3D Printing Industry Review of the Year August 2018

The month of August welcomed various medical innovations within the 3D printing industry. The automotive and aerospace sector also further integrated additive manufacturing through Bugatti’s latest supercar, the Divo, and NASA’s cube satellite set for space from the Hindustan Institute of Technology and Sciences.

Moreover, Reebok and BASF  began production of its 3D printed sneaker, the Liquid speed.

Medical 3D printing innovations

In a proof-of-concept project, the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for military healthcare began applying 3D printing to develop artificial lungs. Upon developing 3D printed chips devices for organs, Dr. Joseph Potkay, a biomedical engineer at the VA Ann Arbor Health Care System, Michigan, said:

“The flexibility in design afforded by 3D printing gives us more freedom and thus the ease to build artificial lungs with a small size and pressure drops that are compatible for operation with the body’s natural pressures.”

Biomedical engineer Dr. Joseph Potkay, with the VA Ann Arbor Health Care System, displays a 2D prototype of an artificial lung. A 3D version is in production. Photo by Brian Hayes/VA
Biomedical engineer Dr. Joseph Potkay, with the VA Ann Arbor Health Care System, displays a 2D prototype of an artificial lung. A 3D version is in production. Photo by Brian Hayes/VA

In other news, the University of Sydney’s Save Sight Institute received a $1.15 million (AUD) grant from the New South Wales (NSW) Government’s Medical Devices Fund (MDF) to progress commercialization of its 3D corneal biopen.

Dubbed as the “iFix Pen”, the hand-held co-axial 3D printer is capable of extruding bioink directly onto an eye to aid in the regeneration of cells on corneal ulcers. The pen also creates a biological barrier towards ongoing cornea damage caused by infections.

The BioPen, developed by researchers from the UOW-headquartered Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES), will give surgeons greater control over where the materials are deposited while also reducing the time the patient is in surgery by delivering live cells and growth factors directly to the site of injury, accelerating the regeneration of functional bone and cartilage. Photo shows Dr. Stephen Beirne of the Australian National Fabrication Facility with the bio pen.
Dr. Stephen Beirne of the Australian National Fabrication Facility and UOW with the iFix Pen. Photo via Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science (ACES).

Similarly, the McAlpine Research Group from the University of Minnesota (UMN) successfully 3D printed optoelectronic devices using polymer photodetectors on hemispherical surfaces. This development was marked as a significant step towards “bionic eyes” to aid the visually impaired.

The 3D printed optoelectronic "bionic eye" device. Photo via UMN/McAlpine Group.
The 3D printed optoelectronic “bionic eye” device. Photo via UMN/McAlpine Group.

Investments and aerospace

Within business, the city of Querétaro, Mexico, became the host of the first Additive Manufacturing Consortium (Conmad) in Latin America. Investing over $13 million, the Conmad includes Cinvestav, Mexico’s National Center for Research and Advanced Studies, CIATEQ an Advanced Technology Center, and CIDESI, a Center for Engineering and Industrial Development.

The main aim of Conmad is to validate and explore viable 3D printing technology for production to implement new additive manufacturing infrastructure in North-Central Mexico.

Additionally, Digital Alloys, a Boston based developer of metal 3D printers, received a $12.9 million investment during a series B financing including G20 Ventures, Boeing HorizonX Ventures, Lincoln Electric, and Khosla VenturesThis financing is being used to develop Digital Alloys’ new metal additive manufacturing approach called Joule Printing.

Joule Printing allows additive manufacturing of metal components. Photo via Digital Alloys.
Joule Printing allows additive manufacturing of metal components. Photo via Digital Alloys.

Developing one of the lightest satellites in the world, Indian 3D printer manufacturer 3Ding, and students at the Hindustan Institute of Technology and Sciences, created a 3D printed a cube satellite set for launch on a NASA Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Fort Sumner, New Mexico.

Known as Jai Hind 1-S, the cube, weighing 33.3 grams, was crafted as a submission for Cubes in Space, a free, global competition for students ages 11-18.

