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter researchers can properly analyze the behavior of antimicrobial bacteria for effective antibiotics. Similar to the set-up of a regular ink printer, the HP Bioprinter dispenses volumes from picoliters to microliters of small molecules for drug discovery, and research into microbiological structures(genomics and proteomics).

In an effort to develop new antibiotics, the CDC is also planning to deploy HP BioPrinters within its Antibiotic Resistance (AR) Lab Network across four regional areas in U.S. Additionally, California-based pharmaceutical company Gilead, is using the HP BioPrinter to develop tests for drugs used against the Ebola virus.

“To save lives and protect people, it is vital to make technology accessible to hospital labs nationwide. We hope this pilot will help ensure our newest drugs last longer and put gold-standard lab results in healthcare providers’ hands faster,” added Patel.

As of yet, there is no news on whether HP is developing a 3D bioprinter.

Combating diseases with 3D printing

Earlier this month, researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, presented a 3D printed solution for combating superbugs – a strain of bacteria immune to antibiotics. The Printed Fluorescence Imaging Box (PFI Box), assembled from six 3D printed walls, acts as an experimental chamber for bacteria.

LED lights within the box are used to excite the bacteria’s fluorescent proteins, then a Raspberry Pi processor records the data from this reaction to be analyzed for an appropriate and innovative drug response.

Prior to this, researchers from Northeastern University, inspired by the naturally repellent surface of cicada insect wings, began using Oxford Performance Materials’ (OPM) 3D printed PEKK plastic to develop anti-infection orthopedic devices.

For more of the latest 3D printing news subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter and follow us on Twitter, and Facebook.

Pursuing a career in additive manufacturing or looking for skilled individuals in the field? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows the HP D300e Digital Dispenser BioPrinter. Photo via HP.

MIT’s direct-write colloid 3D printing unlocks new possibilities in electronics and energy

Working on the nanoscale, MIT researchers have 3D printed centimeter-long structures that could change the face of electronics and optical sensors. The method relies on the self-assembly principles of colloids – particles between 1 nm and 1 μm wide.

In the method, billions of polystyrene colloids fuse together to build structures programmed by the research team. Alvin Tan, a graduate student in MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, explains how using different particles such as metal alloys, and quantum dots could unlock a range of possibilities for the method. He says,

“Combining [colloids]into different crystal structures and forming them into different geometries for novel device architectures, I think that would be very effective in fields including sensing, energy storage, and photonics.”

A revolution for 3D printing

Colloids are typically found suspended in a liquid or gas. Milk is one common example of a colloid, as it is made of microscopic butterfat globules suspended in a water-based solution.

Colloidal self-assembly is the process that happens when particles in this liquid or gas come into contact with on another, and fuse together to form a new, larger solid.

“If you blew up each particle to the size of a soccer ball,” says Tan, a “it would be like stacking a whole lot of soccer balls to make something as tall as a skyscraper,”

“That’s what we’re doing at the nanoscale.”

MIT's Direct-Write colloid 3D printing process and X-ray imagery of the 3D printed colloidal structure. Image via Advanced Materials
MIT’s Direct-Write colloid 3D printing process and X-ray imagery of the 3D printed colloidal structure. Image via Advanced Materials

Overall, the process presents scientists with the opportunity to program a material’s structure from the ground up. This means that researchers could make entirely new materials with properties that aren’t possible with traditional chemistry.

Colloidal self assembly has been likened to 3D printing as, essentially, new solid structures are built by layering multiple colloids. In a previous study on the method conducted at New York University Stefano Saccana, assistant professor of chemistry, said, “Colloidal self-assembly has the potential to revolutionize 3D printing.”

3D printing crystals

At MIT, direct-write 3D printing is used to dictate the shape of colloids.

The team uses a custom-made apparatus for the process, arranging a needle above two aluminum plates which form the print bed.

In total, three different water-based colloid inks were tested in the study: one containing polystyrene particles, one with silica and one with gold. These inks were extruded through the needle on to the aluminum plates.

As the plates are heated, the water content of the ink dissipates, leaving only colloids that fuse together. To make a demonstrative helical structure from the ink, the build plate is moved underneath the needle.

