3D printing news Sliced Reebok, Carbon, Stratasys, GE Additive, 3D Systems and Shakespeare

How much does it cost to 3D print a metal faucet? What is CFAM?
Can you 3D print PEEK on a desktop?

In today’s edition of Sliced, 3D Printing Industry’s news
digest, we report the latest stories from Stratasys, GE
Additive, 3D Systems, the Royal Shakespeare Company, Arconic,
Carbon and more.

High-end luxury and fighting crime

Dutch clay 3D printer provider VormVrij 3D completed a
challenge to make 400 identical ceramic cups in just 2 weeks.
Using the company’s LUTUM 3D printers, a total of 1,200 cups
were made over a 6 week period, fulfilling an order for
an Audi A8 Timeshift event.

A boxed cup made by VormVrij. Photo via VormVrij/UnfoldA boxed cup made by
VormVrij. Photo via VormVrij/Unfold

In a novel spare part initiative, 3D service bureau Visual First are using Stratasys polymer 3D
printers to replace metal parts of machines at The Chocolate
Factory in Rotterdam. According to Carl van de Rijzen, Visual
First Business Owner, “We can 3D print and deliver production
parts to The Chocolate Factory in under a week, which is vital
to ensuring manufacturing line continuity.”

On invitation from Reebok, London design agency Modla has combined new
Flexweave material technology with 3D printing to make a
stylish altitude training mask.

The props department at Stratford-upon-Avon’s Royal Shakespeare
Company (RSC) has been using 3D printers to help solve setting
problems in the UK. “Making is having a huge renaissance. When
CGI first came in, along with 3D printing, there was a sense
that it was a death knell,” says Alan Fell acting head of RSC’s
props department in
an interview for The Guardian,

“But the budgetary costs of CGI are enormous – sometimes it
makes more sense to make things. Similarly, 3D printing does
the basic, boring bits – and allows us to immerse ourselves
in cerebral, fun problem-solving.”

British Colombia’s Royal Canadian Mounted Police (BC RCMP) has
issued a government tender for its own 3D printer to help
recreate crime scenes for the courtroom.

And, the “first of its kind” faucet pictured below has been 3D
printed on a ProX® DMP 320 metal additive machine from 3D
Systems. Indianapolis direct metal printing specialist 3rd Dimension made the tap for
luxury kitchen and bathroom fixtures design brand KALLISTA, whose products have a
price tag typically within the thousands of dollars.

The 3D printed GRID faucet by Kallista. Photo via 3D SystemsThe 3D printed GRID
faucet by Kallista. Photo via 3D Systems

Hot hardware

A preview of SpiderBot’s ABSolute3
reveals that the desktop machine will be capable of 3D printing
materials melted at up to 220°C, putting it in line for
production using high-performance plastics such as
PolyEtherImide, PEEK, PEKK and PEEKK.

After
a smash hit on Kickstarter back in 2016
, UNIZ has started

a new campaign
to fund  the SLASH OL and SLTV Series
of 3D printers that reportedly set a new world record of 3D
printing speed to over 700mm/hr z-axis speed.”

Previewed
at CES 2017 this time last year
, the Bellus3D camera and
scanner for mobile devices are now available for pre-order, and
in limited quantities to potential resellers.

And the CEAD Group,
founded by two
co-founders of Leapfrog
, has started circulating images of
its forthcoming, large-scale Continuous Fibre Additive
Manufacturing (CFAM) machine. The system is tipped to have a
max build volume of 4 x 2 x 1.5 m, and be capable of
depositing up to 15 kg of material per hour.

CEAD Group's CFAM machine. Image via CEADCEAD Group’s CFAM
machine. Image via CEAD

Software troubleshooting 

3D printing software and solutions provider trinckle has
partnered with PROTIQ Marketplace to develop a web-based
configurator where customers can order metal 3D printed copper
inductors. A tricky task, from both a design and
a manufacturing point-of-view
, the platform makes it simple
to produce application-specific inductors on-demand.

The trickle powered PROTIQ Marketplace for 3D printed copper inductors. Image via trinckleThe trinckle
powered PROTIQ Marketplace for 3D printed copper inductors. Image
via trinckle

3dprintapps.de has
released two major updates its GCodePrintr and GCodeSimulator
apps on Android. The new version 3.0 comes with dual extrusion
support, a number of user interface improvements and many more
features to make 3D printing from mobile easier than before.

In addition to voice control for its color 3D printers,
XYZprinting has upgraded its hardware with a new feature that
protects prints in the event of a power outage.

XYZ introduces Resuming Printing feature with the help of a Captain America owl. Image via XYZprintingXYZ introduces
Resuming Printing feature with the help of a Captain America owl.
Image via XYZprinting

GE Additive shakeup and Carbon’s latest news

Arconic is expanding its existing advanced manufacturing
aerospace operations in Whitehall, MI with an investment
of $10 million. The investment is bolstered by the listing
of 38 new jobs at the Whitehall facility now listed on the
company’s website.

Mohammad Ehteshami is stepping down from his role as CEO of GE
Additive to a new advisory role within the company. Stepping up
to take his place is Jason Oliver, joining GE from a position
at American conglomerate manufacturer Dover Corporation.

