voxeljet signs contract to supply TEI, largest user of 3D printed sand in the US

voxeljet, a manufacturer of large-format
3D printers and casting molds has announced a 3-year Volume
Contract with Tooling and
Equipment International
(TEI), a producer of cast metal
parts.

As part of the deal, TEI will purchase over
500,000 liters of 3D printed sand from voxeljet, which will
also install its large-format 3D printers at TEI’s facility in
Livonia, Michigan.

3D printed sand mold before washing. Photo via voxeljet.3D printed sand mold
before washing. Photo via voxeljet.

3D printed sand for casting

Sand casting is a process where molten metal
is poured into molds made of sand and cast into shapes. These
molds can be produced using a
binder jetting 3D printing process
, where sand is applied
in layers and selectively bound with an agent into the desired
shape.

3D printing is an economical way of producing
casting molds without the need for complex and expensive
tools. voxeljet 3D prints sand molds using
its large-format
3D printers
, which have a build volume of up to 4,000 x
2,000 x 1,000 mm, and bind the sand using cold-hardening furan
resin.

Binder jetting produces molds with
sophisticated geometries, undercuts, and a smooth surface
quality. 
The sand can also be
removed and recycled after casting.

voxeljet's large format 3D printer manufacturing sand casting molds. Photo via voxeljet.voxeljet’s large format
3D printer manufacturing sand casting molds. Photo via voxeljet.

Casting call for TEI

TEI is the largest user of 3D printed sand in
the USA, producing prototypes and low volume components in
aluminum, iron, and steel. These cast parts are predominantly
used by the automotive, aerospace and defense
industries.

With the addition of voxeljet’s large-format
3D printers, TEI will now bring its full industrial process
into a single facility. This includes design, 3D sand printing,
casting, heat treatment, machining, and post-machining
inspection.

Oliver Johnson, President of TEI commented:

“With voxeljet working alongside us to
supply molds and cores, we will be able to compress lead
times even further for our customers while also setting new
records in terms of the size and weight of parts we can
cast.”

“The 3D printing industry is at an inflection
point, and this marks another milestone in our mission to push
3D printing into industrial production,” added David Tait,
voxeljet’s Managing Director.

Let us know what you think the most innovative 3D printing
OEM has been this year. Nominations for the

3D Printing Industry Awards
2018
are only open for another week. Submit
yours now.

Think you have the winning design for this year’s
trophy?

Protolabs
is sponsoring
the

2018 3D Printing Industry Awards design
competition
. Submit your design now to win a
3D printer.

For more stories on 3D printing and metal
casting, subscribe to our
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,
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Featured image shows a cast metal part from a 3D printed
sand mold. Photo via voxeljet.

Interview: Carbon cuts through the hype with new FDA approved dental materials

Carbon’s new 3D printable DENTCA resins have been released
with
approval from the FDA
. As materials for
dentistry, DENTCA Denture Base II and DENTCA Denture Teeth
resins, are subject to an exception in FDA certification that
typically would not pass certification on 3D printer materials.

In this interview with Steven Pollack, Senior Staff
Research Scientist at Carbon, 3D Printing Industry learns more
about Carbon’s
anticipated
role in the medical and dental market, and
plans for the future.

Digital traceability and rapid production

DENTCA Denture Base II and DENTCA Denture Teeth 3D printable
resins are the product of Carbon’s partnership with CAD/CAM
denture manufacturing specialist DENTCA. They allow technicians
without any traditional denture making experience, to make
prosthetics suitable for oral use.

In this same period, Carbon has also partnered with DREVE,
another dental specialist, that is collaborating to make 3D
printed gingiva gum masks and trays.

One of the advantages of 3D printing these devices, is that
Carbon offers digital traceability of the process, with part
serialization. Digital Light Processing (DLP) powered CLIP 3D
printing, also reduces the amount of time taken to complete a
product.

Carbon's CLIP technology is used to print a Bucky ball. Photo via Youtube/Carbon.Carbon’s CLIP 3D
printing technology. Photo via Carbon.

FDA certification

Dental materials cleared by the FDA fall into one of two
classes: Class I which signifies minimum to no risk, and Class
II that indicates some risk. Class III would be high risk, but
very few dental devices make this grade, they also require
pre-market approval before they can be sold.

DENTCA Denture Base II and DENTCA Denture Teeth have Class II
approval from the FDA.