Freeform 3D printing of a helical structure from colloids. Image by Alvin Tan/MIT
Freeform 3D printing of a helical structure from colloids. Image by Alvin Tan/MIT

By changing the size of the particles, the team also succeeded in creating structures that reflect different colors. MIT graduate student Justin Beroz explians, “By changing the size of these particles, you drastically change the color of the structure. It’s due to the way the particles are assembled, in this periodic, ordered way, and the interference of light as it interacts with particles at this scale,”

“We’re essentially 3D-printing crystals.”

The results of the team’s most recent work, “Direct‐Write Freeform Colloidal Assembly” is published in Advanced Materials journal. It is co-authored by Alvin T. L. Tan, Justin Beroz, Mathias Kolle and A. John Hart.

For more of the latest cutting edge research subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, find us on Facebook and like us on Twitter. Looking for jobs in academia? Search open opportunities and apply with 3D Printing Jobs. You can also make a profile to advertise your latest vacancies.

Featured image shows crystals 3D printed from colloids at MIT. Photo by Felice Frankel/MIT.

Consolidation in medical 3D printing market, K2M acquired by Stryker in $1.4 billion deal

Virginia medical device manufacturer K2M is to be acquired by Michigan headquartered FORTUNE 500 medical technology firm Stryker (NYSE:SYK). Both companies apply 3D printing technology to the production of spinal implants. In the terms of the acquisition, K2M is to become a wholly owned subsidiary of Stryker at the aquisition price of $27.50 per share, generating a total value in the region of $1.4 billion.

Kevin A. Lobo, Chairman and CEO at Stryker, commented:

“This acquisition underscores our commitment to the spinal market, which is the largest segment of orthopaedics with significant unmet needs,”

“We believe K2M will significantly enhance our presence with surgeons, patients and employees in both the spine and related neurotechnology markets.”

3D printed spinal implants

Founded in 1941, Stryker distributes a broad catalog of products from implants used in joint replacement to surgical navigation systems. 3D printing technology at the company is marketed in the Tritanium (titanium alloy) spinal implant range which has achieved FDA clearance a number of times for various applications. Stryker’s 3D printed Tritanium implants are porous, a feature which helps promote the in-growth of cell tissues.

In a recent partnership, Stryker became a distributor for Virtual Surgical Planning (VSP) and 3D printed anatomical models from 3D Systems.

K2M was founded in 2004. The company’s portfolio includes minimally invasive implants, such as the adjustable MOJAVE 3D printed spinal support implant, biologics, and treatments for complex spine injuries, such as the CAPRI cage system made which recently passed CE qualification after a successful operation in Denmark.

The MOJAVE PL 3D spinal lumbar cage. Image via K2M
The MOJAVE PL 3D spinal lumbar cage. Image via K2M

A $10 billion opportunity

Stryker’s acquisition of K2M is expected to close by the end of Q4 2018, subject to customary closing conditions, and stockholders/regulatory approval. The transaction has so far been approved by both companies’ Board of Directors.

According to Eric D. Major, Chairman, CEO, and President of K2M, “Joining Stryker will be a very exciting next chapter for our global team and surgeon customers around the world,”

“Stryker’s established leadership in the orthopedic and neurosurgical market, combined with K2M’s culture of innovation and leadership in complex spine and minimally invasive solutions, represent a powerful opportunity for Stryker to strengthen its leadership in the $10 billion global spine market.”

For more business and medical 3D printing updates sign up to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Search and post 3D Printing Jobs to seek opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows design for Stryker’s 3D printed Titanium lumbar cages. Image via Stryker

Review: The DOBOT Magician all in one robot for education

The DOBOT Magician is a multifunctional robot arm built to be capable of 3D printing, laser engraving and pick and place. Marketed as an “all in one robot for education” the system is designed to introduce students to programming. At 3D Printing Industry, our engineering team recently tested the DOBOT Magician to see how suitable it is for these intended uses.

The key claims of the arm are: easy-interchangeable tools, multiple means of control, programmability, and suitability for the classroom, home, workshop or factory. Each of these claims are retained for perspective throughout this review.