3D Printing Industry EIC Michael Petch stands beside Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President and General Manager of GE Additive, holding the winning 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy for Financier of the Year 2017. Photo by Beau Jackson3D Printing
Industry EIC Michael Petch stands beside Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice
President and General Manager of GE Additive, holding the winning
3D Printing Industry Awards trophy for Financier of the Year
2017. Photo by Beau Jackson

Johnson & Johnson Innovation (JJDC, Inc.) has joined the
team of investors contributing $200
million to Carbon’s latest round of funding.
 In more
recent news from the company, Carbon has also partnered with
Ramaco
Carbon
to make coal-based 3D printed products.

Roboze, provider of the Roboze One, Roboze One 400+ and the
Argo 500 3D printers, has officially launched sales in
Germany and expanded its network in Scandinavia and Turkey.

The University of
Connecticut’
s (UConn) Additive Manufacturing Center
has installed a Gleeble 3500 System to aid in
the testing of new materials.

And D2M
Solutions
, a 3D printing service bureau located in Dubai,
will be bringing sales of Desktop
Metal systems
 to the Middle East.

A face for 3D printing in medicine

The Regenerative Medicine Manufacturing
Society
 is to have it inaugural meeting on Friday the
26th January. Dr. Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest
Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) that performs

cutting-edge work in the field of 3D bioprinting
, is one of
the society’s founding members.

The WFIRM 3D bioprinted Body on a Chip system containing heart, lung and liver cells. Photo via WFIRMWFIRM’s 3D
bioprinted Body on a Chip system containing heart, lung and liver
cells. Photo via WFIRM

Medical technology firm axial3D, based in Belfast,
Northern Ireland, has established a Scientific Advisory Board
for medical 3D printing software. Daniel Crawford, Founder
and CEO of axial3D, comments, “We look forward to working with
these individuals and leveraging their guidance to further
axial3D’s execution of our vision – making 3D printing routine
in hospitals.”

Hyper-realistic, 3D printed masks from NYU Langone Medical
Center
 have been made in attempt to encourage more
people to donate their faces for transplantation.

CEDARVILLE Engineering
Group
 and Rockland
Immunochemicals
are to collaborate on a “3D Bioprinting
Discovery Project.”

Bonus .stls

A wave lamp, originally created by Thingiverse
user Markellov has
been turned into a weather-predicting instructable by British
designer Dushyant
Ahuja.
 So, if you were looking for a new project to
get stuck into, this might be it.

Dushyant Ahuja’s complete weather reporting lamp. Clip
via Dushyant
Ahuja
 on YouTube


Nominate the best applications 
in
the second annual 3D Printing Industry Awards here.

Subscribe to the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
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 here.

Featured image shows the Sliced logo of 3D printed clay
pots made by VormVrij for Unfold. Origial photo via 3D Clay
Printing

The Best 3D printers of 2018? 3D Printing Industry Awards nominations update

The 3D Printing Industry Awards 2018 are once again
bringing out the community votes.

Although less than a month into the process, already
we’ve received well over 2,000 nominations for the best 3D
printers, breakthrough 3D printing applications, 3D printing
materials and software driving the industry forward.

You can make your nominations for the
2018 3D Printing Industry Awards
by
following the link.

The 2017 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy was made using metal filament from The Virtual Foundry.The 2017 3D Printing
Industry Awards trophy was made using metal filament from The
Virtual Foundry.

While this is not a full list all the nominations to
date, the data does make for interesting reading.

3D printing start-up of the year

So far nominations for this category include:

Additive Manufacturing Technologies

Ai Build

Authentise Inc

Cubicon

Dimension Inx

Glaze Prosthetics

Prellis Biologics

XtreeE

Desktop Metal's Tuan TranPham and 3D Printing Industry's Michael Petch at formnext 2017.Desktop Metal’s Tuan
TranPham and 3D Printing Industry’s Michael Petch at formnext
2017.

3D Printing Community Advocate or Teacher of the year

Agustin Flowalistik

3D Printing Nerd AKA Joel Telling

Thomas Sanladerer

Lauralyn McDaniel (SME MMI)

Makersmuse

Earl Miller from the Wanhao Duplicator 7 Facebook
group

Aerospace or Automotive application

GE ATP


Airbus A350 XWB pylon with bracket


iGEM Calgary Astro-plastic

NASA In-Space Manufacturing Project

3D Printing Industry EIC Michael Petch stands beside Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice President and General Manager of GE Additive, holding the winning 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy for Financier of the Year 2017. Photo by Beau Jackson3D Printing Industry
EIC Michael Petch stands beside Mohammad Ehteshami, Vice
President and General Manager of GE Additive, holding the winning
3D Printing Industry Awards trophy for Financier of the Year
2017. Photo by Beau Jackson

Medical, dental or healthcare application

E-Nable Low-Cost 3D Printed Prosthetics

EnvisionTEC E-IDB for indirect bonding trays

Glaze Prosthetics


Hyperelastic “Bone”
(from Northwestern
University)


University of Oxford & University of Bristol’s
high-speed 3D bioprinting

Mingjing Lin and Tsai-Chun Huang 3D printed textiles made for the Beijing Opera, performed at the RCA. Photo by Michael Petch.Mingjing Lin and
Tsai-Chun Huang 3D printed textiles made for the Beijing Opera,
performed at the RCA. Photo by Michael Petch.

