Honeywell approves Sintavia to 3D print metal aerospace components

Metal additive manufacturing company Sintavia has announced that it has
been approved to manufacture components for Honeywell Aerospace
using powder bed fusion, becoming the first Tier One additive
manufacturer to occupy such a role. 

Honeywell Aerospace, which has previously
entered into 3D printing R&D contracts with
Sigma Labs
and
3D Systems
, granted Sintavia
approval following an 18-month qualification process.

Airborne parts for Honeywell
Aerospace

The approval covers all programs within
Honeywell
Aerospace
, meaning that Sintavia may now produce Honeywell
parts for application in airlines, general aviation,
spacecraft, and defence.

Such parts include gas turbine auxiliary power
units (APUs), turboshaft engines, turbofan engines,
and engine control valves, all of
which contain extensive metal components and may now be 3D
printed using Sintavia’s powder bed fusion process.

As seen in similar aerospace engineering
projects such as GE’s
3D printed Black Hawk Turboshaft engine
, additive
manufacturing has enabled shorter lead times, greater
customization, more complex geometries, less material waste and
greater energy efficiency.

A TPE331 APU, the sort of aerospace component that would benefit from additive manufacturing. Photo via Honeywell Aerospace.A TPE331 APU, the sort
of aerospace component that would benefit from additive
manufacturing. Photo via Honeywell Aerospace.

Sintavia’s hard work pays off

Sintavia received
$15 million in equity financing
in 2017 to be
invested into an
under-construction advanced manufacturing
facility
in Hollywood, Florida that specializes in
metal additive manufacturing.

This will see the company expand upon its current portfolio of
seven powder bed fusion 3D printers, which manufacture parts by
focusing a laser on to a powder bed of Nickel, Titanium, or
Aluminum alloys.

“We have been working with Honeywell for over 18 months as
part of their rigorous supplier qualification,”

“We are grateful that all of our team’s hard
work has paid off, and are looking forward to demonstrating the
many benefits of additive manufacturing within Honeywell’s
supply chain in the form of lower costs, shorter manufacturing
times, and dramatic design improvements,” said Brian R. Neff,
Sintavia’s Chairman and CEO.

Honeywell Safety lab engineers at a facility in Redmond, Washington. They will test 3D printed metal parts before certification. Photo via Honeywell Aerospace.Honeywell Safety lab
engineers at a facility in Redmond, Washington. They will test 3D
printed metal parts before certification. Photo via Honeywell
Aerospace.

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Featured image shows a Honeywell Aerospace test flight at
the Paris Air Show. Photo via Honeywell Aerospace.

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