The Jai Hind 1-S. Photo via 3Ding
The Jai Hind 1-S. Photo via 3Ding.

The Liquid Factory

Causing excitement in both the 3D printing and fashion industry, Reebok and its materials provider BASF released details about its Liquid Factory sneaker 3D printing technology. Acting as a step towards production, Reebok opened a Rhode Island facility where 3D printed shoes will be made.

The white model of Reebok’s new “Liquid Speed” branded shoe. Photo via Reebok.

The Bugatti Divo

Also drawing attention to the capabilities of additive manufacturing at the Quail, A Motorsports Gathering.was the Bugatti Divo. With a price tag of €5 million, the Bugatti Divo supercar displayed 3D printed fin taillights, which were designed for optimum handling performance on winding roads.

“The Divo is a further example of our design philosophy ‘Form follows Performance‘. In this case, the engineers and designers aimed to create a vehicle focusing on cornering speeds and lateral dynamics,” said Achim Anscheidt, Director of Design at Bugatti.

The Bugatti Divo. Photo via Bugatti.
The Bugatti Divo. Photo via Bugatti.

Facebook’s stance on 3D printed guns

Contributing to the debate over 3D printed guns, social media giant Facebook became the latest organization to weigh in on the discussion in an update to its Community Guidelines. The platform stated: “Sharing instructions on how to print firearms using 3D printers is not allowed under our Community Standards,” much to Cody Wilson’s dismay.

The Plastic Liberator 3D printed gun. Photo by Lorenza Baroncelli
Banned from Facebook: The Plastic Liberator 3D printed gun. Photo by Lorenza Baroncelli.

Finally, in hardware developments, Aleph Objects, the Colorado-based manufacturer of the LulzBot range of desktop 3D Printers, unveiled a new, high-precision tool head at SIGGRAPH 2018 in Vancouver –  the LulzBot Aerostruder v2 Micro.

A penny-sized octopus printed using the new Aerostruder v2 Micro Tool Head. Photo via Aleph Objects.
A penny-sized octopus printed using the new Aerostruder v2 Micro Tool Head. Photo via Aleph Objects.

Who made the best contribution to the 3D printing industry? Make your nominations now for the 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019.

Also, for the latest 3D Printing Industry news throughout 2019  subscribe to our newsletter, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start in the new year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to get a head start.

Featured image shows the Bugatti Divo, complete with 3D printed taillights. 

3D Printing Industry Review of the Year September 2018

The month of September met a variety of additive manufacturing shows such as IMTS, TCT, as well as New Scientist Live. The 3D printing industry also saw many technological advancements aiming to accelerate industrial metal additive manufacturing.

This includes EOS’s M300 series of direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) 3D printers and 3D Systems and GF Machining Solutions’, DMP Factory 500.

IMTS and the industrialization of 3D printing

3D Printing Industry returned to Chicago for the 2018 edition of IMTS. There, additive experts, such as Bertrand Humel van der Lee, the Chief Customer Operations Officer (CCOO) at EOS, discussed the increasing interest in industrial 3D printing.

“There was almost immediate commercial interest in our EOS M 300 system, which we launched at the show. Overall, as production moves to more customized, shorter-term product cycles, the manufacturers we’re working with are finding immediate value in bringing in more machines.”

Also at IMTS, 3D Systems and GF Machining Solutions, unveiled the DMP Factory 500, an industrial, automated metal 3D printing system for high-quality, large part production.

EOS M 300 series metal 3D printers. Image via EOS
EOS M 300 series metal 3D printers. Image via EOS.

In other news, with the aim of creating a complete production cell for additive manufacturing aluminum components, the NextGenAM project established its first pilot plant in Varel, Northern Germany.

In addition, metal additive manufacturing materials producer Metalysis entered into industrial-scale production of its metal powders. As a result, the company’s plant is capable of producing in the region of 10,000 – 100,000 kg+ (10s to 100s of tonnes) of metal powders.