Creative use of 3D printing


AiBuild Bottletop shop project

BAELF DESIGN


Royal College of Art/Beijing Opera Project


Stranger Things

The Bottletop store has a 3D printed mesh covered with cans. Photo by Michael Petch.The Bottletop store has
a 3D printed mesh covered with cans. Photo by Michael Petch.

Innovation of the year


Carbon & Adidas Futurecraft4D

Desktop Metal printing

FormLabs Fuse-1


Blackbelt


Pyrogenesis

3D Printing Material company of the year


BASF

ColorFabb (For nGEN Flex)


DSM Somos

Filamentive

Proto-Pasta

Reflow

Rigid.ink

3D Scanning Project or Application of the year

B9 Scan 350

Scan the World

Skanect

The forthcoming Artec LEO 3D scanner. Photo by Michael Petch.The forthcoming Artec
LEO 3D scanner. Photo by Michael Petch.

3D software of the year

Astroprint

Authentise Inc

Cura

Fusion 360

Materialise Magics

Rhino Gold 6.5

Siemens NX

Simplify 3D

ZBrush

HP was a winner in the 2017 3D Printing Industry Awards.HP was a winner in the
2017 3D Printing Industry Awards.

Personal 3D printer of the year (FFF)

Anet A6

B9 Core 530

Cubicon Single Plus

M3D Micro+

MakerBot Replicator+

Original Prusa i3 MK3

Robo C2

Ultimaker 3

Zortrax M200

Personal 3D printer of the year (other)

B9 Core Series

Form 2

Sinterit Lisa

The 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy sitting pretty at Markforgeds formnext booth. Photo by Beau Jackson for 3D Printing IndustryThe 2017 3D Printing
Industry Awards trophy sitting pretty at Markforged’s formnext
booth. Photo by Beau Jackson.

Enterprise 3D printer of the year (Polymers)

Carbon M2

EnvisionTEC DLP line

EOS P 500

HP MJF

Markforged X7

VSHAPER PRO

Enterprise 3D printer of the year (Metal)

3D Systems ProX 320

Desktop Metal

EOS M400

ORLAS CREATOR

SLM Solutions

Xjet

OEM of the year (personal)

E3D

Lulzbot

Sintratec

Ultimaker

A remix of the Laocoon group was used for the 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy.A remix of the Laocoon
group was used for the 3D Printing Industry Awards trophy.

OEM of the year (enterprise)

3D Systems

EOS

HP

Markforged

SLM Solutions

Breakthrough application of the year

3D Construction Printing

Ambionics

Carbon & Adidas Futurecraft 4D

LLNL Stainless Steel 3D printing ( Y. Morris Wang et
al.)

PostPro3D

Siert Wijnia,
co-founder of Ultimaker (left) and Michael Petch EIC at 3D
Printing Industry.

3D Printing Region of the year

Barcelona

Boston, MA

Kraków

London

Paris

San Francisco

Sheffield

Singapore

Desktop Metal CTO & Co-founder Jonah Myerberg accepts the award for 3D Printing Industry Start-up of the Year.Desktop Metal CTO &
Co-founder Jonah Myerberg accepts the award for 3D Printing
Industry Start-up of the Year.

How to make a nomination

Do you agree with the nominations so far? Let us know who
the voters are missing and make your own nominations for
the

2018 3D Printing Industry
Awards
 now.

If don’t want to miss announcements about the 3D
Printing Industry Awards, make sure you subscribe

to
the 3D Printing Industry
newsletter
, like us
on Facebook
and follow us on
Twitter.

Featured image shows the 2017 3D Printing Industry Awards
trophies, made using metal filament from The Virtual
Foundry
.

Freeze – Imperial College London 3D prints soft tissues using cryogenics

The main challenge of synthetic tissue is fabricating it in a
way that tricks the body into believing that it has been there
all along. As a
recent preprint
from Stanford University shows, even

CRISPR gene editing
isn’t entirely safe from the body’s
immune system, though many other
regenerative medicine therapies
have already been tried and
tested to positive effect.

At Imperial College
London
, a method combining 3D printing and cryogenics may
have the answer to replicating the texture of soft tissues in
the body, and potentially fooling parts of our lungs and brain.

A hydrogel popsicle

The Imperial College method takes advantage of the liquid to
solid phase change of a composite hydrogel ink. An Ultimaker 2
is modified to deposit the ink. It requires a setup that
suspends a stainless steel print bed over a bath of dry ice and
isopropanol (a secondary alcohol and common ingredient
of antiseptics, disinfectants and detergents).

Schematic of Imperial College London's cryogenic 3D printing setup. Image via Scientific ReportsSchematic of Imperial
College London’s cryogenic 3D printing setup. Image via
Scientific Reports

Upon contact with the bed, the ink solidifies. “This is
achieved by rapidly cooling the ink solution below its freezing
point using solid carbon dioxide (CO2) in an isopropanol
bath,” explain
Imperial’s researchers.