“Since the manufacturer of the final devices derived from these
materials are dentists, dental laboratories, orthodontists and
the like,” explains Pollack, “[the]FDA made the decision early
in its history to regulate the materials “capable” of
producing final dental devices.”

Materials in this class include alloys, ceramic and polymers,
all those “that take final form in the hands of a practitioner
or lab.”

The equivalence principle

For lower risk Class II, manufacturers can go through the
510(k) process. A process shared by
some spinal implants
. By testing the 3D printable material
alongside another, already-martketed and safe medical device,
low-risk materials can achieve FDA certification.

Pollack explains, “The majority of Class II devices require the
manufacturer to provide pre-clinical (bench testing), and
sometimes limited clinical data to prove the device is
“substantially equivalent” to an existing product in commerce
that is FDA-cleared,

“There are also some “Unclassified” dental devices,” he adds,
“That is, they were not put into a risk category in 1976, when
the risk- based system was set up. These are generally treated
as 510(k) devices because their risk has not been established.”

A dental 3D printing solution. Image via CarbonA dental 3D
printing solution. Image via Carbon

Who will come out on top?

The market for 3D printing in dental is getting increasingly
crowded.

At the beginning of 2017,
3D Systems acquired NextDent
as part of a deal
with Vertex-Global Holding B.V. revealing the intention to
use the company’s already approved materials in the Figure 4
configuration. This week VJ, 3D Systems CEO, announced the

launch of the NextDent 5100 3D printer
, the first
products of this partnership. In an interview with 3D Printing
Industry VJ underlined the significance of this vertical
saying, “dentistry is the critical market for 3D Systems.”

Stratasys is also advancing in the dental market with
the Objet260 Dental 3D Printer, EnvisionTEC have served
the dental sector for a long time while DWS are one of the more
recent market entrants.

Meanwhile, Carbon has every intention of staying in the race.
Pollack concludes,

“While I can’t get into specifics, we’ve seen firsthand the
many benefits that 3D manufacturing offers in this important
industry, and we’re committed to continuing to develop new
materials that enable us to improve lives.”

For more of the latest in digital dentistry and medicine
subscribe to the most widely read
newsletter in the industry
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Could Carbon’s dental resins be material of the year? Make
your nominations for the
2018 3D Printing Awards
now before they close next
week. 


Protolabs
 is sponsoring the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards
design competition
. Want to design this year’s
trophy? Submit your design now to win a 3D printer.

Featured image shows a 3D printed dental impression.
Photo via Carbon

Stratasys unveils Objet260 Dental 3D Printer to advance adoption of digital dentistry

Market-leading 3D printer manufacturer
Stratasys has announced its new
Stratasys Objet260 Dental 3D
printer
. Equipped with Polyjet Triple Jetting
technology, the Stratasys Objet260 Dental can 3D print three
different materials on a single tray, allowing the production
of several applications under a single 3D print job.

The machine is to be formally unveiled at the
LMT Lab
Day 2018 in Chicago
alongside two further dental products, flexible biocompatible material MEDFLX625, and Pop-Out
Part (PoP) technology for the removal of supports from clear
aligner arches.

Supporting the transition to digital
dentistry

With the global dental market forecast to
reach 37 billion U.S. dollars by 2021, Stratasys, like rival 3D
printer manufacturer 3D Systems (which yesterday launched its

NextDent 5100 3D printer
), is
capitalizing on its experience of manufacturing machines and
materials for the dental industry to appeal to a wider range of
dental laboratories.

This push from 3D printing to dental
technologies is in the opposite direction to companies like
Straumann, which are moving
incorporating 3D printing into existing dental
businesses.

At the heart of Stratasys’ offering is its
PolyJet Triple Jetting technology, which combines droplets of
three base materials to 3D print objects made of multiple
colors and materials in a single print run. It was launched in
2014 with the
Objet500 Connex3 3D printer.

Clear aligners 3D printed on an Objet260 3D printer. Photo via Stratasys.Clear aligners 3D
printed on an Objet260 3D printer. Photo via Stratasys.

The appeal of PolyJet Triple
Jetting

The Objet260 Dental 3D
printer can be used to manufacture
surgical guides, models, and other appliances. On the 3D
printer’s single material mode, these appliances can be
produced with a shorter change-over and reduced material
waste.

The Objet260 Dental also promises a more
affordable solution for mid-sized labs looking to expand their
services. An optional “Dental Selection” upgrade includes
support for three further regular materials as well as
special
 materials to reproduce a
range of gum-like textures and natural tooth shades.