Similarly, Aurora Labs, a metal 3D printer manufacturer based in Australia, positioned itself at the forefront of metal 3D printing technology, with the ongoing development of its latest system, the large-format Alpha 3D printer.

The Alpha 3D printer. Photo via Aurora Labs.
The Alpha 3D printer. Photo via Aurora Labs.

Birmingham’s TCT SHOW

3D Printing Industry also returned to the TCT Show in Birmingham this September. The show displayed a number of desktop 3D printers for high-quality FFF additive manufacturing as well as multi-material 3D micro-fabrication. This included Swiss 3D TEC, DM3 printer, Raise3D’s  Pro2 series of 3D printers, and BMF Material Technology’s the nanoArch S140 PμLSE 3D printer.

Inside the 2018 TCT Show at the NEC. Photo by Tia Vialva.
Inside the 2018 TCT Show at the NEC. Photo by Tia Vialva.

New Scientist Live

Observing the medical applications of additive manufacturing, 3D Printing Industry attended New Scientist Live (NSL) 2018 in London. At the event, Professor Leroy “Lee” Cronin, the Regius Chair of Chemistry at the University of Glasgow, described how his team is using 3D printed parts for chemical computers.

“The 3D printed parts are used as the containers for chemical reactions and act as holders to make the cellular array. These help us to reconfigure different shapes.”

Professor Kai Bongs at NSL 2018. Photo by Swamini.
Professor Kai Bongs at NSL 2018. Photo by Swamini Khanvilkar.

A 3D printing curriculum

In education, PrintLab, a UK based 3D printing reseller, announced the launch of additional language options for its PrintLab Classroom learning program. The first new language are now available in Polish, Spanish and Chinese. The Polish version was done in collaboration with Polish 3D Technology & Education supplier, Paxer.

Moreover, the Australian government, in partnership with 3D printing bureau and reseller, Objective 3D, announced $2 million (AUD) in funding for a new additive manufacturing (AM) virtual hub.

What 3D printing companies and stakeholders deserve a 3D Printing Industry Award? Make your nominations now for 2019.

For the latest 3D Printing Industry news subscribe to our newsletter (it’s free!), follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start in the new year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to get a head start.

Featured image shows the exterior of IMTS 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

3D writing (generic term) commercial enterprise (generic term) reappraisal of the twelvemonth grand 2018

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The month of grand welcomed various medical innovations inside the 3D printing industry. The motor vehicle and region (generic term) plane figure (generic term) besides farther integrated accumulative manufacturing done Bugatti’s latest supercar, the Divo, and NASA’s block outer set for infinite from the Hindustan Institute of engineering and Sciences. Moreover, Reebok and BASF  began industry (generic term) of its 3D written sneaker, … Continue reading “3D Printing commercial enterprise (generic term) Review of the twelvemonth grand 2018”

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3D writing (generic term) commercial enterprise (generic term) reappraisal of the twelvemonth September 2018

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3D Printing Industry Review of the Year June 2018

Moving on to June 2018 – 3D printing strengthened its position in the automotive industry and we took on the Ocean’s 8 diamond heist.

Within the 3D printing trifecta, materials started to take on a hold, and would continue to trend throughout trade shows and product announcements in the latter half of the year.

Soft and metal-multimaterial 3D printing 

In terms of social media shares, one of the the most popular 3D Printing Industry articles for June 2018 was a write-up of a Washington State University Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS) project. By experimenting with this technique from Optomec, a group in the WSU School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering succeeded in 3D printing multimaterial metal components joining copper with superalloy Inconel 718.

Staying with the materials trend, Carnegie Mellon University‘s materials characterization algorithm also proved popular this month. Named “Expert-Guided Optimization,” this method from the CMU College of Engineering is capable of calculating the perfect parameters for 3D printing soft materials like hydrogels.