“The setup was able to successfully create 3D complex
geometrical structures, with an average compressive stiffness
of O(1) kPa (0.49 ± 0.04 kPa stress at 30% compressive strain)
and therefore mimics the mechanical properties of the softest
tissues found in the human body (e.g. brain and lung).”

Previously cryogenically 3D printed would typically
disintegrate in use. But now, the researchers were able to
apply living cell samples to the
3D printed scaffolds
.

Schematic structure of the 3D printed scaffold (a, b) and the frozen (c) thawed (d) result. Image via Scientific ReportsSchematic structure
of the 3D printed scaffold (a, b) and the frozen (c) thawed (d)
result. Image via Scientific Reports

Cell survivors

The soft 3D printed scaffolds were successfully seeded with
live dermal fibroblast cells. An ability to attach and survive
on the hydrogel (when coated with collagen) shows great
potential for the range of cryogenically 3D printed inks.

Though the current scaffolds are only a few centimeters in
size, they provide a promising foundation to build towards a
full organ. As detailed in the supporting study, this
method broadens the scope of application “from soft tissue

phantoms
for surgical training and simulations to
mechanobiology and tissue engineering.”

Cryogenic 3D Printing of Super
Soft Hydrogels
’ is available to read online in
Scientific Reports journal. It is co-authored
by Zhengchu Tan, Cristian Parisi, Lucy Di Silvio, Daniele
Dini and Antonio Elia Forte.


Nominate the best research teams of 2017 
in
the second annual 3D Printing Industry Awards here.

Subscribe to the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
follow us
on Twitter
, and like us
on Facebook
 here.

Featured image shows the structure of Imperial College
London’s cryogenically 3D printed cell scaffolds. Image via
Scientific Reports.

Techniplas hosts Nano Dimension and launch of Nexa3D NXV 3D printer at CES 2018

More news about 3D printing at CES 2018, with Nexa3D showcasing its first
professional 3D printer at the Techniplas booth, alongside 3D
printed electronics company Nano Dimension.

The new SLA 3D printer uses proprietary
Lubricant Sublayer Photo-curing (LSPc) and structured light
matrix technology to manufacture objects at up to 1cm/min and
2700cc/hr. 

As such, the Nexa3D 3D printer is well placed
for a range of applications including aerospace, dental,
functional prototyping, production tooling and hi-mix
low-volume manufacturing.

The Nexa3D NXV with blue
lighting. Image via Nexa3D.

A CES 2018 Debut

Avi Reichental is a co-founder of Nexa3D and
also former CEO of 3D
Systems
, and he continues to be highly active in the 3D
printing industry, currently working with an impressive range
of 3D printer enterprises.

The debut of the Nexa3D NXV 3D printer follows
a series of strategic partnerships with other companies. In
November 2017, the company
formed a partnership with BEGO and
XYZprinting
, which permitted BEGO to sell special
high-speed dental printers manufactured by XYZprinting and
branded under Nexa3D.

This was followed by a strategic investment by
XYZprinting and crowdfunding platform OurCrowd, which
brought the company’s total early-stage
funding to $10 million
.

Following this investment, Nexa3D has
developed a 3D printer that features in addition deep machine
learning algorithms to intelligently slice, optimize and
adaptively compile complex geometries at a uniform speed of
1cm/min, and a 30 micron XY resolution. 

The Nexa3D NXV also has automotive applications. Photo via Nexa3D.The Nexa3D NXV also has
automotive applications. Photo via Nexa3D.

3D printing as a competitor to injection molding

Reichental described the new $19,950 3D
printer as a potential “category maker,” and its release
Nexa3D’s participation in an open innovation program run by
injection molding company Techniplas (whose
additive manufacturing centre head is also
Reichental
).

Nano Dimension, which counts Reichental
amongst its board members has also announced that it will be
joining the Techniplas open innovation program, bringing
its industrial-grade DragonFly 2020
Pro 3D Printer
 into the Techniplas additive
manufacturing Innovation Center.

“3D printing is an unstoppable force of
change in every industry and within it, high-speed 3D
printing is the next frontier in additive manufacturing and
one that is highly valued by end-users, strategic partners,
resellers and investors alike,”

“After several years of bootstrapping through
the early stages of proving and nailing our game-changing
technology, we are gratified to be here at CES 2018 with some
of our early access marquee users and resellers who are
partnering with us to validate the scaling of our first
product,” said Reichental.

The new Nexa3D  printer will be on
display at 
Techniplas booth #9100 at the Las Vegas Convention
Center from 9-12 January 2018.

Nominations for the second annual 3D
Printing Industry Awards are now open. 
Make
your selections now.

For more updates on CES 2018, subscribe to our free 3D Printing Industry
newsletter
, follow us
on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Featured image showsNexa3D NXV printer with parts. Photo
via Nexa3D.

ParaMatters launches CogniCAD and joins Techniplas Open Innovation at CES 2018

Continuing our coverage of 3D printing at CES 2018, topology optimisation
software company ParaMatters
has launched its new CogniCAD platform for automatically
generating light-weighted structures for aerospace and
automotive applications.

ParaMatters will be exhibiting at the Techniplas booth within CES 2018, after joining
the automotive machining company’s Open Innovation
Platform.