Reiterating Stratasys’ intentions to place
digital dentistry “in the hands of more customers than ever
before,” Stratasys Director of Healthcare Solutions Mike
Gaisford said:

“There’s no denying the power of 3D printing
for digital dentistry to significantly decrease turnaround
time, reduce labor costs, and provide new streams of revenue.
Multi-material 3D printing pushes the boundaries of what’s
possible in dentistry today while unlocking the
next-generation of applications for tomorrow.”

Additional materials and
technology

Launched alongside the Objet260 Dental 3D
printer, MEDFLX625 is a biocompatible material that allows
dental and orthodontic laboratories to 3D print flexible and
rigid biocompatible materials for direct print applications
such as indirect bonding trays, such as surgical guides and
soft-tissue implant models.

Additionally, PoP technology facilitates
support removal with manual peel-off, which is especially
useful for the high-volume production of clear aligner
arches.

The Objet260 Dental can 3D print multiple materials simultaneously, including accurate models of the oral cavity. Photo via Stratasys.The Objet260 Dental can 3D print
multiple materials simultaneously, including accurate models of
the oral cavity. Photo via Stratasys.

Object260 Dental 3D Printer
specifications

System size: 870 x 735 x 1200 mm 

Build size: 255 x 252 x 200 mm 

System mass: 264 kg

Material cabinet size: 330 x 1170 x 640
mm

Layer thickness: 16 microns (.0006 in.)

Build Resolution: 16-micron (high
quality), 28-micron (high speed)

Compatible materials: VeroDent (MED670),
VeroDentPlus (MED690), VeroGlaze (MED620), Clear Bio-compatible
(MED610),
VeroWhite, and TangoPlus

Support materials: SUP706 (soluble) and SUP705
(WaterJet removable)

Additional materials (Dental Selection
upgrade):
VeroYellow, VeroMagenta, TangoBlackPlus, and
Digital Materials to reproduce a range of
gum-like textures and natural tooth shades.

Software: Objet Studio

Does this stand out as a leading application of 3D printing?
Nominations for the

3D Printing Industry Awards
2018
are only open for another week. Submit
yours now.

Could your design be our awards trophy?
Protolabs
is sponsoring
the

2018 3D Printing Industry Awards design
competition
. Submit your design now to win a
3D printer.

For more stories on 3D printing and dental
applications, 
subscribe to our
free 3D Printing Industry newsletter
, follow us on Twitter, and like us
on 
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Featured image shows the Objet260 Dental 3D printer. Photo
via Stratasys.

Last chance to nominate in 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards

The 3D Printing Industry Awards are back for 2018.

On May 17th 2018, industry leaders will gather at a
central London location where the winners will be announced. To
meet increased demand for tickets we have found a larger venue,
there is some exciting news about this venue coming
soon.

The 3D Printing Industry Awards are nominated and voted
upon by you, our readers. In 2017 we received over 200,000
votes – making the 3D Printing Industry Awards also the largest
survey of the industry.

Jennifer Lewis, holding trophy, and the Lewis Research Group at Harvard, winners of the 2017 Academic/research team of the year.Jennifer Lewis, holding
trophy, and the Lewis Research Group at Harvard, winners of the
2017 Academic/research team of the year.

Previous winners include Ultimaker, Desktop Metal, HP,
Siemens, Autodesk and GE Additive. You can

read more about last year’s event here
.
We will again be joined by Dr. Adrian Bowyer, inventor of the
RepRap and recipient of the 2017 Outstanding Contribution to 3D
Printing Award.

Dr. Adrian Bowyer (right) receives the award for Outstanding Contribution to 3D printing from Michael Petch (left).Dr. Adrian Bowyer
receiving the award for Outstanding Contribution to 3D printing
from Michael Petch.

We’ve already had a record number of nominations across
the 20 categories – but if you haven’t nominated yet then do it
now! Nominations close next week, on the 28th February.


Make your nominations now.

Trophy design competition

Once again the winners will be presented with a unique 3D
printed trophy. For 2018, we’ve partnered with
Protolabs and
MyMiniFactory to find a winning 3D design. If you want your
design work to be seen by 3D printing leaders and win a 3D
printer,

visit the design competition page now
.
Don’t forget to share your design with us on social media
#3DPIAwards.

Protolabs 3D Design Competition for the 3D Printing Industry 2018 trophy.Protolabs 3D Design
Competition for the 3D Printing Industry 2018 trophy.

