3D authorship (generic term) ability (generic term) shredded GE Additive, fee (generic term) Group, EnvisionTEC, Markforged

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<![CDATA[ Today in the chopped 3D writing (generic term) intelligence digest, we return a expression inside Canada’s archetypal Marine accumulative Manufacturing Center of Excellence; survey colorful 3D writing (generic term); research 3D written castles; and behavior some dense lifting. GE accumulative, Toll Group, Xometry, EnvisionTec, Markforged and more than all feature below. Read on to discovery out … Continue reading “3D writing (generic term) intelligence chopped GE Additive, fee (generic term) Group, EnvisionTEC, Markforged”

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3D writing (generic term) intelligence chopped GE Additive, fee (generic term) Group, EnvisionTEC, Markforged

<![CDATA[

Today in the chopped 3D writing (generic term) intelligence digest, we return a expression inside Canada’s archetypal Marine accumulative Manufacturing halfway of Excellence; study colourful 3D writing (generic term); explore 3D written castles; and conduct any dense lifting. GE accumulative, fee (generic term) Group, Xometry, EnvisionTec, Markforged and more than all characteristic below. Read on to discovery out more than. Array of on-demand environment (generic term) created … Continue linguistic process (generic term) “3D writing (generic term) intelligence chopped GE accumulative, fee (generic term) Group, EnvisionTEC, Markforged”

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3D writing (generic term) intelligence chopped GE Additive, fee (generic term) Group, EnvisionTEC, Markforged

<![CDATA[

Today in the chopped 3D writing (generic term) intelligence digest, we return a expression inside Canada’s archetypal Marine accumulative Manufacturing Center of Excellence; survey colorful 3D writing (generic term); research 3D written castles; and behavior some dense lifting. GE accumulative, Toll Group, Xometry, EnvisionTec, Markforged and more than all feature below. Read on to discovery out more than. arrangement (generic term) of on-demand parts created … Continue reading “3D writing (generic term) intelligence chopped GE accumulative, Toll Group, EnvisionTEC, Markforged”

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3D Printing Community saddened by closure of Printrbot 3D printers

Open source 3D printer manufacturer Printrbot has announced the close of its business, citing poor sales as the reason for the decision. A simple statement on the Printrbot website from founder Brook Drumm reads:

“Printrbot is closed. Low sales led to hard decisions. We will be forever grateful to all the people we met and served over the years. Thank you all.”

For the time being, Drumm will reportedly be “unreachable” for comments, and plans to share his views and plans for this “final chapter” in due course.

The 3D Printing Community however has take to social media in mourning of the company, with figures including Joel Telling (YouTube’s 3D Printing Nerd), Thomas Sanladerer, and Dr. Adrian Bowyer himself weighing in on the close.

Brook Drumm and some early 3D printers. Photo via Printrbot.
Brook Drumm and some early 3D printers. Photo via Printrbot.

Printrbot history

Printrbot was founded by Drumm in 2011 a crowdfunding campaign on Kickstarter. Marketed as “your first 3D printer,” backing for the original Printrbot 3D printer reached $830,827, reportedly breaking Kickstarter’s record for tech pledges at the time.

Though generating a deal of cult support in the year’s following, there have been difficulties within the growing 3D printer market and the open source movement itself that have proved challenging to navigate.

The first Printrbot 3D printer. Photo via Printrbot
The first Printrbot 3D printer. Photo via Printrbot

Open Source challenges

In our interview with Drumm for the 10th anniversary of the RepRap project, he outlined the impact made by changes in the wider industry:

“A key part of the puzzle in the rapid spread of 3D printers across the globe is the rise of open source hardware businesses, like us, that sell inexpensive 3D printer kits. We were able to scale up faster than organic, grassroots growth alone could achieve,”

“The downside was that our innovative designs were also being used by companies with even bigger distribution channels and much deeper pockets.”

In addition, Drumm addresses some of the flaws with the open source movement itself, saying, “I have found, from the beginning of Printrbot in 2011, that Open Source was synonymous with disorganization,”

“I was trying to herd cats while finding the needles in the haystacks of ideas to chart Printrbot’s course. The 2nd law of thermodynamics is called to mind… things seem to tend toward disorder. Not much has changed since then.”