From CAD to finished product with minimal
user input

A pay per design cloud-based service, CogniCAD
initially allows users to import CAD files into the platform,
before defining loading and design criteria.

The program then automatically generates a
design verified and ready for 3D printing using ParaMatters’
advanced algorithms, which calculate lightweight and
metamaterial lattice structures based on the size, weight,
strength, style and materials specified by the user.

CogniCAD applies “advanced topology
optimization techniques, computational geometry, infinite
computing power in the cloud, and artificial intelligence” to
accurately determine the necessary structures.

“We are transforming the entire
design-to-manufacturing process by making it autonomous and
automated to generate high-quality, optimized light-weighted
designs.”

“Our proprietary generative engine
automatically delivers high performance and quality designs
with minimal user input,” said ParaMatters CTO Michael
Bogomolny. “As a result, the entire design cycle is compressed
from days to hours, and raises the quality of generative
designs compared to what can be achieved manually.”

ParaMatters offers topology optimization. Image via ParaMatters.ParaMatters offers
topology optimization. Image via ParaMatters.

Joining the Techniplas Open Innovation
Program

As
ParaMatters joins the Techniplas Open Innovation Program
alongside companies such as
Nano Dimension and Nexa3D
, its CogniCAD software will be
available on Techniplas
Prime’s expanded digital manufacturing
platform
.

“Today’s announcement paves the way for making
additive manufacturing the light-weighting engine of choice for
the automotive industry,” said Avi Reichental, CEO of
Techniplas Digital. “With ParaMatters on board, we are bringing
together some of the latest light-weighting and additive
technology companies within Techniplas’ expanding network,
which is fast becoming the preeminent hub for industry 4.0
collaboration.”

 

ParaMatters services allow modelling on demand. Image via ParaMatters.ParaMatters services
allow modelling on demand. Image via ParaMatters.

Nominations for the second annual 3D Printing Industry
Awards are now open. 
Make
your selections now.

For more coverage of CES
2018, 
subscribe to our
free 3D Printing Industry newsletter
, follow us on Twitter, and like us
on 
Facebook.

Featured image shows a Nubular lightweight structure by the
Cargo Collective. CogniCAD’s topology optimization focusses on
light-weighting structures. Photo via Cargo Collective.

SHINING 3D unveils EinScan Discovery and HD Prime Packs at CES 2018

In the latest announcement regarding 3D printing at
CES 2018
, China’s SHINING 3D presents two new accessories
for its
well-known EinScan line
of handheld 3D scanners.

The EinScan Discovery Pack and HD Prime Pack upgrade
SHINING’s existing hardware with color and further detail,
contributing the company’s complete “3D scan to 3D print”
solution.

Oscar Meza, SHINING 3D’s V.P. of Global Sales comments, “We
successfully launched EinScan-Pro+, the multifunctional
handheld 3D scanner and EinScan SE&SP desktop 3D scanners
last year, which offer our customers more choices to meet their
most varied demands.”

“This year, we refine the EinScan Series by adding two new
powerful accessories, which strengthen the capabilities and
expand the range of applications.”

Colorful 3D scans

The EinScan Discovery is a tripod 3D scanner based on
the EinScan-SE (Elite) and EinScan-SP models
seen in our visit to SHINING EMEA HQ
last year.

Hardware of the new EinScan Discovery Pack. Image via SHINING 3DHardware of the new
EinScan Discovery Pack. Image via SHINING 3D

In addition to a 3D surface, the Discover is capable of
capturing color by using an Ultra-FineTM Hardware ISP video
processing engine.

At a rate of up to 3.0 megapixel per operation, color texture
is captured at 12.0 megapixels – similar values as a digital
camera. To help with the process, the 3D scanner also has
a built-in 24-bit true-color display.

SHINING recommends the Discovery pack for customers creating
“virtual reality, online shopping (eCommerce) virtual display,
online museum, 3D exhibition and more.”

Color capture with the EinScan Discovery Pack. Image via SHINING 3DColor capture with
the EinScan Discovery Pack. Image via SHINING 3D

Faithful replication

The handheld EinScan HD Prime has two modes – one for rapid 3D
scanning, the other for capturing finer “high definition”
details.

Essentially a souped-up EinScan-Pro+ the HD Prime’s Rapid
Scan improves the speed of its predecessor by 30%. This mode is
perfect for quick capture of objects that will later be refined
in 3D design software.

Captured data is smooth, and small details are skipped in
favour of the overall shape of an object.

Demonstration of the two possible EinScan HD Prime modes. Image via SHINING 3DDemonstration of the
two possible EinScan HD Prime modes. Image via SHINING 3D

HD mode, by comparison, picks out an object’s details, ideally
working indoors. According to SHINING the HD Prime is
ideal for applications such as “Reverse Designing, Cultural
Heritage Preservation, Archiving [and]Restoration.”

Installed with SHINING’s latest 3D scanning software update,
the Prime is also capable of capturing a object without the
need for using stick-on light markers, make the process less
labor intensive.

The HD Prime operates at a rate of 10 frames per second and,
like the EinScan Discovery the distance between scanned point
data is typically 0.09-0.12 mm.