Boxed DOBOT Magician Photo by 3D Printing Industry
Boxed DOBOT Magician Photo by 3D Printing Industry

Unboxing and assembly

Like the previously tested DOBOT MOOZ the Magician was securely packaged when it arrived, with all contents sectioned separately. Schematics on smaller boxes help the user identify components inside, and an enclosed guide makes unpacking easy taking only 5 minutes.

Boxes with schematics help speedy unpacking. Photo by 3D Printing Industry
Boxes with schematics help speedy unpacking. Photo by 3D Printing Industry

The manual included in the box was very brief – good for setting up first connections, and the main body of the guide is included in a further online document. Here, the team also noted that the main connection of the Magician robot arm were covered with flexible silicone lids, ensuring good dust protection, suited to use in a workshop environment.

Power supply connection was simple, and labels attached to the wires made initial setup easy. For calibration, the team installed the recommended DobotStudio software. Navigating DobotStudio was reasonably user friendly and intuitive, and offers three different calibration modes: Base Calibration, Manual Levelling and Auto Levelling. In this instance, the Auto Levelling method worked well.

DobotStudio interface. Image via 3D Printing Industry
DobotStudio interface. Image via 3D Printing Industry

As initially claimed, it is easy to switch between the various tools available. Applying a filament holder and feeder for 3D printing was also intuitive, and each head/module is mounted using a screw.

The robot arm after setup. Photo by 3D Printing Industry
The robot arm after setup. Photo by 3D Printing Industry

3D printing test on the DOBOT Magician

The DOBOT Magician claims a print size of 150 x 150 x 150 mm, layer resolution ranging between 100 – 200 μm, and an ability to use standard 1.75 mm PLA on a non-heated glass bed, a component also easily installed on the system. With the 3D Printer component selected in DobotStudio the software seamlessly switched to RepetierHost for printing.

Extrusion tests. Photo via 3D Printing Industry
Extrusion tests. Photo via 3D Printing Industry

For this test, three different files were tried: a simple cup, a 3DBenchy, and a complex Great Wall of China model. Throughout each job, it was easy to remove the printhead when clogging occurred.

In these tests, the engineering team discovered that the Magician is more suited to 3D printing simple structures like the cup. However, the DOBOT Magician was not suitable for 3D printing more complex objects, due to the spanning required in these models. At a print speed of 1 mm/s the engineers succeeded in producing two sizes of the simple cup model, with some removable stringing on the inside of each one.

3D printed low poly Squirtle. Photo via DOBOT

Writing, drawing and laser engraving

With writing and drawing modes for the DOBOT Magician the team were first impressed by the variety of tools available. A pen, gel pen, paint brush, and other writing implements could all be mounted to this gripper, highlighting the robot’s expressed purpose as an education tool. As in the 3D printing test, DobotStudio integration of the Write & Draw component was seamless. The interface gave a clear indication of the max writing envelope the Magician is capable of.

The claims made of the Writing and Drawing module is a repeatability position accuracy of ±0.2 mm. Here, the engineers tested a writing sample of “3D Printing Industry” with the Magician, and a simple drawing of a flower.

Flower drawing by the DOBOT Magician. Photo via 3D Printing Industry
Flower drawing by the DOBOT Magician. Photo via 3D Printing Industry

Both outputs were of a decent quality though repeatability did not match the degree of accuracy, but this could be improved by using thicker pens.

The Laser Engraving module of DobotStudio had a very similar layout to Write & Draw which made it easy to use. This tool worked best on engraving wood, but a slower writing speed would be required for engraving paper and leather.

The Pneumatic Gripper/Suction Cup

The pneumatic pump attachment for the DOBOT Magician can be used as suction cup for pick and place of objects, and as a gripper for moving objects for a programmed purpose.

As with all modules, the pneumatic pump is easy to mount. In the first test the cup was able to carefully lift, move and rotate two boxes, one stacked on top of the other, without dropping the unsupported box.

Movement of two stacked boxes. Photo via 3D Printing Industry
Movement of two stacked boxes. Photo via 3D Printing Industry

Secondly, the gripper made easy work of lifting, moving and rotating, a roll of tape, and then successfully lifted and leveller moved a pair of pliers, weighing around 200g, with no difficulties at all.