Still, his belief in the necessity of Open Source remained strong, “There is still a need for OS projects, of course,” he states, “The educational benefits of 3D printing alone are enough of a reason for me to stay engaged.”

Effect on the maker community

Since the announcement on 18 July 2018, Printrbot fans have taken to Twitter expressing their condolences for the closure, with some setting their 3D printers to half-z in tribute.

Joe Mike, YouTube: JoeMikeTerranella, sets his 3D printers to half z for Printrbot. Screengrab via Joe Mike, @MoeJike on Twitter
Joe Mike, YouTube: JoeMikeTerranella, sets his 3D printers to half z for Printrbot. Screengrab via Joe Mike, @MoeJike on Twitter

Adrian Bowyer, father of the RepRap movement that bore Printrbot 3D printers and other open source machines of this kind, also expressed his sadness at the announcement:

"I was sorry to hear of the demise of Printrbot. They were an innovative company who did great things. They will be missed. Good luck to Brook and everyone else involved." Image via Adrian Bowyer on Twitter
“I was sorry to hear of the demise of Printrbot. They were an innovative company who did great things. They will be missed. Good luck to Brook and everyone else involved.” Image via Adrian Bowyer on Twitter

3D Printing Industry has contacted the Printrbot team for further comment on the company’s closure.

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Featured image shows Brook Drumm and some early 3D printers. Photo via Printrbot.

3D Printhuset 3D printed houses backed by Antwerp

3D Printhuset, a Danish 3D printing reseller, service provider and developer, has reportedly won the “first EU tender ever for a construction 3D printer” with Kamp C in Belgium.

The sustainability and innovation driver for construction in Antwerp Province, Kamp C has acquired Printhuset’s BOD2 3D printer and plans to use the machine in its development of a 3D printing infrastructure for the city of Flanders.

“We are extremely proud and pleased that Kamp C chose us in competition with the many other contenders that always appear in such EU tenders,” comments Henrik Lund-Nielsen, CEO of 3D Printhuset.

“The BOD2 is the only second generation printer on the market and is really unique in the sense that it has been cured [of all the problems of]a first generation printer. Kamp C appreciated this fact and evaluated that we by far not only had the best price but also had the best technical offer.”

The first 3D printed building

3D Printhuset began 3D printing its first ever public construction project, The BOD office-hotel, in September 2017. Now complete, the BOD stands on site in Nordhavn harbor, Copenhagen. Though technically a habitable shelter, the small BOD office has really served as a proofing ground for 3D Printhuset’s technology and lessons learned from the process have been used to develop its second generation 3D printer.

Initially limited to 3D printed sizes up to 8 x 8 x 6 meters (X x Y x Z), the original BOD has been upgraded to a modular design relying on the connection between mutiple 2.5 meter long units.

Michael Holm, Development Manager of 3D Printhuset comments, “Following our own BOD project we received many requests for the delivery of multiple sizes of printers,”

“We also knew how to improve this second version, as we learned great many things from doing The BOD with our first printer.”

Interior and exterior of The Bod 3D printed office. Photos via 3D Printhuset.
Interior and exterior of The Bod 3D printed office. Photos via 3D Printhuset.

Bigger, faster, construction 3D printing 

The BOD2 construction 3D printer acquired by Kamp C is a version 444, which is capable of printing and area of 9.5 x 9.5 x 8.5 meters (X x Y x Z) meters in the length and width and 8,3 meters in the height.

In addition, the 3D Printhuset team asserts that the BOD2 is “10 x faster than the first generation” achieving print speeds of up up to 1000 mm/s, or 1 meter per second. The previous version reported top speeds of up to 2.5 m/m, with an average layer height between 50 and 70 mm.

Render of a BOD2 3D printer gantry. Image via 3D Printhuset
Render of a BOD2 3D printer gantry. Image via 3D Printhuset

3D printing in construction 

Arguably one of the most popular and accessible applications of 3D printing, construction has gathered a lot of interest with companies launched for the purpose all over the world.