We’ll be making some more announcements soon about the 3D
Printing Industry Awards, so
subscribe to
our newsletter
and follow us on social media
to make sure you don’t miss the news.


Make your nominations now.

Greg Kress to lead Shapeways ‘design, make, and sell’ ethos as new CEO

3D printing marketplace and service bureau Shapeways has
officially announced the appointment of Gregory Kress as the
company’s new CEO.


Former CEO Peter Weijmarshausen
, and co-founder of
Shapeways, stepped down from the position in August 2017. In
the interim, the company’s COO Tom Finn had been acting CEO.

“While excited about how far we’ve come,” says Kress, “I look
forward to accelerating Shapeways’ vision to become the
complete end-to-end platform helping people, ‘design, make, and
sell,’ regardless of their 3D modeling experience.”

The future of Shapeways

Kress joins Shapeways after leading a strategic and financial
expansion of e-learning company Open English, and 11 years in
senior Sales, Marketing, Supply Chain and Manufacturing
roles at GE. At GE, Kress was part of the
company’s Operations Management Leadership Program, and
graduated from a position as Corporate Leadership staff at GE
Transportation in 2011.

Experience and “deep knowledge” in “growing platform
businesses” is, according to s Albert Wenger, Managing
Partner at Shapeways investor Union Square Ventures, what makes
Kress and asset to the company’s future development.

Shapeways Factory Floor. Photo via ShapewaysShapeways Factory
Floor. Photo via Shapeways

Lateral and vertical expansion

With the appointment of Kress, Shapeways plans to introduce new
lateral and vertical user-led services.

Having collected millions of data points from its base of over
1 million community members and the 185,000+ products 3D
printed and shipped by the service every month, the company
intends to “expand its end-to-end services” under the design,
make and sell ethos, and introduce “production services beyond
3D printing.”

“We know people have ideas or want products that can be made
and sold thanks to advanced design, production, and fulfillment
technology” explains Wenger of Union Square Ventures, “but most
of them don’t know where to begin.”

“Without proper support or infrastructure, the entire process
seems inaccessible, complicated, intimidating, and
expensive.”

Build breakout of an SLS powder cake. Photo via ShapewaysBuild breakout of
an SLS powder cake. Photo via Shapeways

Design it, 3D print it, sell it

Shapeways currently has customers spanning 140 countries, and
employs 250 people at base locations in New York, Eindhoven and
Seattle.

Its 3D printing manufacturing services allow the use of more
than 60 materials, with metallic finishes suited to jewelry,
tech, games miniatures and more.

The site has also been a prominent voice in the recent debate
concerning ISP data control, arguing
pro net neutrality
for the 3D printing community.

Stay up to date with all the latest 3D printing business
news and subscribe to the most widely read
newsletter in the industry
, follow us
on Twitter, and like us on Facebook.

Make your nominations in the 2018
3D Printing Industry Awards
.

Looking for new opportunities to showcase your
creativity? Protolabs is
sponsoring the 2018 3D
Printing Industry Awards design competition.
 Submit
your entries now.

Featured image shows Gregory Kress, CEO of Shapeways.
Photo via Shapeways

Voodoo Manufacturing add Raise3D 3D printers to offer large format 3D printing service

New York-based 3D printing service bureau
Voodoo Manufacturing has
launched a new
Large Format 3D Printing
service, expanding beyond the initial MakerBot 3D printers
currently in use.

The new service, which incorporates 10 new FFF
Raise 3D printers, follows a
$5 million investment
in Voodoo
Manufacturing’s operations led by U.S venture capital firm
General Catalyst in 2017.

Illustration of the increase in build volume Large Format 3D Printing will bring. Image via Voodoo Manufacturing.Illustration of the
increase in build volume Large Format 3D Printing will bring.
Image via Voodoo Manufacturing.

Augmenting sizes, diminishing
times

Prior to introducing the Large Format 3D
Printing service, Voodoo Manufacturing could produce parts up
to 285 x 153 x 155mm. In context, a custom 6-foot tall mannequin
would need to be 3D printed in 90 individual pieces followed by
2-3 hours of assembly.

With the Large Format 3D printing service,
Voodoo Manufacturing can now produce parts with a volume of up
to 300 x 300 x 605mm. With these capabilities, the same custom
mannequin can be 3D printed in 20 parts and assembled in 30
minutes.

Voodoo’s Large Format 3D printing will
initially be available for FFF additive manufacturing,
delivered by the company’s 10 Raise3D N2 Plus 3D
printers
.