The arm moves heavier objects with ease and keeps them level. Photo via 3D Printing Industry
The arm moves heavier objects with ease and keeps them level. Photo via 3D Printing Industry

In a final test, the team put DobotStudio’s Blocky integration to the test. Blockly is a user-friendly, open source software developed by Google to make it easy to write programming languages. This feature of DobotStudio was very impressive and proved easy to learn. Using a sample pick and place program outline in the manual, the team created an operation for the DOBOT Magician enabling it to pick and place two stacked boxes from one spot to another specified location.

Example Blockly Script. Photo via 3D Printing Industry
Example Blockly Script. Photo via 3D Printing Industry

Connectivity

The wireless gamepad controller of the DOBOT Magician worked well, especially when used for controlling pneumatic pick and place. Even 10 m away from the system, it was still within range for full control.

The wireless gamepad controller performed well, even up to 10m away. Photo via 3D Printing Industry
The wireless gamepad controller performed well, even up to 10m away. Photo via 3D Printing Industry

The mouse control worked as expected, and the Magician followed its movements efficiently. Bluetooth control was access via a Dobot Magician App, however the module on the Magician had some difficulties picking up the Bluetooth signal from the phone.

Final verdict

In conclusion, the engineers summarized that the DOBOT Magician has much to offer. According to our team “It has taken a significantly novel step towards educating the next generation in an unprecedented effective way, by enabling itself to be controlled through simple tailored programs that can be coded by young programmers.”

As stated, tools were easy to mount and remove, and DobotStudio gave a lot of scope for educational use. Programmability was a key strength of the system, and its compact size is suited to placement in the classroom, home or workshop.

For more exclusive news and reviews subscribe to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, find us on Facebook and like us on Twitter. Looking for jobs in engineering? Search open opportunities and apply with 3D Printing Jobs. You can also make a profile to advertise your latest vacancies.

Featured image shows the DOBOT Magician robot arm. Photo via DOBOT

3D printing jobs update: DigiFabster, DyeMansion GmbH, LINK3D, and Hot Pop Factory

Our 3D Printing Industry Job Board continues to grow with users finding new 3D printing careers and employers filling vacancies created by the demand for additive manufacturing specialists.

In this 3D printing jobs update, we highlight additive manufacturing enterprises from across Europe and North America who are seeking specialists in marketing and sales.

To apply for any of these additive manufacturing jobs, sign up now for free.

Employers looking for qualified candidates with expert knowledge of the 3D printing industry can also reach our audience, again for no charge.

The 3D Printing Industry Jobs Board.

Sales Development Representative at DigiFabster, Amsterdam, Netherlands

DigiFabster is a California-headquartered software company that provides cloud-based CRM and instant quotation solutions for 3D printing. The company is seeking a new member to join the team in Europe. Specifically, a Sales Development Representative who will be based in Amsterdam.

Prospective employees must have more than 3 years of experience in technology industry sales and a deep knowledge of CNC, 3D printing, and other manufacturing processes. Applicants must have a proven track record in sales, and a client base or established contacts in the market. Advanced proficiency in English is required, while fluency in German or French is a plus.

This 3D printing job will involve management of the pipeline and advancing sales opportunities. The Sales Development Representative will share relevant case studies and solution ROI metrics, and perform online or in person product sales presentations.

Apply now for the DigiFabster Sales Development Representative.

Marketing Manager at DyeMansion GmbH, Planegg, Germany

DyeMansion GmbH, a German-based producer of finishing systems for 3D printed parts, is searching for a Marketing Manager in Planegg, Germany.

To apply, candidates must hold a degree in marketing, economics, media management or have completed a relevant training course. Required skills include a familiarity with content management systems, a proficiency in speaking German and English and SEO strategies. The role is especially for B2B marketing purposes, and a passion for 3D printing is essential.

The successful applicant will be responsible for creating sales/marketing campaigns and webinars, planning 3D printing industry-related trade fairs and customer events, and upholding the global marketing strategy.

The company provides a permanent position with a performance-based wage, free daily fresh fruits and drinks, and the possibility of relocation in North America or Asia.

Apply here to become a Marketing Manager for DyeMansion.