Objects 3D printed using the EGO method. Each object is shown in standard PLA (left), epoxy, (center) and PDMS (right). Image via PLOS One Journal/CMU
Objects 3D printed using the CMU EGO method. Each object is shown in standard PLA (left), epoxy, (center) and PDMS (right). Image via PLOS One Journal/CMU

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers also developed its own 3D printable concrete formulation in June.

Medical modeling on demand

In medical, 3D Systems launched its On Demand Anatomical Modeling Service to fulfill a growing demand within the industry.

And San Francisco biotechnology company Prellis Biologics reached record speed in tissue fabrication using its holographic 3D printing method to make a capillary-like structure.

Music to our ears

Through a collaboration between Canadian violin maker, Charline Dequincey, additive manufacturing network Canada Makes, and Winnipeg’s Industrial Technology Centre, the Ottawa Symphony Orchestra commissioned the production of eight functional 3D printed instruments.

The four 3D printed violins, two violas and two violoncello da spallas, were played at a public event on 4 November 2018.

3D printed prototype of a violin. Photo via Ottawa Symphony Orchestra.
3D printed prototype of a violin. Photo via Ottawa Symphony Orchestra.

And, to mark the release of the “blockbuster” Ocean’s 8 film (which gained a “lukewarm” response from critics, potentially due to its questionable application of technology) we challenged several industry experts to to replicate a diamond necklace using consumer-grade 3D printing and scanning technology.

Secrets from additive manufacturing in automotive 

As an often reserved industry, automotive additive manufacturing announcements usually make waves across the industry. This month, the Lansing Delta Township assembly plant of American multinational vehicle manufacturer General Motors shared a $300,000 cost saving due to 3D printed tooling.

In the same vein, the Audi Pre-Series Center in Ingolstadt, Germany, announced that it would be switching to the Stratasys J750 for its prototyping needs.

And finally, an electric vehicle development venture between We Solutions, and Shanghai Alliance Investment announced that Divergent 3D node-based additive manufacturing technology would form a central role in a new car production plant.

The Divergent3D Blade at SLM Solutions booth. Photo by Michael Petch.
The Divergent3D Blade at SLM Solutions booth. Photo by Michael Petch.

Think these applications, 3D printing companies and stakeholders warrant a 3D Pritning Industry Award? Make your nominations now for 2019. 

For 3D Printing Industry updates throughout 2019 and beyond subscribe to our newsletter (it’s free!), follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start in the new year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to get a head start.

Featured image shows 3D printing a capillary structure using Prellis Biologics’ holographic technology. Clip via Prellis Biologics.

3D Printing Industry Review of the Year July 2018

The month of July saw a plethora of partnerships and announcements from the Farnborough International Airshow as well as an abundance of funding for 3D printing startups in New Zealand.

Furthermore, the 3D printing industry welcomed a new range of filaments from Amazon, while observing the legal battle between Cody Wilson’s open-source 3D printed firearm file sharing site Defense Distributed and the U.S. government.

The Farnborough International Airshow

Located in Hampshire, UK, the biennial Farnborough International Airshow became the hub for partnerships aimed towards the advancement of industrial 3D printing in aerospace. Among the announcements is GE Additive, who launched a Manufacturing Partner Network (MPN). With initial partners including Burloak Technologies, Carpenter Co, and Proto Labs, the MPN strives to meet the increasing demand of 3D printed components.

Furthermore, Norsk Titanium, an aerospace additive manufacturing company, in collaboration with The University of Notre Dame Turbomachinery Laboratory (NDTL), and Pratt & Whitney, created, tested, and displayed the first additive manufactured integrally bladed rotor (IBR) used within turbine engines.

The Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan PW1000G aircraft engine, complete with additively manufactured components. Photo via Tia Vialva.
The Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan PW1000G aircraft engine, complete with additively manufactured components at the Farnborough Airshow. Photo via Tia Vialva.