The Raise 3D N2 Plus,
which will power Voodoo Manufacturing’s increase in size. Photo
via Raise 3D.

A larger scale and a wider customer
base

Max Friefeld, Voodoo Manufacturing’s CEO,
explained how a combination of the company’s automation
capabilities and 3D printing would disrupt
traditional models in 3D Printing Industry’s
Future of 3D Printing

series.

The combination of Large Format 3D Printing
with Voodoo Manufacturing’s existing technologies now means
that large-scale additive manufacturing now has a turnaround
time of five days.

“We hope that providing our customers the
ability to manufacture large parts will enable new applications
for our service that weren’t possible before,” said Jonathan
Schwartz, co-founder and Chief Product Officer at Voodoo
Manufacturing, adding:

”With this launch, we want to attract new
customers, but also provide existing customers with yet
another reason to keep coming back to Voodoo!”

The Large Format 3D Printing service will be
especially applicable to architectural models, custom signs,
product displays, mannequins, component housings and furniture
prototypes.

There is only one week left to nominate in
the 2018 3D Printing Industry Awards. Make your nominations for
the

3D Printing Industry Awards
2018
now.

For more stories on 3D printing and
Industry 4.0,
subscribe to our free 3D Printing Industry
newsletter
, follow us
on 
Twitter, and like us
on 
Facebook.

Featured image shows Voodoo Manufacturing’s existing
3D printer arsenal. Photo via Voodoo Manufacturing. 

Autodesk opens multi million pound UK advanced manufacturing facility

Millions of pounds have been contributed to establish an
Autodesk Advanced
Manufacturing Facility
(AMF) in the city of Birmingham in
the UK.

The AMF is Autodesk’s sixth technology center in the world,
joining the likes of Australia’s Materials Lab, and the

Pier 9 workshop
in California.

It is equipped with all the latest automated manufacturing
technologies, including
Renishaw metrology systems
, ABB and
KUKA robotic arms
, and a hybrid CNC/metal 3D printer from
DMG Mori. By applying Autodesk’s software expertise, the
facility will showcase the value of intelligent Internet of
Things (IoT) solutions for Industry 4.0.

Inside the AMF. Photo via AutodeskInside the AMF. Photo
via Autodesk

“The convergence of automation technologies like robotics and
machine learning is shaking up traditional manufacturing and
building processes,” says Autodesk president and CEO, Andrew
Anagnost, “Coupling these with cloud computing enables more
people to access their power at much lower costs.”

“….With today’s opening, we hope to fuel excitement and
prepare businesses in all industries for the future of making
things.”

The “future of making things”

At the AMF, Autodesk partners and customers can explore new
machines and potential manufacturing solutions such as
human-robot collaboration. Inline with Autodesk’s expertise,
Big Data is at the core of all projects.

Cloud based platforms, such as Autodesk Fusion Connect, are
showcased for value to the production workflow. The Fusion
Connect service automatically generates performance data,
allowing users to identify potential product failures before
they happen, and adapt quickly to change.

An example of machine monitoring is handily illustrated by a
widget on the AMF’s microsite. Connected to the
center’s Hermle C50C 5-axis milling machine, Fusion
Connect gives live readings of the machine’s status (online or
offline), feed rate and current spindle load.

Real-time monitoring module via Fusion Connect. Image via AutodeskReal-time monitoring
module via Fusion Connect. Image via Autodesk

Autodesk’s collaboration strategy

Aerospace is a key market for the AMF. The center
has AD9100D aviation certification, and UK-based centers
for BMW and GKN Additive are already confirmed collaborators.

An airplane propeller blade is one of the facility’s confirmed
project which has been made using hybrid additive and
subtraction manufacturing.

Through its STEM Ambassador Network, Autodesk will also be
working with local universities and research institutions,
including the
University of Birmingham
, and Coventry’s
Manufacturing Technology Centre
(MTC) which we visited
earlier this month.

Through the MTC, Autodesk is also connected to over 100 other
industry experts including Rolls-Royce, Siemens and
Altair
.

Birmingham-based CAD/CAM company Delcam was also
acquired by Autodesk
in 2013 for an undisclosed
multi-million pound sum.

Stay up to date with all the latest 3D printing business
news and subscribe to the most widely read
newsletter in the industry
, follow us
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Is Autodesk a contender of 3D Software of the Year again in
2018? Make your nominations in the 2018
3D Printing Industry Awards
 now. Nominations close in
one week.