In Russia, Apis Cor shared reports of a house 3D printed in just 24 hours. At Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Neri Oxman’s Mediated Matter team have developed a robot that can 3D print a structure in just 14. And, most recently, the Ramdani family became the first people to move into a 3D printed house produced by the University of Nantes (IUT) Yhnova project.

To stay up to date with 3D printing construction projects follow 3D Printing Industry on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to our newsletter. For 3D Printing Jobs, sign up here.

Featured image shows The BOD by 3D Printhuset. Clip via 3D Printhuset

Europe plans “leading role” in 3D printing, intellectual property is a challenge

The European Parliament has issued a resolution on 3D printing that experts warn could stifle innovation and lead to increased regulation.

The resolution is titled on three-dimensional printing, a challenge in the fields of intellectual property rights and civil liability and was adopted by with 631 votes in favour, 27 against and 19 abstentions.

Association calls for light-touch

CECIMO, the European Association representing the common interests of the Machine Tool Industries, has responded to the resolution. “We urge the European Institutions, however, to firmly differentiate between business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-consumer (B2C) uses of the technology, when approaching 3D printing from a regulatory perspective,” writes CECIMO

CECIMO recently published an activity report detailing initiatives to promote Additive Manufacturing.

From left to right: EMO General Commissar Welcker, Prime Minister Weich, Federal President of Germany Frank-Walter Steinmeier, CECIMO President Luigi Galdabini and SAP Board Member Bernd Leukert connect the lighting elements of EMO Hannover's logo at EMO 2017. Photo via EMO Hannover.
From left to right: EMO General Commissar Welcker, Prime Minister Weich, Federal President of Germany Frank-Walter Steinmeier, CECIMO President Luigi Galdabini and SAP Board Member Bernd Leukert connect the lighting elements of EMO Hannover’s logo at EMO 2017. Photo via EMO Hannover.

In the new resolution the benefits of 3D printing, it’s potential and advances on the horizon are outlined, however a key section notes that a (potentially) surprising factor is holding back further progress and the widespread adoption – a lack of sufficient regulations.

This may appear counter intuitive, especially when the language of innovation is liberally sprinkled throughout the report. FabLabs are explicitly called out as a “boon for inventors.”

Resolution calls for increased regulation

However it is the “the aerospace and medical/dental sectors, [where]regulating the use of 3D printers will help increase the use of technologies and offer opportunities for research and development”.

Healthcare and aerospace are, rightly so, sectors where regulation is necessary to protect the safety of the public. Additive manufacturing has made slow,but steady progress as an acceptable technology in the aerospace industry. The certification and qualification process for the LEAP series jet engine and the 3D printed fuel nozzle is a poster child for the industry partly because of the scarcity of other components. Yet this does not mean the industry should seek to rush through more critical components. As one additive manufacturing for aerospace expert told me at Farnborough Airshow this week, the failure of an AM aerospace component could “kill the industry for ten years.”

CECIMO also highlights that additive manufacturing processes are already subject to the regulations governing the particular industry they are deployed in.

A response to the resolution by the European Commission is expected within the coming months.

The full resolution on 3D printing can be read here, while the response by CECIMO is available here.

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Europe Parliament report on 3D printing.
European Parliament report on 3D printing.

Selected highlights from the resolution

“3D printing is viewed as one of the most prominent technologies, with regard to which Europe can play a leading role; whereas the Commission recognised the benefits of 3D printing by sponsoring 21 projects based on the technology by Horizon 2020 between 2014-2016;”

“the market for 3D printers constitutes a sector which is experiencing rapid growth and whereas this is expected to continue in the coming years;”

“3D printing has an enormous potential to transform supply chains in manufacturing which could help Europe increase output levels; whereas the application of this technology offers new opportunities for business development and innovation;”

“EU has made 3D printing one of the priority areas of technology; whereas the Commission referred to it, in its recent reflection paper on harnessing globalisation , as one of the main factors in bringing about industrial transformation;”

“it is to be expected that the limitations as regards materials that can be used, speed, and the consumption of raw materials and energy will be significantly reduced in a short period of time;”