DyeMansion’s industrial post-processing systems fo AM: Powershot C for automated depowdering, DM60 coloring system, Powershot S for automated surface finish [L-R]
DyeMansion’s industrial post-processing systems for AM: Powershot C for automated depowdering, DM60 coloring system, Powershot S for automated surface finish [L-R]

Sales Leader at LINK3D, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

LINK3D, a provider of additive manufacturing workflow optimization software, is recruiting a Sales Leader in Frankfurt am Main, Germany.

A Bachelor’s Degree in business or marketing is required for this position, though a Master’s Degree is preferred. Applicants will have experience in direct sales management with large accounts or CXO level contacts, proven understanding of B2B, B2G and direct sales models, and fluency in both German and English.

This role requires a motivated individual to drive sales and support multiple market segments within the assigned territories. The Sales Leader will be required to master LINK3D product offerings with the best pitch and develop strategic marketing initiatives.

LINK3D offers a competitive salary, stock options, and uncapped commission on sales.

Apply for the position of Sales Leader at LINK3D here.

Real time collaboration in the Digital Factory. Image via LINK3D
Real-time collaboration in the Digital Factory. Image via LINK3D

Digital Content Marketing Associate at Hot Pop Factory, Ontario, Canada

Hot Pop Factory is a specialist 3D printing and laser cutting service bureau based in Canada. The company is currently seeking a Digital Content Marketing Associate based in Toronto, Ontario.

Candidates must hold a degree in Marketing or possess relevant related experience, with more than 2 years of content marketing experience. Applications should prove a track record of successful campaigns, and must demonstrate knowledge of Google Suite, CRM software, CMS platforms. Proficiency in Google Adwords, Google Analytics, and Search Console is a plus.

The successful candidate will be responsible for implementing SEO campaigns by conducting keyword planning, research, and testing. Identifying and maintaining relationships with social influencers, journalists, and partners is an important part of the role alongside an ability to track relevant social trends.

The company offers health and dental care benefits, free access to 3D printers and laser cutters onsite, and the use of a rooftop solarium and patio for meetings and lunches.

Get more info about this 3D printing marketing job here.

Create a free profile now and advance your additive manufacturing career. Or hire new talents by posting 3D printing jobs.

Read our latest 3D printing news. Subscribe to our Newsletter, follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn, and like us on Facebook.

U.S. Marines use 3D printing to rapidly construct concrete barrack

The Additive Manufacturing Team at Marine Corps Systems Command (MCSC) has 3D printed a concrete barrack in 40 hours. The 500-square-foot barrack was built at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center in Champaign, Illinois.

The barrack will serve as a test for further military use of concrete for 3D printing construction.

“In active or simulated combat environments, we don’t want Marines out there swinging hammers and holding plywood up,” said Captain Matthew Friedell, project officer in MCSC’s Operations. “Having a concrete printer that can make buildings on demand is a huge advantage for Marines operating down range.”

3D printed barrack. Photo via Marine Corps
3D printed barrack. Photo via Marine Corps.

The Marine’s concerte 3D printed construction

This new barrack acts as an improvement on the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ previous 3D printed cement barrack. The previous barrack, known as B-Hut, was created by Automated Construction of Expeditionary Structures (ACES) and marked the military’s first foray into concrete 3D printing.

The new barrack was designed using a CAD file stored on a military hardened laptop, which sent the design to the 3D printer. The 3D printer then used a sliding metal gantry, mounted with a print head and mixer pump, to print the barrack by continuously layering concrete onto a flat stone base.

The barrack was printed with the U.S. Army’s expeditionary concrete composite, as a joint effort between the two branches.

By using 3D printing for construction, the military hope to be able to build stronger barracks at a faster rate. According to the Marines, constructing a wood barrack would require 10 Marines and 5 days, but with concrete 3D printing, a sturdier barrack can be built with 4 marines in 40 hours.

While the U.S. armed forces have 3D printed large structures in the past, they are often not done onsite or all at once. According to Captain Friedell, this barrack is the military’s first onsite continuous concrete print. It could potentially allow for faster construction in more remote areas.

The Captain later added that though the Navy and Marine Corps are the first military services on site in natural disasters, they have always struggled to provide proper shelter in a timely manner. With 3D printing construction, the military can quickly provide sturdy replacements for homes, schools, and community buildings.