Looking for new opportunities to showcase your
creativity? Protolabs is
sponsoring the 2018 3D
Printing Industry Awards design competition.
 Submit
your entries now.

Featured image shows a KUKA robotic arm in operation at
Birmingham’s Advanced Manufacturing Facility. Photo via
Autodesk/AMF

E3D Online releases upgraded Chimera and Cyclops 3D printer hot-ends

E3D
Online
, a UK-based manufacturer of 3D printer components
has released a new range of
dual-extrusion
hot-ends
for 3D printing. The
upgraded Chimera and Cyclops
hot-ends are available in versions suitable for both
air-cooled and water-cooled dual extrusion.

Customers can choose whether to have a
Chimera+, Chimera Aqua+, Cyclops+, or Cyclops Aqua+ heater
block kit and then add on an air or water-based cooling system,
each with a 12 or 24 V fan.

With this launch, E3D continues its
efforts
bring water-cooled 3D printing
to the hobbyists as well as the professional markets, following
the release of the
Titan Aqua water-cooling system
in
2017.

The Cyclops+ hot-end. Photo via E3D-Online.The Cyclops+ hot-end. Photo via E3D Online.

The Chimera+ and Chimera
Aqua+
for multi-material 3D printing 

The Chimera+ handles
two separate filaments, extruding them via two different
nozzles. Because it the two nozzles can each be heated to two
different temperatures, the Chimera+ hot end is optimized to 3D
print two separate materials (and can also 3D print two
different color filaments).

With a slim design, it is also possible for the dual extrusion
Chimera+ to perform as a single-extrusion
hot-end. A variant of the Chimera+, the
Chimera Aqua+ can be attached to a
separately-sold
 water-based cooling system and
function as a water-cooled hot-end.

The easy customizability of the Chimera+ and
Chimera Aqua+ hot-ends means that they can be further upgraded
with E3D online’s range of
 copper
blocks
 and nozzles
to handle even
higher temperatures.

The Chimera+ hot-end. Photo via E3D Online.The Chimera+ hot-end.
Photo via E3D Online.

The Cyclops+ and the Cyclops Aqua+ for multicolor 3D
printing 

The Cyclops+ hot-end is an upgrade to its
predecessor, the
Cyclops
. The redesigned heater
block has had its redundant material removed, reducing the
amount of radiant heat generated by the hot-end onto the
print.

The single extruder receives one single
filament at a time and has two extrusion nozzles, making the
Cyclops+ ideal 3D printing designs with two different colors.
Like the Chimera+, the Cyclops+ is also available as a modified
Cyclops Aqua+ hot-end, suitable for water-cooled
extrusion.

One distinct advantage of the single extruder
design is that there is no idle nozzle that oozes whilst the
other nozzle is in operation. This means that there is no need
for an ooze-shield or height calibration.

Both the Chimera+ and the Cyclops+
use the same heatsink design, meaning that it
is also possible to swap between
air-cooled and water-cooled heatsinks. An external
heatsink fan ensures that there is no sudden change in the air
of the build chamber, which reduces the possibility of
warping.

Tell us who what you think the most
innovative 3D printer add-on has been this year. There is only
a week until nominations for the

3D Printing Industry Awards
2018
close. Submit your choices
now.

For more stories on 3D printing and the
extruder technology,
subscribe to our free 3D Printing Industry
newsletter
, follow us on Twitter, and like us
on 
Facebook.

Featured image shows the Cyclops+ and Chimera Aqua+
extruders with some multicolor designs. Photo via
E3D-Online.

Wikipedia goes 3D allowing users to upload .stls for digital reference

Wikimedia
Commons
, the free media repository of Wikipedia, has
introduced a new tool allowing contributors to upload 3D models
to the site.

The 3D models, as with Wikipedia’s other media content i.e.
photos, audio, vector and video files, will be embedded into
the site’s existing articles, adding a new dimension to
research done by the millions of readers who use the site every
day.

A big step forward for the 3D community, many of the models are
designed for 3D printing and academic reference.

3D Printing Industry spoke exclusively to Jonathan Beck,
founder of
Scan the World
and one of the first 3D contributors to
Wikimedia Commons, to discover more.

Pietà by Michelangelo is now viewable as a 3D model on Wikimedia. Scanned and digitally recreated by Scan the World.Pietà by
Michelangelo is now viewable as a 3D model on Wikimedia. Scanned
and digitally recreated by Scan the World.