Read more about 3D printing and
3D scanning at CES 2018
.

EinScan HD Prime handheld 3D scanner. Image via SHINING 3DEinScan HD Prime
handheld 3D scanner. Image via SHINING 3D

For more of the latest 3D tech at CES 2018 and other 3D
industry related shows subscribe to the 3D
Printing Industry newsletter
follow us
on Twitter
, and like us
on Facebook.


Nominate SHINING 3D and more 
in
the second annual 3D Printing Industry Awards here.

Featured image shows SHINING’s Discovery and HD Prime
showcase for CES 2018. Image via SHINING 3D.

Dassault Systèmes and Rize 3D printing at CES 2018

More news about 3D
printing at CES 2018
arrives from Las Vegas.
This time from French software developer, Dassault Systèmes and 3D printer
manufacturer Rize from
Woburn, MA.

CES attendees can visit the North Hall of the Las Vegas
Convention Center and the Dassault Systèmes’ booth – #8300
specifically – to see the Rize One 3D printer and take part in
a 3D printed giveaway.


Rize President and CEO, Andy Kalambi,
will be available to
demonstrate how Rize “supports Dassault Systèmes’ inclusive
strategy for enabling collaborative technology ecosystems to
develop and deliver new and sustainable solutions in
consumer-centered sectors, such as healthcare, as well as in
commercial and industrial sectors.”

Rize's newly appointed President and CEO Andy Kalambi. Photo via Julie ReeceRize’s newly appointed
President and CEO Andy Kalambi. Photo via Rize.

Global entrepreneurs access 3D printing

The French software developer has chosen CES 2018 to
announce a Global Entrepreneur Program to support startups,
entrepreneurs and makers. The program leverages Dassault
Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform, applications, expertise, and
community of mentors and services

Already more than 1,000 startups, entrepreneurs and
makers are in the Global Entrepreneur Program, that gives
access to range of technology – including 3D printing. Other
news from Dassault Systemes this week, includes a three-year
contract with
Toyota Motor
Europe
to develop next generation digital
marketing solutions for all car launches in Europe.

Toyota, Pizza Hut and Black Mirror

While unconnected with Dassault Systemes, Toyota has also
generated a lot of coverage at CES 2018 for their e-Palette
driverless pod.

These self-driving vehicles are part of a concept that
shows each base unit a configurable for a specific function. A
video illustrates how a mobile Fab Lab with a robotic arm could
allow engineers and designers to take deadline brinkmanship to
the next level, or how a burning man style desert festival
could be summoned with a couple of clicks on an app.

I particularly enjoyed the idea that future spectators at
a boxing match in the desert might enjoy sushi or even visit
the mobile gym – during a sports event, in the desert.

A screencap from the Toyota promo video shows people enjoying a boxing match in the desert.A screencap from the
Toyota promo video shows people enjoying a boxing match in the
desert.

The e-Palette design is reminiscent of Local Motors’ Olli
– the

3D printed autonomous shuttle bus
that
recently secured $1 billion worth of operational support.
Comparisons have also been drawn with Season 4 of Charlie
Brooker’s Black Mirror. Specifically, a Pizza Hut collaboration
using the e-Palette concept for a fully autonomous delivery
vehicle.

Self driving pizza delivery caught the attention of Black Mirror.Self driving pizza
delivery caught the attention of Black Mirror.

You can read more coverage of 3D
printing and 3D printers at CES 2018

here.

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Featured image shows the Rize One 3D printer. Photo by
Michael Petch.

Multimaterial 3D printing advances by the pixel with new Neri Oxman patent

Neri Oxman and
colleagues Dominik Kolb, James Weaver and
Christoph Bader at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s
(MIT) Mediated
Matter group
have published a patent for multimaterial 3D
printing.

Published December 28th 2017, the patent discusses a way
of translating 3D scanned point-cloud
data
into an operational command for 3D printers.

The patent was granted ahead of a potential sea-change in the
3D printing industry, in which machines are gradually moving
toward the possibility of mixing more than one material in a
single 3D print.

So far, Stratasys
PolyJet 3D printers
, the
3D Systems ProJet series
and Nano Dimension’s
DragonFly 2020
are among the few providers that boast
multimaterial abilities, and expansion of material
portfolios for 3D printers such as HP’s Multi Jet Fusion

and
Rize Inc.’s Rize One
promises to continue growing this
market in the near future.

With more than one material involved it becomes clearer now,
more than ever, that 3D printers need something more than the
average .stl file – it is not only layers to be communicated in
the Gcode, but also what material is needed where.

Oxman, Kolb, Weaver and Bader address this challenge taking a
pixel by pixel approach.

Chart detailing the process described in Oxman, Kolb, Weaver and Bader's patent. Image via FPOChart detailing the
process described in Oxman, Kolb, Weaver and Bader’s patent.
Image via FPO

The bearable lightness of point-clouds

Oxman et al’s method starts with point-cloud data, typically
created using a 3D scanner that can be enmeshed later to make a
digital, 3D model.

The main benefit of starting with a point cloud, is that the
data is relatively “light” allowing large objects and areas to
be visualized with minimal processing power. The technique is
commonly used in land-surveillance technology, e.g.
in ScanLAB Project’s digital render of Italy
, and
to make an interactive exploration of museums
.