Committing to industrial 3D printing

In business, Ricoh, a Japanese multinational imaging and electronics company, demonstrated its commitment to industrial 3D printing. Joji Tokunaga, president & CEO, confirmed a $1.8 billion budget for mergers and acquisitions for additive manufacturing and more.

In New Zealand, the Entrepreneurial Universities programme received a $10 million (NZD) boost from the Government and University of Auckland (UoA) to support 3D printing startups. Such funding has already helped to develop a 3D printed rocket motor from Kiwi startup Rocket Lab.

Additionally, Xometry, an on-demand manufacturing platform based in Maryland, acquired fellow manufacturing platform based in Kentucky, MakeTime, as well as a new funding round of $25 million.

Observing the investments in the market, Amazon launched its own brand of 3D printer filaments, AmazonBasics, which was tested and reviewed by our engineers.

AmazonBasics 3D printer filament. Photo via Amazon.

“Low sales led to hard decisions”

Despite the significant contributions to additive manufacturing, the 3D printing community was saddened by the closure of Open source 3D printer manufacturer Printrbot. Brook Drumm, founder of the company stated: citing poor sales as the reason for the decision. A simple statement on the Printrbot website from founder stated:

“Printrbot is closed. Low sales led to hard decisions. We will be forever grateful to all the people we met and served over the years. Thank you all.”

Brook Drumm and some early 3D printers. Photo via Printrbot.
Brook Drumm and some early 3D printers. Photo via Printrbot.

In other news, Sinterit, a Poland-based manufacturer of Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) 3D printers, revealed the LISA 1.5, a new generation of the market’s first affordable desktop SLS 3D printer – the LISA 1. This launch came two months after the release of the LISA 2, the desktop SLS 3D printer for industrial applications.

The LISA 1.5 SLS 3D printer. Image via Sinterit.
The LISA 1.5 SLS 3D printer. Image via Sinterit.

Trade wars and additive manufacturing

The beginning of July marked the start of U.S. trade tariffs on goods valued at $34 billion worth of imports from China. Considering the impact on additive manufacturing, Avi Reichental, Vice Chairman of DWS, told 3D Printing Industry:

“I think that China is a very important 3D printing marketplace – both as a supplier of increasing importance and for their strategic contributions. China is one of the countries that has invested the most in 3D printing in the last five years.”

“Industries like 3D printing and additive manufacturing thrive on the free and open trade of goods across borders and continents. We only have to remind ourselves that the best ideas and products might not come from our own backyard.”

The U.S Air Force’s Hot Cups

Home to the largest air mobility wing in the U.S. Air Force, the Travis Air Force Base in California used 3D printing to develop a cost-effective solution for replaceable handles on military-grade thermoses.

The original hot cup plastic handle. Photo via U.S. Air Force/Courtesy of Tech. Sgt. James Hodgman.
The original hot cup plastic handle. Photo via U.S. Air Force/Courtesy of Tech. Sgt. James Hodgman.

Lifting the 3D printed gun ban

Moreover, in a decision that caused upheaval, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) and U.S. Department of State (DOS) lifted the ban on Cody Wilson’s open-source 3D printed firearm file sharing site, Defense Distributed, which halted the distribution of 3D models of guns.

Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson holds the 3D printed Plastic Liberator. Photo by Lorenza Baroncelli
Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson holds the 3D printed Plastic Liberator. Photo by Lorenza Baroncelli.

Who made the best contribution to the 3D printing industry? Make your nominations now for the 3D Printing Industry Awards 2019.

Also, for 3D Printing Industry updates throughout 2019 and beyond subscribe to our newsletter, follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start in the new year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to get a head start.

Featured image shows the Pratt & Whitney Geared Turbofan PW1000G aircraft engine, complete with additively manufactured components at Farnborough Airshow. Photo via Tia Vialva.