“3D-printing might enable consumers to hit back at in-built obsolescence, as they will be able to make replacement parts for household appliances, whose lifespan is becoming increasingly shorter;”

“new technologies are able to scan objects or people and generate digital files which can subsequently be printed in 3D, and whereas this can affect image rights and the right to privacy;”

“may raise some specific legal and ethical concerns regarding all areas of intellectual property law, such as copyright, patents, designs, three-dimensional trademarks and even geographical indications, and civil liability, and whereas, moreover, those concerns fall within the remit of Parliament’s Committee on Legal Affairs;”

“in conclusion, legal experts are of the view that 3D printing has not fundamentally altered intellectual property rights, but files created may be considered a work and whereas, if that is the case, the work must be protected as such; whereas, in the short and medium term, and with a view to tackling counterfeiting, the main challenge will be to involve professional copyright intermediaries more closely;”

Lockheed Martin 3D printed antenna database funded in NextFlex $12 millon offering

An additive manufacturing project at American global defense contractor Lockheed Martin has won the support of NextFlex, America’s Flexible Hybrid Electronics (FHE) Manufacturing Institute.

This year the institute, which was formed by the U.S. Department of Defence (DoD) and FlexTech Alliance, split a fund of $12 million between a total of seven projects, led by the likes of Boeing, Epicore, GE, Binghampton University, Georgia Tech and MicroConnex.

Each one was selected for its potential to bridge gaps in the manufacturing of flexible hybrid electronics.

Malcolm Thompson, executive director of NextFlex, comments,

“The seven projects we’ve selected not only make exciting developments in fields like healthcare, avionics or heavy industry, but they’re creating building blocks upon which future researchers can create new applications with FHE, accelerating the pace of true FHE innovation.”

A stretch of the imagination

The Project Call program was set up by NextFlex to seek the “big idea people” for the electronics industry. Teams awarded under the program can receive up to 50% of the development costs for a project, and the current focus in flexible, stretchable systems, particularly those that implement “additive processing.”

In this year’s Project Call 3.0, Lockheed Martin has been granted funding for two projects – one internal to the company alone, and one it is running in collaboration with Georgia Tech.

Tech Tower at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Photo via: nique.net
Tech Tower at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta. Photo via nique.net

A database for additive manufactured, flexible antennas

In the first NextFlex project from Lockheed, funds have been granted to the compilation of a database of “additively printed antennas and microwave elements.”

In the second, a Lockheed/Georgia Tech team has been awarded funds for a project to develop “epidermal sensors for robotic exoskeleton knee control,” which will help in monitoring injuries, and soldier rehabilitation.

Last year, a project led by Lockheed and Martin and Optomec was also the recipient of NextFlex funding. With $3 million in backing, this team is working to advance tooling, software and 3D printing processes to make it easier to add electronics to complex surfaces.

Optomec's turbine blade with printed sensors shown at RAPID + TCT. Photo via Optomec.
Aerosol Jetted creep sensors 3D printed onto a prefabricated turbine blade. Photo via Optomec.

The remaining 5 projects

Boeing is another double recipient of the NextFlex Project Call 3.0. This year, the aerospace giant has been awarded funding for the development of a large, flexible sensor network that can be integrated into industrial systems, and for research into printed passive elements that evaluate “chemical behavior of printed materials.”

Other 2018 NextFlex beneficiaries include:

– Development led by Epicor of thin, flexible systems for disposable, “skin-like” health monitoring systems for healthcare and athletic performance.

– Development led by GE and Binghamton University of disposable, clinical-grade vital sign monitoring devices designed to increase patient safety and shorten hospital stays.

– Development led by MicroConnex of low cost flexible circuit fabrication processes using roll-to-roll printing for high volume production.

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Featured image shows NextFlex motto. Image via NextFlex on Facebook

NASA awards Bally Ribbon Mills for its advanced 3D thermal material

Bally Ribbon Mills, a Pennsylvania-based 3D fabric manufacturer, has received a Space Technology Award from NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) for weaving the 3D material used within NASA’s Heat Shield for Extreme Entry Environment Technology (HEEET) project.