Point cloud data of donut. Gif via Kieff/Wikimedia CommonsPoint cloud data of a donut. Gif via
Kieff/Wikimedia Commons

Sort and slice

In the first step, the unorganized point cloud is converted
into a spatial data structure that relates to the object
in question.

To give a 3D scanned bicycle wheel as an example – the spatial
data measures the length of each spoke. Point cloud data, by
contrast, doesn’t measure any part of the wheel. The points are
essentially meaningless, unless they are somehow connected.

Spatial data for an object is then sliced into layers
comprising the overall 3D structure, and each layer
is computationally divided into pixels.

Each step of the point-cloud to pixels data file prep as detailed in the Oxman et al. patent. FIG 2A/2B show the spatial data structure. FIG. 2C through 2E shows how spatial data is split into layers. In FIG 2F, the data is sorted into pixels. In 2G the pixels are mixed with materials. And finally, FIG 2H demonstrates how each pixel layer is built up to make a 3D object. Image via FPOEach step of the
point-cloud to pixels data file prep as detailed in the Oxman et
al. patent. FIG 2A/2B show the spatial data structure. FIG. 2C
through 2E shows how spatial data is split into layers. In FIG
2F, the data is sorted into pixels. In 2G the pixels are mixed
with materials. And finally, FIG 2H demonstrates how each pixel
layer is built up to make a 3D object. Image via FPO

Pixel mixing

At this point in the process, you have a 3D object that has
been reduced to pixels. Now, you need to determine how these
pixels should be filled to create the designed object.
Returning to the bike wheel example – which parts are metal and
which parts are rubber? Furthermore, if one part is rubber, how
dense or flexible does it need to be? And also, what color is
it?

With this information, part (d) of the patented method can be
calculated. Each respective layer is given a set of binary
raster files (dot matrix structures) “that encode material
deposition instructions.”

As described in U.S patent no. 20170368755: "FIGS. 3A to 3D together show steps in a method of determining a material mixing ratio for a pixel. In FIG. 3A, a spatial query is performed. In FIG. 3B, filtering is performed. In FIG. 3C, a lookup table is consulted to determine a material mixing ratio. In FIG. 3D, a material mixing ratio is assigned to a pixel." Image via FPOAs described in U.S
patent no. 20170368755: “FIGS. 3A to 3D together show steps in a
method of determining a material mixing ratio for a pixel. In
FIG. 3A, a spatial query is performed. In FIG. 3B, filtering is
performed. In FIG. 3C, a lookup table is consulted to determine a
material mixing ratio. In FIG. 3D, a material mixing ratio is
assigned to a pixel.” Image via FPO

And finally…print

In the penultimate step, Gcode-like instructions are generated
for the respective 3D printer based on binary raster files for
the layers. Then voila! A multimaterial 3D object is made.

Pixels, not voxels

A similar concept using 3D pixels, i.e. voxels, has been
considered before in
research by MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial
Intelligence Lab (CSAIL)
. Addressing this conventional
approach, the Oxman et al. patent states that this “tends to be
impractical due to the extremely massive dataset needed to
describe a large multi-material object by a 3D voxel
representation” in relation to a 3D printer’s resolution.

Applying the specifications of a Stratasys J750 3D Printer
as an example the inventors state, “At this native resolution
(which is in the approximate range of many multi-material 3D
printers), the amount of data required for a 3D voxel
representation of a large (e.g. more than 40 cm×30 cm×20 cm),
multi-material object would typically be massive,”

“Indeed, the dataset would typically be so large that it
would be impractical in most real-world scenarios, either due
to insufficient memory or massive computational load
resulting in very slow processing.”

U.S. Patent Application 20170368755, alternately
titled Methods
and Apparatus for 3D Printing of Point Cloud
Data
 can be accessed online.


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Featured image shows each step of the point-cloud to pixels
data file prep as detailed in the Oxman et al. patent. Image
via FPO

CELLINK partners with CTI BIOTECH for 3D bioprinted cancer research

Swedish 3D bioprinter provider CELLINK has released details of
a partnership with French regenerative medicine research and
development company CTI
BIOTECH
.

A fully licensed human tissue biobank, CTI BIOTECH is
using CELLINK 3D bioprinters to create tumorous tissue models
in-lab, and investigate new therapies for patients with cancer.

Professor Colin McGuckin, Founder of CTI BIOTECH, said, “We are
proud to partner with CELLINK to advance our 3D Printing
technologies in cancer personalized medicine.”

Tour of the BIO X 3D bioprinter, as used in CTI BIOTECH
research. CLip via CELLINK
3D
 on YouTube.

Understanding cancer on a cellular level

It has been almost a year since CELLINK announced the launch of
its
latest 3D bioprinter – the BIO X
. Now installed in CTI
BIOTECH’s lab, the BIO X will work with cells extracted from
tissue samples of cancer patients tumors.

Combined with a supportive material, i.e.
a hydrogel
, these cells will be 3D printed into live
replica tumors that can be used to test response to new
treatments.