3D writing (generic term) commercial enterprise (generic term) reappraisal of the twelvemonth June 2018

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Moving on to June 2018 – 3D writing (generic term) reinforced its place in the motor vehicle industry and we took on the Ocean’s 8 jewel (generic term) heist. inside the 3D writing (generic term) trifecta, materials started to take on a hold, and would continue to tendency end-to-end commerce (generic term) shows and product announcements in the last mentioned fractional of the year. brushed … Continue linguistic process (generic term) “3D writing (generic term) commercial enterprise (generic term) reappraisal of the twelvemonth June 2018”

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3D writing (generic term) commercial enterprise (generic term) reappraisal of the twelvemonth July 2018

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The calendar month of July saw a overplus of partnerships and announcements from the Farnborough global Airshow as well as an copiousness of funding for 3D writing (generic term) startups in New Zealand. Furthermore, the 3D writing (generic term) industry welcomed a new range of filaments from Amazon, piece observing the legal conflict betwixt Cody Wilson’s open-source 3D printed piece … Continue linguistic process (generic term) “3D writing (generic term) commercial enterprise (generic term) reappraisal of the twelvemonth July 2018”

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3D Printing Industry Review of the Year April 2018

In April 2018, automotive and architecture dominated on the 3D printing applications front.

This month, 3D Printing Industry also became an official media partner of AMUG, one of the most exclusive groups in the industry – and we featured big releases from the likes of Stratasys, BMW, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Markforged.

3D Printing Industry as media partner of AMUG

As official partner of the 2018 Additive Manufacturing User Group (AMUG) event in St. Louis, 3D Printing Industry was privileged to get the inside track on the latest tips tricks, and industry trends from the show floor. Speaking with exhibitors including ANSYS, Renishaw and Carbon, our Editor in Chief Michael Petch also gathered some exclusive insights into expectations for the year.

In 2019, 3D Printing Industry is to renew its media partnership with AMUG for a second year, and will continue to provide exclusive insights from the show.

30 years celebrated at AMUG 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.
30 years celebrated at AMUG 2018. Photo by Michael Petch.

BMW’s multimillion investment in additive

In business, demonstrating its commitment to the technology, BMW invested €10 million its Additive Manufacturing Campus, which is set to open in the coming year. Later the same week, the company showcased some of its capabilities in the 3D printed BMW S1000RR chassis, which went on to become one of the most shared articles of the month.

Detail of the BMW S1000RR 3D printed chassis. Photo via Visor Down
Detail of the BMW S1000RR 3D printed chassis. Photo via Visor Down

Feeding into an undercurrent that ran through many of this year’s trade shows, software also proved to be a popular topic this month. In particular, our review of software simulation, for metal deformation at the UK’s Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC), and the development of dddrop 3D printers, became a well circulated article.

Evolve Additive Solutions, the company behind the new Selective Toner Electrophotographic Process (STEP) 3D printing, exited stealth-mode, and Stratasys launched PBF spinoff Vulcan Labs.

the U.S. Navy also announced its commitment to rely on 1,000 3D printed parts by the end of the year.

The jury’s still out though on whether this was achieved or not.

Going large with thermosets and architecture 

In large scale 3D printing, Magnum Venus Products provided Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the means of processing new thermoset materials.

And EDG, a New York city based architectural design studio, revealed how it had been using 3D printing to restore classic building facades.

Render of a facade produced with 3D printing. Image via EDG.
Render of a facade produced with 3D printing. Image via EDG.

Markforged starts shipping Metal X

In terms of 3D printer launches this year, Bostonian manufacturer Markforged commenced shipping of its Metal X 3D printer. First announced over a year prior at CES 2017, this shipment was tipped to be “the first of many” for the company throughout 2018.

Sample parts made on the Markforged Metal X 3D printer. Photo via Markforged.
Sample parts made on the Markforged Metal X 3D printer. Photo via Markforged.

Think these applications, 3D printing companies and stakeholders warrant a 3D Pritning Industry Award? Make your nominations now for 2019. 

For 3D Printing Industry updates throughout 2019 and beyond subscribe to our newsletter (it’s free!), follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start in the new year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to get a head start.