The HEEET project aims to develop a new Thermal Protection System that leverages weaving and 3D printing manufacturing methods for aircraft parts made of carbon composite materials. This will ultimately better enable in situ robotic science missions.

“The STMD community sincerely appreciates your hard work, leadership, and dedication to providing NASA and the Nation with revolutionary new technologies and capabilities,” said Stephen G. Jurczyk, STMD’s Associate Administrator.

The HEEET Project's 3D printed woven preform molded and resin infused on a space vessel component. Photo via NASA.
The HEEET Project’s 3D printed woven preform molded and resin infused on a space vessel component. Photo via NASA.

Robust space materials

Heat shields are unique components that protect spacecraft structures and payloads from the intense heat of entry into a planet’s atmosphere.

The HEEET project, wanting to reduce the design time and cost of individual heat shields per mission, has created a range of materials that can be used on multiple spacecraft intended for multiple destinations. The first Thermal Protection System solution from HEEET includes a carbon phenolic material.  

Bally Ribbon Mills and a team from the HEEET project worked on a process that weaves carbon fibers of different compositions and variable yarn densities to create numerous 3D panel structures. The panels are infused with resins and then cured to solidify the fibers into place.

Advanced modeling, design, and manufacturing tools were also used to optimize the material’s overall performance and properties, including a tolerance to atmospheric pressures and a high heat flux rate –  the flow of energy controlling surrounding surface temperatures.

As a result of its improved properties, the thermal protection system will be used for future space probe and lander explorations.

“HEEET offers this robust performance and can be adapted to enable scientific probe missions to Venus, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune and sample return missions from Mars, asteroids, comets, Europa and Enceladus,” said Ethiraj Venkatapathy, ‎NASA Ames’ Principal Technologist for Entry Systems and Team Leader for Advanced Thermal Protection System development.

HEEET material for future missions will be woven with a new 24-inch loom that is capable of weaving dual layer HEEET material 24 inches wide at thicknesses of 2 inches and greater. Photo via NASA.
HEEET material for future missions will be woven with a new 24-inch loom that is capable of weaving dual layer HEEET material 24 inches wide at thicknesses of 2 inches and greater. Photo via NASA.

3D printed space fabrics

Last year, researchers from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory created woven metal fabrics using additive manufacturing that could be used on deployable space devices.

“The fabrics could eventually be used to shield a spacecraft from meteorites, for astronaut spacesuits, or for capturing objects on the surface of another planet,” said Raul Polit-Casillas, a Systems Engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Prior to this, a team of researchers from the Russia space program Roscosmos, explored the uses of 3D printing and carbon fiber composite materials, which are commonly used in industry to make lightweight and durable parts.

The HEEET project now aims to reduce heat shield weight, cutting mass by up to 50%, with a corresponding reduction in G loads (gravity forces) on the spacecraft.

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Featured image shows HEEET material for future missions on a loom. Photo via NASA.

3D writing (generic term) gathering (generic term) saddened by closing of Printrbot 3D printers

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Open source 3D printer maker Printrbot has proclaimed the adjacent of its business, citing poor gross sales as the ground for the decision. A simple argument on the Printrbot web site from founder Brook Drumm reads: “Printrbot is adjacentd. Low gross sales led to difficult decisions. We will be everlastingly thankful to all the group (generic term) we met and … Continue reading “3D Printing gathering (generic term) saddened by closing of Printrbot 3D printers”

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3D writing (generic term) gathering (generic term) saddened by closing of Printrbot 3D printers

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Open beginning 3D pressman maker Printrbot has announced the adjacent of its business, citing hapless gross sales as the ground for the decision. A simple argument on the Printrbot website from laminitis creek Drumm reads: “Printrbot is adjacentd. Low gross sales led to difficult decisions. We volition be everlastingly grateful to all the people we met and … Continue reading “3D writing (generic term) gathering (generic term) saddened by closing of Printrbot 3D pressmans”

The post 3D writing (generic term) gathering (generic term) saddened by closing of Printrbot 3D pressmans appeared first on 3dprinter.in.

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