#NEWPLAMYRA

The first 3D model to be uploaded to Wikimedia Commons is
the Asad Al-Lat statue, a sculpture resurrected from the

ruins of Palmyra
which was destroyed by ISIL in
2015.

Asad Al-Lat was chosen as the first 3D model by Wikimedia
Commons in memory of Bassel Khartabil, the Palestinian
Syrian open-source software developer, executed for
his activism by the Syrian government in 2015.

Bassel Khartabil’s legacy lives on in the #NEWPALMYRA project,
which he started to
digitally recreate the city
using collected digital
photographs.

Gilles Dubuc, one of the engineers behind the new 3D Wikimedia
feature,
comments
,  “Since I was familiar with 3D and had
worked on the Media Viewer extension, I felt like this was a
project where I could make a difference,”

“…The great importance of these free knowledge projects
inspired me to work on 3D integration for Wikimedia projects
to give a better platform for the hard work that people like
Bassel put into documenting history.”

The at-present modest collection of Wikimedia 3D models has
grown to include historic sculptures and landmark buildings
including the
Venus di Milo
The
Thinker by Auguste Rodin
and the
Parthenon in Athens
.

Asad Al-Lat lion statue in memory of Bassel Khartabil. 3D model by Georges Dahdouh/New Palmyra, CC0.Asad Al-Lat lion
statue was the first ever 3D model uploaded to Wikimedia Commons
in memory of Bassel Khartabil. 3D model by Georges Dahdouh/New
Palmyra.

Art for everyone

Scan the
World
is the non-profit art and sculpture segment of 3D
file hosting website MyMiniFactory, accounting for
more than 10,000
of the site’s 40,000+ guaranteed 3D
printable files. Beck, the project’s founder and curator, has
been in conversation with Wikimedia Commons since the
development stages of the 3D model uploading tool.

“Wikipedia has always been a great influence on Scan the
World’s collaborative approach for the democratization of
culture and dissemination of knowledge,” said Beck, “as well as
encouraging us to push for disrupting institutions to open
their data to the public.”

For Beck, and the wider MyMiniFactory community, Wikimedia’s
new tool is a validation of all the hard work that has gone
into curating 3D content since Scan the World started in 2014.

“Our collaboration with Wikipedia reminds us that we’re
working in the right direction for the future of sharing and
obtaining information.”

“Hopefully it will provide more leverage to encourage other
institutions to follow the likes of The SMK, MET and Musée
Saint-Raymond in opening their data to the world,” he added.

The Statens Museum for Kunst (SMK)or the National Gallery of Denmark along with the MET museum in New York and the Musée Saint-Raymond in Toulouse, have all made a digital collection of their artworks available to access and download online for free. Pictured above is a painting by Carl Rasmussen from 1872. Image via the SMK.The Statens Museum
for Kunst (SMK)or the National Gallery of Denmark along with the
MET museum in New York and the Musée Saint-Raymond in Toulouse,
have all made a digital collection of their artworks available to
access and download online for free. Pictured above is a painting
by Carl Rasmussen from 1872. Image via the SMK.

Photography powered

The
Wikimedia blog announcement
of the new feature tips its hat
to 3D models made using photogrammetry, encouraging more mobile
users to get involved and upload their findings.

As a community-based initiative, photogrammetry is the
predominant technology behind Scan the World’s entire art
collection, accounting for around 85% of the overall content.

“The majority of the models on the platform originate from
photogrammetric data provided by our community of
contributors,” comments Beck.

“It’s great to see the democratized technology embraced by
Wikipedia to encourage people to scan more objects.”

The initial stage of
photogrammetry
can be done with a smartphone camera. The
photos then need to be digitally stitched together, in a
program such as Autodesk ReMake, and finished to make a
complete model.

Scan the World provides this useful guide on how to get
started with scanning
.

Anyone who wishes to contribute to the Wikimedia Commons
archive of 3D models can do so simply by creating a free
Wikipedia account, and using the site’s in-built uploader.

The Wikimedia Commons feature currently accepts .stl files,
that can be downloaded and optimized for 3D printing.

You can find 3D printable Scan
the World
contributions to Wikimedia Commons here.

For more art, culture and heritage news subscribe to
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Nominate Scan the World and Wikimedia Commons in
the 2018
3D Printing Industry Awards
 now. Nominations close in
one week.

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creativity? Protolabs is
sponsoring the
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competition
. Enter now to win a 3D printer. 