The Marine research team hopes the concrete 3D printing technology will be used in a full range of military operations, from combat environments to humanitarian aid.

“This capability would enable a great partnership with the local community because it is low cost, easy to use, and robotics could print the buildings,” Friedell said. “We can bring forward better structures, houses and forward operating bases with less manpower and fewer Marines in harm’s way.”

Marines observing the printing process. Photo via Marine Corps.
Marines observing the printing process. Photo via Marine Corps.

Improvements in 3D printing for construction

Other organizations have also begun taking advantage of 3D printed construction. Last year, MIT’s Mediated Matter lab used expanding foam and concrete to 3D print a dome shaped building in under 14 hours.

Similarly, the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) have used clay 3D printing for eco-friendly construction. Earlier this year, Valencia based company Be More 3D, used cement 3D printing to create an entire home in 12 hours.

Recently, in France, the Ramdani family became the first family to ever move into a 3D printed home.

Want to stay up to date on 3D printing news like this? Then sign up to our 3D Printing Industry newsletter. Alternatively, you can follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Looking to join an innovative additive manufacturing firm? Search open opportunities and apply with 3D Printing Jobs.

Featured image shows the concrete barrack being constructed. Photo via Marine Corps.

3D Printing News Sliced Renishaw, Nano Dimension, PyroGenesis, Sigma Labs, Nanoscribe, Nanovis

Today’s edition of Sliced, the 3D Printing Industry news digest, features 4D printing materials from the University of Colorado Boulder, Q2 2018 results from PyroGenesis,  FDA 510(k) clearance and $5.5 million investments for Nanovis’ titanium PEEK spinal implants and more.

A square peg into a round hole

Engineers from the University of Colorado Boulder (CU Boulder) have developed a shape-shifting polymer (4D printing) structure, using liquid crystalline elastomers (LCEs) and light and heat stimuli. The research paper states that the readily shape-programmable LCEs can form “predictable, complex, and fully reversible shape changes, thus enabling the literal square peg to fit into a round hole.”

“The ability to form materials that can repeatedly oscillate back and forth between two independent shapes by exposing them to light will open up a wide range of new applications and approaches to areas such as additive manufacturing, robotics, and biomaterials,”, said Christopher Bowman, Senior Author of the study and a Distinguished Professor in CU Boulder’s Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (CHBE).

PyroGenesis Q2 report displays revenue decreases

Canada’s PyroGenesis, a manufacturer of spherical metal powders using patented plasma processes, has announced Q2 2018 Results which includes revenues of $1.4 million, a 35% decrease from the $2.2 million posted in Q2 2017. In addition, PyroGenesis’s Gross margin of 34.9% shows a 13.1% decrease from the same period in Q2, 2017. The results also included a backlog of signed contracts valuing $4.1 million.

Nanovis’ Titanium PEEK spinal implants received FDA clearance

Following the completion of a $5.5 million investment round, Nanovis, an Indiana-based surgical implant manufacturer, has received FDA 510(k) clearance for its FortiCore TLIF and PLIF interbody spinal implants which features a “nanosurface-enhanced deeply porous titanium scaffold intermolded with a PEEK core.”

Alan McGee, M.D., of Orthopedics Northeast in Fort Wayne, explained that Nanovis offers “the most advanced interbody fixation technology with the best imaging profile on the market.”

“My partners and I have implanted over 300 FortiCore interbodies. It’s easy for me to assess bone growth through and around the FortiCore implants with plain X-ray. It’s a struggle to assess bone growth through 3D printed titanium interbodies with plain X-ray and I’m hesitant to expose my patients to the extra radiation from an unnecessary CT scan.”

Key investors in the $5.5 million investment round included Elevate Ventures, 1st Source Capital Corporation, Purdue’s Foundry Investment Fund, Commenda Capital, and Ellipsis Ventures.

The Forticore TLIF 3D printed titanium PEEK implants. Photo via Nanovis.

Woven concrete 3D printed street furniture

Berlin-based designers, Studio 7.5, and XtreeE, a Parisian large-scale 3D printing firm, have collaborated to create a series of continuously 3D printed concrete woven-patterned benches. The benches were printed using XtreeE’s six-axis 3D printing robot, which is capable of 3D printing concrete and clay with high precision.