It is hoped that the models will be able to reduce the costly
40%+ attrition rate of pre-clinical drug screenings. According
to Professor McGuckin, “Cancer therapies have been severely
limited by our understanding of how the cancer grows in 3D
tumors.”

3D bioprinting and cancer

A number of international research institutions, including
the Indian Institute of
Technology Hyderabad
and KU Leuven have been

evaluating the value of 3D bioprinting for cancer research

in recent years.

The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) is
using its
body-on-a-chip device
to test new drugs for the disease,
and even
NASA has taken 3D bioprinters in space
to test the
fabrication of cancer tissue models.

Mini 3D printed noses (pink) and an ear (blue) in a hydrogel from CELLINK.A selection of
CELLINK 3D printed gel samples from the INKREDIBLE, including
mini 3D printed noses (pink) and an ear (blue). Photo by Beau
Jackson

Better treatments for unpredictable diseases

Erik Gatenholm, co-founder and CEO of CELLINK comments, “We are
always excited when our technologies are used to accelerate
research and enable new advancements,”

“The oncology research field is one of the major focus areas
for us and we see a strong benefit of using our bioprinting
platform to develop better and more realistic cancer tissue
models so that we can develop better treatments.”

In November 2017, CELLINK also received €350,000 ($417,889 USD)
from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 initiative. Together
with 5 other partners, CELLINK will be working on the
SilkFUSION project to genetically engineer platelets for
“transfusion and drug research.”

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developments at 3D Printing Industry on
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Industry and
nominate them here.

Featured image shows a sample 3D bioprinted ear model.
Photo via CELLINK

Polaroid launches four new 3D printers at CES 2018

Returning to our coverage of 3D printing at
CES 2018
, Polaroid,
a company otherwise best known for its instant photography
technology, has launched four new desktop 3D printers. The
consumer 3D printers are the latest to be launched by Polaroid
since the
ST3Di 3D printer range
in
2016.

The latest Polaroid range of the Polaroid Nano
Duo, Polaroid Nano Mini, Polaroid Nano Glide and the Polaroid
Nano+ 3D printers, is available from April and will be aimed
primarily at the US and Canadian markets.

Plug in and Play with the Polaroid Nano
Mini

The Polaroid Nano Mini 3D printer is aimed at
beginners and features one-button control, reduced motor noise
and a price of $349 to facilitate this. The 7.4 x 7.4 x
7.8-inch overall volume and 3.1 x 3.1 x 3.5-inch build volume
make it a compact option for personal use. The Polaroid Nano
Mini is compatible with PLA 1.75mm filament.

The Polaroid Nano Glide 3D Printer. Photo via Polaroid.A 3D Printer from
the Polaroid Nano range. Photo via Polaroid.

Compact area and large projects with the
Polaroid Nano Glide

Also accessible for desktop use, the Polaroid
Nano Glide 3D printer has an overall volume of 10.2 x 9.8 x
10.2 inches, and a larger build volume of 4.7 x 4.7 x 4.7
inches. It is equipped with a sliding printing bed, a smart
sensor to alert users to a filament refill, and child safety
doors. Also compatible with PLA 1.75mm filament, it is
available for $479.

Smart technology and safety with the
Polaroid Nano+

Sharing the smart sensor and child safety
doors of the Nano Glide, the Polaroid Nano+ 3D printer offers
faster, more accurate and stabler prints with an inbuilt LCD
interface, Wi-Fi connectivity and a dedicated smartphone app
for remote control. Compatible with PLA 1.75mm filament, the
Nano+ offers a build volume of 4.7 x 4.7 x 4.7 inch and an 11 x
11 x 11-inch overall volume. The Polaroid Nano+ 3D printer
costs $549.

A colorful multi-material option with the
Polaroid Nano Duo

Available for $1849, the Polaroid Nano Duo not
only offers the LCD, Wi-Fi connectivity and smartphone control
(with added cloud storage for designs and a built-in monitoring
camera) of the Nano+, but it is compatible with a wide range of
filament types including ABS, wood, TPU, metal and PLA 1.75mm
filament.

A dual print-head enables multicolour or
multi-material 3D printing, while a build volume of 11.8 x 8.8
x 12.6 inches in a 17.7 x 14.1 x 22-inch overall volume allows
the fabrication of larger objects.

The Polaroid Booth at CES 2018 will be displaying the printers from 9-12 January. Photo via Polaroid.The Polaroid Booth at
CES 2018 will be displaying the printers from 9-12 January. Photo
via Polaroid.

Accessible creativity from
Polaroid

“At Polaroid, we have an
80-year history of not only making the latest technology
accessible to the everyday consumer but also providing users
with products that allow them to express their creativity,”
said Polaroid CEO Scott W. Hardy.

“We’re proud to offer the latest in 3D
printing technology to give users a new way to express
themselves at a price point that puts the technology within
reach for use in any home, school or business.”

The full range of Polaroid 3D printers will be
on display at the Polaroid booth, Central Hall
#16615, CES 2018 from 9-12 January.

Nominations for the second annual 3D
Printing Industry Awards are now open. 
Make
your selections now.

For more stories from CES 2018,
subscribe to our free 3D Printing Industry
newsletter
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Featured image shows the Polaroid booth at
CES 2018. Photo via Polaroid.