Featured image shows BMW’s 3D printed S1000RR chassis. Photo via Visor Down

3D Printing Industry Review of the Year May 2018

3D printing in May 2018 saw the launch of our second annual 3D Printing Industry Awards (2019 nominations now open) and marked the 10th Anniversary of the RepRap movement.

In applications, some of the most popular articles included medical breakthroughs. We were also given the exclusive opportunity to see the latest machines coming to market.

Guests at the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards.
Guests at the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards.

Return of the annual 3D Printing Industry Awards

Returning for its second year, the 3D Printing Industry Awards dinner in London hosted over 150 guests from more than 60 companies across the industry. For the first time too, the awards ceremony was live streamed on YouTube via the Make Anything channel.

This year’s winners included Volkswagen Autoeuropa and Ultimaker, for Automotive Application of the Year; Protolabs, the Creative use of 3D Printing; and chemical giant BASF, Material Company of the Year.

Fried Vancraen, Founder & CEO Materialise, won the Outstanding Contribution to 3D Printing award.

Fried Vancraen, Materialise founder and CEO at the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards. Photo by Michael Petch.
Fried Vancraen, Materialise founder and CEO at the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards. Photo by Michael Petch.

In this month, we also announced that we would be on the jury for the Formnext 2018 Start-up Challenge, which saw five innovative hopefuls exhibit at the show for the first time in the following November.

RepRapIs10

Our celebration of the 10th Anniversary of RepRap kicked off with a guest article from the inventor himself, Dr. Adrian Bowyer. Following Dr. Bowyer, we also received contributions from Vik Olliver, the first RepRap volunteer, and Ed Sells, the PhD student who helped build the first Mendel 3D printer.

Adrian Bowyer drinks to the success of the first Darwin RepRap 3D printer from a 3D printed shot glass. Photo via Adrian Bowyer
Adrian Bowyer drinks to the success of the first Darwin RepRap 3D printer from a 3D printed shot glass. Photo via Adrian Bowyer

The month of 3D printed corneas, airless tires and microgravity fabrication

In terms of applications this month, medical received a significant contribution. At Newcastle University researchers 3D printed the first human corneas; Stratasys medical models helped save the life of 2 year old child at Guy’s and St. Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust in the UK; and Limbitless Solutions, Florida, began a clinical trial of 3D printed bionic arms.

Elsewhere, BigRep’s airless bicycle tire made its debut; NASA green lighted a Made in Space metal 3D printer; and the European Space Agency (ESA) received a prototype high temperature polymer 3D printer.

3D printed Cornea
Dr. Stephen Swioklo, holding 3D printed cornea with Professor Che Connon (right). Photo via Newcastle University.

New 3D printers

In terms of hardware releases, we were invited to Poland to preview the new Lisa Pro SLS 3D printer from Sinterit.

And, following on from April’s preview at Rapid + TCT 2018, we witnessed the launch of Titan Roboticslarge scale pellet extrusion 3D printer.

The Titan Robotics Enclosed Atlas with Pellet Extrusion at RAPID + TCT 2018. Photo by Beau Jackson
The Titan Robotics Enclosed Atlas with Pellet Extrusion at RAPID + TCT 2018. Photo by Beau Jackson

Next up for our Year in Review series we have (surprise surprise) June 2018! But, in the meantime, place your nominations for the 2019 3D Printing Industry Awards and help decide the next 3D Printer of the Year, OEM of the Year and more.

If you’d like to join us for the 2019 3D Printing Industry Awards you can also contact us about ticket sales.

For 3D Printing Industry updates throughout 2019 and beyond subscribe to our newsletter (it’s free!), follow us on Twitter and like us on Facebook.

Looking for a fresh start in the new year? Visit 3D Printing Jobs to get a head start.

Feature image shows Siert Wijnia, CTO and Co-Founder at Ultimaker collecting the 2018 3D Printing Industry Award for Automotive Application of the Year.