Featured image shows a 3D model of the Laocoön Group
sculpture at the Vatican Museums, Vatican City. Image via Scan
the World/Wikimedia Commons

3D printed art on display in Google and Joris Laarman exhibitions

This week sees two pertinent exhibitions involving digital
design, cultural heritage and 3D printing open to the public.

In Mumbai’s Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj
Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS) museum, 10 3D printed ceramic vases
bearing the name of 10 culturally significant objects or
concepts have gone on permanent display to visitors. This
experimental exhibit, entitled Future
Relics,
 was organized by
CSMVS, 
Google Arts
& Culture Lab
, and the British Museum.

Concurrently, the High Museum in Atlanta, Georgia is hosting
the largest public
exhibition 
of the works of artist Joris Laarman
outside the Netherlands, Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the
Digital Age
. Laarman regularly incorporates digital
culture, 3D printing, and design engineering into his works.

Design in the Digital Age

Founded in 2004, the Joris Laarman Lab brings
together scientists, engineers,
programmers, and traditional crafts practitioners to approach
design in an innovative, multidisciplinary fashion.

The Laarman Lab’s designs are realized
using 
research, experimentation,
and the application of
cutting-edge technology. 

Notable examples of these will be on display at
the Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital
Age 
exhibition, which was organized by
the Groninger Museum in the
Netherlands.

Laarman Labs' MX3D Dragon Chair. Photo via Laarman Labs.Laarman Labs’ MX3D
Dragon Chair. Photo via Joris Laarman Labs.

Featured Joris Laarman Lab exhibits 

Central to the exhibition will be the Dragon Bench
(2014),
 manufactured using the same 3D printing
technique as the
MX3D Bridge
 and
steel bike
projects. This process originally used the
Laarman Lab’s robots to draw large objects in
mid-air using quick-drying resin. The robots were later
developed to weld and 3D print metal in mid-air.

Another featured exhibit is the Adaption Chair
(2014)
, which was produced as part of the Laarman Lab’s
Microstructures project. The Laarman Lab SLS 3D
printed the chair with a substrate, before coating it with
metal and burning away the substrate.

Sarah Schleuning, High Museum of Art curator of decorative
arts and design said that “Laarman and his Lab are designed
pioneers and idea detonators,” adding that,

“Laarman’s intellectual, thoughtful and collaborative
approach to design propels him to explore new means and
methods for creating, resulting in a remarkably innovative
and beautiful body of work.”

Joris Laarman Lab: Design in the Digital Age is on
display now until 13 May 2018.

Future Relics, the product of the present

The Future Relics exhibit is the
first Google Arts & Culture Lab experiment in
India, and was conceived as a new attraction for India and
the World: A History in Nine Stories
 exhibition
on in at the CSMVS museum.

Using the Google
Handwriting tool
, visitors were given a chance to
write down an object 
they would
want archaeologists to remember 1,000 years from now on a
virtual pot. This could be in 
Hindi, English or Marathi, which are the three official
languages of the Indian state of Maharastra. 

Google Translate grouped similar words
together, transcending the language barrier and drawing
thematic connections across the three languages and placing
them in groups on the virtual vases.

3D printing the vases at CSMVS. Photo via Google Arts and Culture.3D printing the vases
at CSMVS. Photo via Google Arts and Culture.

3D printing the Future Relics

From thousands of contributions, ten
vases were 3D printed with clay and each bears the
name of one of the ten most significant objects that the
visitors described. The objects words were:
M
obile, Car, Computer, Books, Can,
Utensils, Spectacles, Plastic, Gold, and Soil.

The vases digitally designed and 3D printed
using customized technology by artist Ronald Rael. They were
glazed in a traditional manner by one of India’s leading master
ceramics craftsmen, Shri Brahmdeo Ram Pandit.

The vases represent a meeting of
traditional craftsmanship and innovation and function as a time
capsule of the current age. G
ifted to
the museum, they are now on permanent display as a relic for
future generations to uncover.

Let us know what you think the most significant 3D printing
design innovation has been this year. Nominations for the


3D Printing Industry Awards
2018
are only open for another week. Submit
yours now.

Do you have the winning design for this year’s trophy?

Protolabs
is sponsoring
the

2018 3D Printing Industry Awards design
competition
. Submit your design now to win a
3D printer.

For more stories on 3D printing and art, subscribe to our
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, follow us on Twitter, and like us
on 
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 Featured image shows a Portrait of Joris
Laarman. Photo via High Museum.