The concrete is printed in alternate layers by the robot head, moving in continuous oscillating waves which create the woven pattern. The benches form part of a collection of custom-made street furniture by Studio 7.5, which celebrates the design capabilities of emerging technologies.   

Woven concrete 3D printed benches. Photo via Studio 7.5.
Woven concrete 3D printed benches. Photo via Studio 7.5.

UCL students tackle the UAS Challenge 2018

Ogle Models, a UK-based prototyping firm, has partnered with a University College London (UCL) students to create a 3D printed aircraft model for the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Challenge 2018 in Llanbedr, Wales.

Organized by The Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE), the UAS Challenge tasks undergraduates with designing and building functional UAS to promote the development of aspiring engineers in aerospace.  

The UCL team designed a tailless, blended-wing-body aircraft made from carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer. Ogle Models created a prototype with 3D Systems’ Accura ClearVue resin which allowed for aerodynamic pressure tapping pathways on the model. This model went on to win three of eleven prizes in the competition including the “Most Promise Award.”

3D printed prototype of UCL's aircraft in ClearVue resin demonstrates the pressure tapping pathways. Photo via UCL.
3D printed prototype of UCL’s aircraft in ClearVue resin demonstrates the pressure tapping pathways. Photo via UCL.

Following a successful two-year collaboration, Oberg Industries, a manufacturer of precision machined or stamped metal components, and the University of Pittsburgh’s Swanson School of Engineering have agreed to extend their additive manufacturing research partnership to provide full-time employees in the Swanson School’s ANSYS Additive Manufacturing Research Laboratory (AMRL).

“Oberg was one of our first corporate partners in additive manufacturing and we are excited to continue this relationship,” said David Vorp, Associate Dean for Research, Swanson School of Engineering. “Our collaboration has enabled our faculty and students not only take full advantage of the AMRL capabilities but also have helped us attract outside funding.”

In other news, Creation Labs, a makerspace designed for 3D printing enthusiasts, has opened a pop-up lab at the South Hills Village, Pittsburgh offering memberships, 3D printing services, and training workshops for makers of all ages. Find out more about the makerspace here.

Inside Creation Labs' pop-up makerspace. Photo via Creation Labs.
Inside Creation Labs’ pop-up makerspace. Photo via Creation Labs.

Renishaw establishes new Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Center

Renishaw, a UK-based engineering firm, has opened their Additive Manufacturing Demonstration Center in Newbury Park, California, the headquarters of Ibex Engineering, a manufacturer of advanced motor and motion technologies. This center allows visitors to explore, interact with and use Renishaw’s latest metal additive manufacturing systems, such as the RenAM 500 series.

“It’s fantastic to be able to place a metal additive manufacturing production cell within Ibex,” said Stephen Anderson, AM Business Development Manager, Renishaw USA.

“Not only does it allow us to showcase our latest technologies, but partnering with Ibex provides us access to an expert manufacturer of precision staging equipment who will utilize the technology to develop innovative products, and drive metal AM into new markets and even wider adoption.”

The RenAM 500 3D printing systems. Photo via Renishaw.
The RenAM 500.Photo via Renishaw.

Similarly, Nanoscribe, a German company specializing in 3D printing at the micrometer scale, has established a subsidiary company at the ZEISS Innovation Center, Shanghai, China to accelerate sales activities in and business relationships across the APAC region.

Furthermore, Nano Dimension, an additive electronics provider based in Israel, has announced its new APAC subsidiary, Nano Dimension (HK) Limited, which will enter into a strategic cooperation agreement with Shandong Guohui Investment, a provincial platform company owned by the Shandong Province State-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC).

The Nanoscribe subsidiary in the facilities of Carl ZEISS AG, Shanghai. Photo via Nanoscribe.
The Nanoscribe subsidiary in the facilities of Carl ZEISS AG, Shanghai. Photo via Nanoscribe.

3D printing and business

Thor3D, the Russian manufacturers of the Drake wireless 3D scanner, has announced a shift in management as Anna Zevelyov as its first CEO, and Vadim Fomichev as new Sales Director.

“My first priority will be R&D (after all, Thor3D is, first and foremost, a technology company). My aim will be to significantly improve our current technology and to introduce a new 3D scanner at least once a year. Another priority will be organization of our intellectual property,” said Zevelyov.

Australia’s automotive collision repair network, AMA / Gemini Group, has joined Swinburne University of Technology’s $1.2 million (AUD) research project, Repair Bot which will spearhead the development of an automated, 3D printed repair service for cars.

Moreover, Sigma Labs, a Santa Fe, New Mexico-based software developer, has been awarded a contract for its PrintRite3D system from an undisclosed federally funded aerospace organization to streamline metal additive manufacturing.

“Our PrintRite3D system will be integrated into a Concept Laser M2 3D printing machine to provide the scientific framework necessary to avoid the trial-and-error approach to qualification, which is expensive, time-consuming and provides no assurance of achieving the desired product attributes,” said John Rice, Chairman and CEO of Sigma Labs.

“When adequately tested with empirical in-process data from our PrintRite3D system, national security space systems can be fabricated defect-free, with structurally sound and reliable components based on scientific principles.”

Scotland’s first Digital Heritage Festival

The Historic Environment Scotland (HES) has unveiled the programme for the country’s first digital heritage festival exploring the technologies such as 3D modeling, scanning, and printing. The DigiFest will take place from October 8-20th at the Engine Shed.

The DigiFest promotional flyer. Photo via The Engine Shed.
The DigiFest promotional flyer. Photo via The Engine Shed.

For of the latest research related to 3D printing sign up to the 3D Printing Industry newsletter, Also, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

On the lookout for new talent or seeking a career change? Search and post 3D Printing Jobs for opportunities and new talent across engineering, marketing, sales and more.

Featured image shows the Sliced logo over the woven concrete 3D printed benches. Photo via Studio 7.5.

HP partners with CDC to mental test and bioprint antibiotics

<![CDATA[

HP has proclaimed its engagement in the Centers for Disease power (generic term) and bar (CDC) airplane pilot programme that aims to develop new antibiotics designed to fighting antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. According to the CDC, a United States government health care organization, infective diseases with immune organisms caused by antibiotics are hard to treat, requiring costly and sometimes toxic alternatives. With HP’s … Continue reading “HP partners with CDC to mental mental test and bioprint antibiotics”

The station HP partners with CDC to mental mental test and bioprint antibiotics appeared first on 3dprinter.in.

]]>
source :http://www.3dprinter.in/feed/

MIT’s direct-write mixture (generic term) 3D writing (generic term) unlocks new possibilities in physics (generic term) and physical phenomenon (generic term)

<![CDATA[

Working on the nanoscale, MIT investigation (generic term)ers have 3D written centimeter-long structures that could alteration the human face of physics (generic term) and optical sensors. The know-how (generic term) relies on the self-assembly principles of mixture (generic term)s – particles between 1 nm and 1 μm wide. In the know-how (generic term), billions of polystyrene mixture (generic term)s electrical fuse together to build structures programmed by the investigation (generic term) team. … Continue reading “MIT’s direct-write mixture (generic term) 3D writing (generic term) unlocks new possibilities in physics (generic term) and energy”

The station MIT’s direct-write mixture (generic term) 3D writing (generic term) unlocks new possibilities in physics (generic term) and energy appeared archetypal on 3dprinter.in.

]]>
source :http://www.3dprinter.in/feed/

Consolidation in learned profession (related term) 3D writing (generic term) market, K2M noninheritable by Stryker in $1.4 cardinal trade

<![CDATA[

Virginia learned profession (related term) instrumentality (generic term) maker K2M is to be acquired by Michigan headquartered luck 500 learned profession (related term) engineering firm Stryker (NYSE:SYK). Both companies apply 3D writing (generic term) engineering to the production of skeletal structure (related term) implants. In the terms of the acquisition, K2M is to become a entirely closely-held subsidiary of Stryker at the aquisition price of $27.50 per share, generating a … Continue reading “Consolidation in learned profession (related term) 3D writing (generic term) market, K2M acquired by Stryker in $1.4 cardinal trade”

The station Consolidation in learned profession (related term) 3D writing (generic term) market, K2M acquired by Stryker in $1.4 cardinal trade appeared first on 3dprinter.in.

]]>
source :http://www.3dprinter.in/feed/